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ACNP vs FNP: My Summarization of the Great Debate

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by rauscht rauscht (New Member) New Member

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djmatte has 7 years experience as a ADN, MSN, RN, NP.

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1 hour ago, Jdartis22 said:

My state has one scope of practice for NP's. Many states have one scope for NP's amd doesnt break down specifics of what you can and can not  do.  Im FNP and did my last rotation in ICU placing central lines , art lines etc...those are things you dont get in text books or lectures. Its experience. States dont place these things in scope of practice as they are learned skills that any NP can perform.  There is nothing ACNP gets in school to make them better working in acute care that an FnP cant do in the same setting 

Look at that map... NC where i live doesnt have that 

 

Your state also at one time likely forced NPs to be supervised by an MD in every facet of their job.  There was also a time when FNP (and maybe crna) was the only advanced certification you could get as a nurse.  By suggesting an FNP can work in an acute care capacity is suggesting either ACNP certifications are useless /worthless or they are perfectly equipped to work in primary care (they aren't). 

 Times are changing. Our accrediting bodies saw fit to specialize np practice rather than generalize it.  Most NPs that frequent here who are in the hospital game recognize the performance differences between ACNPs and FNPs.  Hospitals and states are also catching on. This isn't simply relegated to individual strengths. It comes down to clinical competencies and where certifying bodies decide their training should focus. You got away with acute care because you were needed in a spot there are too few ACNPs. This will not be the case in the future and is already changing.

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My hospital has made it clear  that we will not see a change in hiring of APRN. They state that this will always be the decision of the organization.   ACNP are limited because they can only see adults patients where FNP can see any age population.  Its funny you compare the two  cause our FNP critical care practitioners are just as comparable and ACNP's and some are better so to state there are performance differences is not accurate. Just like some ADN nurses can run circles around some BSN nurses...... its all experience  that makes the practitioner option 

Edited by Jdartis22

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djmatte has 7 years experience as a ADN, MSN, RN, NP.

2 Followers; 780 Posts; 7,104 Profile Views

Lol "always" is a pretty finite statement in a world that's always changing. And it's not a shock that a hospital would try to cut corners because they can't find people actually certified in that role.  Keep believing those statements and be glad you are already working there.  Meanwhile the consensus model is actively happening and is the future that both pushes nurse practitioners to work more independently and allows legal cover should someone question their scope of practice. Don't presume new NPs who aren't you can expect your same luxuries you experience.  For most of them, any certification other than FNP will be far bigger opportunity.

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traumaRUs has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

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2 hours ago, djmatte said:

Your state also at one time likely forced NPs to be supervised by an MD in every facet of their job.  There was also a time when FNP (and maybe crna) was the only advanced certification you could get as a nurse.  By suggesting an FNP can work in an acute care capacity is suggesting either ACNP certifications are useless /worthless or they are perfectly equipped to work in primary care (they aren't). 

 Times are changing. Our accrediting bodies saw fit to specialize np practice rather than generalize it.  Most NPs that frequent here who are in the hospital game recognize the performance differences between ACNPs and FNPs.  Hospitals and states are also catching on. This isn't simply relegated to individual strengths. It comes down to clinical competencies and where certifying bodies decide their training should focus. You got away with acute care because you were needed in a spot there are too few ACNPs. This will not be the case in the future and is already changing.

Exactly - this is what you have right NOW. I'm in IL and thats what we had too - FNP was the way to go. Now, in IL, you can't get credentialed for an inpt position unless you are AGACNP or CNS

Unless you have only a few years left to work, you'd be wise to look at legislation in your area. And...the hospitals aren't the ones that will hold the bag - it will be YOU. 

2 hours ago, djmatte said:

Lol "always" is a pretty finite statement in a world that's always changing. And it's not a shock that a hospital would try to cut corners because they can't find people actually certified in that role.  Keep believing those statements and be glad you are already working there.  Meanwhile the consensus model is actively happening and is the future that both pushes nurse practitioners to work more independently and allows legal cover should someone question their scope of practice. Don't presume new NPs who aren't you can expect your same luxuries you experience.  For most of them, any certification other than FNP will be far bigger opportunity.

In IL, FNPs were not grandfathered into their positions - nope they had five years to obtain the proper certification or they were out....

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babyNP. has 10 years experience and specializes in NICU.

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Way back when, there was no such thing as a "NNP." One of my colleagues got her FNP and worked in the NICU as an ARNP many moons ago. Now, of course, it's unheard of for an FNP to work in a NICU. Even hospitals that hire PNPs in the NICU are often "making" their employees get their NNP certification after working awhile. 

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Wow. Thats crazy.  My hospital,  the nicu and picu is mostly FNP's. Skme newer aprn have to get certified now after i think 2 years of employment 

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