Calcium Alginate Rope with silver

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    I recently received a home care client who has a very deep wound (1.0cm length by 1.5cm width by 3.5cm depth, tunnel at 12 o'clock 6.0cm, 10 o'clock is 4.5cm). We were given the instructions to cleanse with would cleaner, apply calcium alginate rope with silver and cover with foam adhesive. I have never used this calcium alginate rope with silver and from what i have read about it it gels once against the wound. So my question is are we still soaking it in saline before packing? I would assume to but I want to make sure. I am in the process of trying to get a hold of the wound clinic for more infor but no such luck at this time. Please give any info you can to help me understand this product.
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  3. 3 Comments so far...

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    No. Calcium alginate with silver dressings do not need anything applied to them - the purpose is to help absorb drainage as well as add antimicrobial properties. Actually, the latest research shows that saline deactivates some of the silver properties and so we have been irrigating with sterile water. Yes, the dressing "gels" and it actually makes it look like there is a lot of nasty tan drainage - that's normal. If the dressing is dry when you remove it then it hasn;t stayed in long enough. It can actually stay in for 7 days if needed. Most of my patients get their dressings changed 2-3 times a week. Hope that helps!
    RNhbaggenstoss likes this.
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    That helps a lot, thanks!!
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    Quote from annaedRN
    No. Calcium alginate with silver dressings do not need anything applied to them - the purpose is to help absorb drainage as well as add antimicrobial properties. Actually, the latest research shows that saline deactivates some of the silver properties and so we have been irrigating with sterile water. Yes, the dressing "gels" and it actually makes it look like there is a lot of nasty tan drainage - that's normal. If the dressing is dry when you remove it then it hasn;t stayed in long enough. It can actually stay in for 7 days if needed. Most of my patients get their dressings changed 2-3 times a week. Hope that helps!

    You seem very informed, so I have a question. I normally work in a nursing home, but recently decided to do home wound care. I am an LPN and have experience in the nursing home with wounds, but I am in new uncharted territory. I was given a client to do wound care on who is 450 LBS and currently they are doing a hydrocolloid dressing on her with tegaderm covering. The doc has left it up to the nurses, and the owner of the agency without looking at the wound has decided on the current treatment. This being my first day the nurse training me asked for my advise on possible other treatments. At the time the only thing I could suggest was skin prep to the surrounding area of the wound because her skin is fragile and tearing with each dressing removal. A very informed nurse that I work with at the nursing home suggested silver nitrate which I think is a very paulsable idea since the wound has very little drainage and its a q3d dressing change currently. Do you or anyone else have any other suggestions that would promote healing (according to the pt this wound has been ongoing for 2 years). The pressure area itself is maybe 1x1.5cm the skin around the area is mildly blachable with fragile and elephant like skin. Any suggestions or advise would be very appreciated.


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