balloon testing prior to insertion of foley

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    I am looking for research/studies regarding inflation of balloons prior to insertion. we are currently revising our policy. if anyone knows about studies on whether to test the balloon or not please let me know.

    thanks.
  2. 27 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    You always test to make sure that it works; same way that you test the balloon for the cuff on an endotracheal tube, and the balloons on fogarty catheters, etc. I would not want to be the one putting it in, and finding out that there was a leak later, and it needed to be replaced.

    We test the balloons on everything in the OR before it gets inserted into a patient, doesn't matter where it gets inserted. Body cavity or vessel.
  4. 0
    Quote from suzanne4
    You always test to make sure that it works; same way that you test the balloon for the cuff on an endotracheal tube, and the balloons on fogarty catheters, etc. I would not want to be the one putting it in, and finding out that there was a leak later, and it needed to be replaced.

    We test the balloons on everything in the OR before it gets inserted into a patient, doesn't matter where it gets inserted. Body cavity or vessel.
    I know, but we need research articles to back up our change in policy(if needed). Our uro docs are not sure; they can't come up with a evidence based practice article.
    So, basically we need a study (ies) to tell us whether or not to inflate.

    I inflate. It's the way I was taught in nursing school. Tradition .

    The company said no need to test the balloon because if we do the balloon will lose its "elasticity" there by increasing the chance of the balloon not "anchoring" itself ....

    thanks
  5. 0
    The baloon won't "anchor"? What? There are a few times I have had a faulty foley....yep. Manufacturer defect!

    Have you done a Google search?

    Suebird
    Last edit by suebird3 on May 29, '06
  6. 0
    Quote from suebird3
    The baloon won't "anchor"? What? There are a few times I have had a faulty floey....yep. Manufacturer defect!

    Have you done a Google search?

    Suebird
    habit-based to evidence-based practice

    sorry, not anchor. when i started to write the thread i was so tired.

    anyway, what we are trying to find in our lit review is whether or not inflating a catheter balloon (testing it) prior to insertion will weaken the balloon itself thereby increasing the chance of it slipping out of the pt.

    i test the balloons. i think we all do it because it is habit based. we want to go from habit based practice to evidence-based practice.

    I've done a pub med search..will try a google and see where it takes me.

    if i find anything worth while i will share it here.

    thanks.
  7. 0
    I was taught in nursing school to test inflate it first, but my hospital has changed the policy to not test it - because of it losing elasticity. Also, when taking the foley out, we've been taught to not aspirate (pull back on the syringe plunger) to draw the fluid out and defate the balloon. You're supposed to just attach the syringe and the fluid will fill up on its own. (I guess you can collapse the catheter, making it impossible for the balloon to deflate.) I'm sure literature exists - I would ask the manufacturer to back up their claim with evidenced-based research. They should be familiar enough with the medical community to know that evidenced-based research is the gold standard for changing policies/practices. Make the company's sales rep do the work for you. They get the big bucks - that's their job!
  8. 0
    the company says they test balloons and do submersion tests on the urinary catheters at the end of manufacturing. they say testing prior to insertion is not needed. i think i will try to get the research from them...they must have something. also from the articles that i have read testing prior to insertion adds extra ridges to the catheter which can irritate tissue on insertion making for patient discomfort.
  9. 0
    When we started using silicone caths and stopped using latex, we were told they didn't have to be tested. Of course we never really got an explanation why.
  10. 0
    You could also specifically try Google Scholar:
    http://scholar.google.com/

    Thanks for bringing up the topic... I just graduated and I was taught to test it...
  11. 0
    I recently tested a foley cath that, sure enough, had a leak. If I hadn't tested....


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