Any advantages of Philippine nursing?

  1. 0
    For Philippine BSN grads now working in the US, or for anyone who has experience working with them, is there anything that makes these people unique in any way compared to their US-trained colleagues? As a recent foreign grad myself, I am still a long way from landing my first RN job in the US, but I am already anticipating a job interview question like, "What have you learned in your Philippine nursing education (or culture) that would make you an asset to this hospital?"

    Aside from a chance to be with family and presumably save some money, I would like to think that my having Philippine nursing education has taught me something that maybe I might not have as readily learned in a US nursing school (in which I was once enrolled but dropped out after a couple days to take up nursing in the Philippines, for various reasons).
  2. 5 Comments so far...

  3. 1
    You mention in another posting that your aunt and a cousin are both CA RN's. Have you asked them? They will be one some good informational sources, let us know what they say so that others can draw from that, thanks!
    Fiona59 likes this.
  4. 3
    My employer has scripted interview questions, and with our equal opportunity laws, your question would never be asked.
  5. 3
    I have a BSN from the Philippines (1991) and an MSN here in the US (2003). Before and after I obtained the graduate degree here, I have never been asked specifically about how my BSN was like during an interview even though it is an obvious fact in my resume. I have to agree that most interview question follow a script and all questions are devoid of inquiries that could be interpreted as employment bias based on race, country of origin or education. But then I wouldn't know what's being discussed behind closed doors about my application and qualifications.
    zylphRN, loriangel14, and Fiona59 like this.
  6. 3
    Quote from mpgj83
    For Philippine BSN grads now working in the US, or for anyone who has experience working with them, is there anything that makes these people unique in any way compared to their US-trained colleagues?
    I would steer away from focusing on group identity to market your strengths. For me, it's best to stick to individuality by letting your own strengths as a person show not only during a job interview but also in the way you conduct your day to day activities as an employee in an organization. It will also protect you from preconceptions and stereotypical judgements people hold about certain groups (including racial and ethnic identities). I hope that makes sense.
    zylphRN, loriangel14, and Fiona59 like this.
  7. 0
    You all have excellent points. Thank you.


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