Transitioning to Wound Care Nursing

  1. 0
    I am an RN who recently moved to another state and is in the process of applying for my license. Prior to the move, I worked as a Dialysis Nurse in an outpatient setting, but I am taking this transition time to consider training as a wound care nurse.
    Now that I have some work history as a nurse, I have mentally inventoried what I like about the profession and what frustrates me. I know I prefer:
    1. chronic care (like to get to know my patients)
    2. working with adults especially geriatrics (versus kids)
    3. "hands on care" (versus managing techs, aides, etc.)
    4. understanding the "science" behind medicine so as to be able to contribute to the "bigger picture" ( eg not able just dressing a wound, but also working with other healthcare professionals to figure out what other issues are impeding healing - eg poor nutrition, disease processes, etc).

    5. educating patients about their condition and how to manage it.
    I am hoping wound care will cover all those "likes" plus avoid some of the frustrations inherent in how in-center dialysis is currently provided - the "getting people on/off" the machines quickly , staffing clinics based predominately cost factors, not what would allow you to provide the kind of care you'd like, etc

    I'd love feedback on whether my perception that wound care is in line with my preferences is accurate and how much the "bottom line" impacts on job satisfaction.

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  2. 0
    Quote from aab1964
    I am an RN who recently moved to another state and is in the process of applying for my license. Prior to the move, I worked as a Dialysis Nurse in an outpatient setting, but I am taking this transition time to consider training as a wound care nurse.
    Now that I have some work history as a nurse, I have mentally inventoried what I like about the profession and what frustrates me. I know I prefer:
    1. chronic care (like to get to know my patients)
    2. working with adults especially geriatrics (versus kids)
    3. "hands on care" (versus managing techs, aides, etc.)
    4. understanding the "science" behind medicine so as to be able to contribute to the "bigger picture" ( eg not able just dressing a wound, but also working with other healthcare professionals to figure out what other issues are impeding healing - eg poor nutrition, disease processes, etc).

    5. educating patients about their condition and how to manage it.
    I am hoping wound care will cover all those "likes" plus avoid some of the frustrations inherent in how in-center dialysis is currently provided - the "getting people on/off" the machines quickly , staffing clinics based predominately cost factors, not what would allow you to provide the kind of care you'd like, etc

    I'd love feedback on whether my perception that wound care is in line with my preferences is accurate and how much the "bottom line" impacts on job satisfaction.
    Great post. I am also interested in becoming a wound care nurse and like your criteria list. I am an RN with a year of med-surg and eleven years in an orthopedic clinic. I just completed the first part of an RN refresher, due to my long absence from bed side nursing, and would like to do my 96 hour practicum in wound care. I look forward to hearing from the wound care nurses out there in response to your post.
  3. 0
    Your nursing "likes" would fit WOCN nursing. WOCN has great website for info. You need BSN and the WOCN
    webside list approved programs. Some are online or mostly online so you can live anywhere. I did WebWOC out of
    St Louis. You can do one, two or all three certifications. I work in LTC and like the continuity.
  4. 0
    55ahdrn-

    Thanks for your information and response.

    Is you role in LTC strictly wound care (ie you function as a "treatment nurse" ) or one of many duties as an RN in a LTC facility? I have heard that wound care can be a litigious position and that the RN is singled out for ulcers, non-healing wounds, etc. even if there may be other contributing factors, players, etc. Have you found that to be true? If so, how have you addressed that challenge?

    Also, while I know each institution is different, how have you found that your workload is reasonable and that you are well supported in your role?

    Thanks in advance for your insights.
  5. 0
    Please read my thread " how many residents can a wound care nurse safely care for"
  6. 0
    Hi, I work in the UK as our equivalent of WOCN, known as a Tissue Viability Nurse. In many ways we are lucky in the Uk as we qualify as a Registered nurse & dont have to apply for licences as we move counties etc. Ive done the TVN job for 5 years today and it can be the most satisfying job in the world, working with all ages, across all specialties and it never gets boring because theres always something new to learn, new proceedures, extending in to prescribing & advanced roles. Theres nothing more satisfying than healing a dehisced surgical wound like an open abdomen or a pressure ulcer, or managing a wound in a terminally ill patient & providing good end of life care but at the same time it can be frustrating when recources arent available staff dont listen or wont attend training, and yes there is a huge legal implication when avoidable pressure ulcers occur or we get called to the coroners court, the most terrifying day of my life.
  7. 1
    americanTrain and JammyPam -

    Thank you do much for your comments!
    americanTrain likes this.


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