Pros/Cons of a Western Governors degree - page 3

Can anyone tell me the pro/cons of a Western Governors degree. I've heard conflicting views and don't know what to believe.... Read More

  1. Visit  RN*mommy profile page
    1
    Quote from PMFB-RN

    *** That is not an RN to MSN program inspite of what they call it. I was well aware that WGU offers a path to MSN for RNs when I stated the fact that they do not offer an RN to MSN program.
    I'm confused? I started with an ADN and I'm in the RN-MSN Education track. I received my BSN in January and will hopefully have my MSN by January of next year.
    ShondaJ likes this.
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  3. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    Quote from RN*mommy
    I'm confused? I started with an ADN and I'm in the RN-MSN Education track. I received my BSN in January and will hopefully have my MSN by January of next year.
    *** There are RN to MSN programs where one goes from ADN to MSN and does not have or earn a bachelors degree a long the way. There are also RN to BSN to MSN like at WGU where one goes through all the steps but some graduate credits are used to meet undergrad requirements, thus saving the student (usually) about 9 credits at the undergrad level.
  4. Visit  gypsyatheart profile page
    2
    Actually, it is an RN to MSN program. I think you're getting hung up on semantics. If a school does not offer an RN to MSN program then you MUST have a BSN to enroll. WGU offers ADN RN's the opportunity to enroll directly in the MSN program, and yes, it s a bit shorter than the time/classes. And what is nice, and didfferent from some ADN RN to MSN programs, you actually do have the option to receive your BSN as well as the MSN.
    klone and marycarney like this.
  5. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    Quote from gypsyatheart
    And what is nice, and didfferent from some ADN RN to MSN programs, you actually do have the option to receive your BSN as well as the MSN.
    *** Oh I did not realize that and stand corrected. I didn't realize that recieving the BSN was an option as you say. I was under the impression from their web site, and people I know who have competed their degree at WGU, that it was required to earn a BSN enrout to the MSN. I will try to find the no BSN option on their website. That would indeed make is am RN to MSN program.
  6. Visit  klone profile page
    0
    No, it's not an option - you DO earn the BSN along the way. I'm confused as to why you think this is a negative. If you enroll directly into the RN-MSN program, there are a few classes that are streamlined, and you can take some of the MSN level classes before earning the BSN, which is why it is an RN-MSN program. If it weren't, then you wouldn't be able to enroll in it as an ADN, you would have to enroll twice, into two different programs (once for BSN, and a second time for MSN).
  7. Visit  jeli42 profile page
    0
    Quote from SPJJMommy
    I had the same GPA concern, so I called a few prospective graduate schools in California to ask about the whole WGU 3.0 situation. I was told that the minimum GPA for these programs is typically a 3.0 on a 4.0 scale, but because a 3.0 is the highest you can get at WGU, they take that into consideration. Basically, many of these schools will look a a 3.0 from WGU a little differently than a 3.0 from another university. Might not be true for every program, but it made me feel better about my decision to enroll at WGU (I've been very happy with the school and the education I've been receiving... highly recommend!).
    I don't think it's an issue about getting a Masters. The issue is getting into a highly impacted and competitive program such as FNP or AGNP/ACNP or CRNA. The reps I spoke with said if you're looking at a less impacted program such as Pediatrics or Women's Health, it's not much of an issue. Depends on what you want to do. Glad you're liking it! Each person's situation is different.
  8. Visit  RN*mommy profile page
    0
    Quote from PMFB-RN

    *** There are RN to MSN programs where one goes from ADN to MSN and does not have or earn a bachelors degree a long the way. There are also RN to BSN to MSN like at WGU where one goes through all the steps but some graduate credits are used to meet undergrad requirements, thus saving the student (usually) about 9 credits at the undergrad level.
    I certainly look at obtaining my BSN as part of my MSN program a huge plus! It enabled me to land a job that only hires BSN nurses. I'm currently working in my dream job while still earning my MSN degree. I think a college that doesn't award a BSN is missing the mark. My goal, after finishing my BSN in 6 months is to complete my MSN in a year and I'm definitely on my way to doing that. With these RN-MSN programs that don't award a BSN...is the student able to finish in 18 months? I love that in 18 months I'll have earned myself a BSN and an MSN (hopefully).
  9. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    No, it's not an option - you DO earn the BSN along the way.
    *** Yes, exactly as I mentioned. I was thrown off by your claim that the BSN was optional.

    I'm confused as to why you think this is a negative.
    *** WHAT!? I am confused as to hopw you arrived at that conclusion? I never said or indicated it was a negative. I only expressed regret that WGU does not offer an RN to MSN program. I wish they did. That in no way indicates that I view their other programs as a negative.
  10. Visit  klone profile page
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    First, I"m not the one who claimed it was optional.

    Secondly, I"m confused as to why you state that it's not an RN to MSN program.
  11. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    I certainly look at obtaining my BSN as part of my MSN program a huge plus!
    *** Yes I am sure you do. So would many others. However not everybody is at the same place in their education, or has the same goals as you.

    It enabled me to land a job that only hires BSN nurses.
    *** What kind of job will only hire BSN nurses but not nurses with MSNs? I suspect that any job you got with a BSN you could have also gotten with an MSN.

    I'm currently working in my dream job while still earning my MSN degree. I think a college that doesn't award a BSN is missing the mark.
    *** Well as I said not everybody has the same goals as you. I think it's great that we have a variety of different programs to suit the different needs of different people. For some an RN to MSN program may be the way to go. For other an RN to BSN to MSN program would better help them obtain their goals.

    My goal, after finishing my BSN in 6 months is to complete my MSN in a year and I'm definitely on my way to doing that. With these RN-MSN programs that don't award a BSN...is the student able to finish in 18 months?
    *** 18 months is very impressive. I am not sure. I only know a couple RN to MSN grads and neither one of them was in any hurry and it took both 4 semesters to finish. I don't know if they could have done it faster or not. Good luck to you!
    I love that in 18 months I'll have earned myself a BSN and an MSN (hopefully).
  12. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    First, I"m not the one who claimed it was optional
    .

    *** Ooops, my bad. You are right it was [COLOR=#003366]gypsyatheart who made that claim.

    Secondly, I"m confused as to why you state that it's not an RN to MSN program.
    *** Cause it's not.
  13. Visit  klone profile page
    0
    Right, I understand you keep saying that, but you haven't answered my question as to why you state it's not.
  14. Visit  RN*mommy profile page
    0
    Quote from PMFB-RN

    *** What kind of job will only hire BSN nurses but not nurses with MSNs? I suspect that any job you got with a BSN you could have also gotten with an MSN.
    I hope you don't feel picked on, I'm just trying to understand why NOT obtaining a BSN would benefit someone? Especially if the MSN program costs less and can be somewhat accelerated. If I'm able to complete my goal in the timeframe I've chosen, I'll have paid less than $10k for both my BSN and MSN.

    I didn't say the job didn't hire MSN nurses, they don't hire ADN. The fact that a RN-MSN would have taken me at minimum 18 months, most likely more time in a different RN-MSN program, it was very beneficial to earn my BSN on my path to obtaining my MSN. I was able to get the job in 6 months from beginning my degree program versus 18+ months. No doubt my new boss is ecstatic that I'm going on in my education to obtain a MSN.


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