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ADN then BSN or go for BSN?

Pre-Nursing   (817 Views 9 Comments)
by mmwill0256 mmwill0256 (New Member) New Member

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I'm having a hard time deciding if I should go for an ADN then do an RN-BSN program, or if I should just go for my BSN. The ADN program I'm considering is a two-year program, not including pre-reqs, and I could complete my pre-reqs over the Summer and Fall of next year. The BSN would require three semesters of pre-reqs (Summer, Fall, and Spring) but the nursing part is only two years.

I'm a sophomore in college right now and I just decided to switch to nursing. I'm just not sure if it's a good idea to get an ADN first or not? I've heard that it's hard to get a job with just an Associate's degree. I appreciate any advice people can give, I just really want to hear another student's or nurse's experiences/advice as I don't know any nurses to ask.

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Sour Lemon has 9 years experience.

654 Likes; 2 Followers; 28,774 Visitors; 4,048 Posts

I'm having a hard time deciding if I should go for an ADN then do an RN-BSN program, or if I should just go for my BSN. The ADN program I'm considering is a two-year program, not including pre-reqs, and I could complete my pre-reqs over the Summer and Fall of next year. The BSN would require three semesters of pre-reqs (Summer, Fall, and Spring) but the nursing part is only two years.

I'm a sophomore in college right now and I just decided to switch to nursing. I'm just not sure if it's a good idea to get an ADN first or not? I've heard that it's hard to get a job with just an Associate's degree. I appreciate any advice people can give, I just really want to hear another student's or nurse's experiences/advice as I don't know any nurses to ask.

Location matters a lot here ...and also what you're hoping to do right out of school. For a competitive specialty in an employer's market, a BSN makes sense. For a less competitive specialty in an employee's market, an ASN will be just fine.

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2 Likes; 148 Visitors; 9 Posts

I'm in the Atlanta area. I really want to work in either a PICU or NICU eventually.

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Sour Lemon has 9 years experience.

654 Likes; 2 Followers; 28,774 Visitors; 4,048 Posts

I'm in the Atlanta area. I really want to work in either a PICU or NICU eventually.

I have no idea how things are in Atlanta, but most people who require hospitalization are adults. Pediatric specialties tend to be more competitive, as there are fewer patients and fewer positions.

BSN would probably be better, along with a willingness to move if necessary. If you're very young with few commitments, I'd suggest BSN even stronger.

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Hi OP! I did the same thing--admitted to college and changed my degree to nursing! For me, the BSN program at my previous university was very expensive and on probation with the Board of Nursing in our state, leading me to look elsewhere. I happened to have all of the pre-reqs and almost ALL of my general education credits for an ADN program and do not regret picking it. It is cheaper and a 2 year program. I was able to have a Assoc in Applied Science of Nursing major, and a Pre-BSN major in tandem (the latter I have already finished). I am locked into an agreement with a local university that takes our school's ADN students and admits them for two semesters post-grad from nursing school. Once these 2 semesters are finished, we are awarded BSNs. I agree with SourLemon, having a BSN is required for you to work in a hospital. I am an advocate for ADN, but if you do not have 60 credits laying around for transfer and will have to wait to finish pre-reqs, possibly look for really good BSN programs in your area. It cannot hurt to apply to both, as we do not know the level of competitiveness your portfolio has!

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2 Likes; 148 Visitors; 9 Posts

Okay, thank you! I was struggling between going for the ASN or the BSN and your answer really helped. I'm definitely going to go for the BSN!

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2 Likes; 148 Visitors; 9 Posts

Thank you! I actually researched the ASN and BSN programs I'm looking at more in-depth and I realized I would probably only finish a semester sooner with the ASN. It's my dream to work at a children's hospital, so I am definitely going to go for the BSN.

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I think it all depends on you and your situation! Hospitals are moving towards BSNs.. not saying every nurse has a BSN in a hospital, but in terms of the future of nursing, hospitals want their nurses with BSNs (at least). It's all about continuing education. You'll have to get your BSN eventually, so whichever route works best for you right now should be the route you take :) One of my best friends was in the same boat you were in. She switched to nursing when she was a sophomore, but she is finishing her last year in her ADN program and she plans on doing a RN to BSN route. Good luck to you!! :)

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I agree with the specialty focused comments about me. (Although, I am now a pediatric nurse and NEVER thought I would do that in a million years during nursing school) 

I did an ADN first that I could afford to pay without student loans then took a year off from school to work as an RN. I saved during that time and did an RN-to-BSN program that took me 16mos to complete. (2 summers and a fall/spring). 

I am now doing my Master's after taking a year off to work at the BSN level and save and have managed to complete all my education this far without taking out a student loan. I 100% attribute it to going with an Associate's first.

 

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