MSN Capstone?

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    Hi, I am currently in WGU's RN-BSN program and am considering switching to their RN-MSN program. I was wondering if anyone knows if you have to be employed to do the MSN capstone course? The course description says the project should be something 'within the student's practice settings' or something to that effect. I'm currently unemployed and would like to finish my MSN while we can afford for me to be off from work. Anyone know anything about it? Thanks!
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  4. 0
    I just finished their BSN. There is no advantage for RN-MSN vs RN-BSN and then enrolling into MSN, you just end up with the commitment of taking MSN classes. My mentor suggested finishing the BSN first, and then you can seamlessly continue into MSN afterwards if you still have the energy. I don't believe being employed is a prerequisite with them, you can come up with a project topic and do your research in a setting of your choosing. Many nurses work in boring settings, like doctors' offices, or even insurance companies. Besides, maybe by the time you are ready for your capstone, you will be working. Good luck!
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    That's a good point about not all nurses working in settings that would be a good fit for a project lol. My mentor said the advantage of doing the RN-MSN is you don't have to repeat 2 classes that are in the RN-BSN program. However I do only have 3 classes left for my BSN and I like the idea of having it while getting my MSN so I should consider just doing it then the MSN. Thanks for your input!
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    I actually switched to the RN-MSN program recently from the BSN program simply because waiting until the end of my term to take the "repeat" classes wasn't something I really wanted to do. According to my mentor it is unusual for them to let you do that, however I guess I was lucky. So once I finished the MSN classes that are geared towards my BSN and my practicum I will get my BSN and still be on track working towards my MSN. Does that make sense? If I didn't do it that way I would have had to wait until the end of my term to start the MSN courses and delayed my receiving the BSN. WGU does reward a BSN if you're in the RN-MSN track when you finish the coursework for the BSN.
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    RN*mommy,

    Thanks for the info. I have a few questions if you have the time.

    1.What are the repeat classes?
    2.Are you saying there is no disadvantage to starting the MSN as long as you take the BSN classes first?
    3.What do you mean when you say you are first taking classes that are are geared toward your practicum?



    "So once I finished the MSN classes that are geared towards my BSN and my practicum I will get my BSN and still be on track working towards my MSN. Does that make sense? If I didn't do it that way I would have had to wait until the end of my term to start the MSN courses and delayed my receiving the BSN. WGU does reward a BSN if you're in the RN-MSN track when you finish the coursework for the BSN."
  8. 0
    Quote from livelovelaugh1
    RN*mommy,

    Thanks for the info. I have a few questions if you have the time.

    1.What are the repeat classes?
    2.Are you saying there is no disadvantage to starting the MSN as long as you take the BSN classes first?
    3.What do you mean when you say you are first taking classes that are are geared toward your practicum?

    "So once I finished the MSN classes that are geared towards my BSN and my practicum I will get my BSN and still be on track working towards my MSN. Does that make sense? If I didn't do it that way I would have had to wait until the end of my term to start the MSN courses and delayed my receiving the BSN. WGU does reward a BSN if you're in the RN-MSN track when you finish the coursework for the BSN."
    Sorry for my delay!

    1. I'm not 100% sure on the names of the repeat class(es). I think there are 2 and if I'm wrong please someone correct me. I know I lost one of my BSN courses when I switched programs and gained 3 MSN classes, however they aren't overly taxing and only have a few tasks to complete. I thinking nursing roles and something else were the two that are different if you're in the MSN program versus the BSN program. My understanding is these "bridge" classes count towards the competition of both your BSN and MSN if you're in the RN-MSN program. If you're in the BSN program you take different classes then have to take these MSN-geared courses if you switch the program later on...so essentially you do slightly more coursework if you complete your BSN and then switch to the MSN program. Does that make sense?

    2. I think number one kind of answers this question? If you start off in the MSN program, your mentor will automatically begin you on the path of working towards your BSN because they do grant you one once you have finished the coursework geared for that degree. The advantage is taking the classes that count for both the MSN and BSN.

    3. My comment was missing a comma. It should read: "So once I finished the MSN classes that are geared towards my BSN, and my practicum, I will get my BSN and still be on track working towards my MSN."
    The practicum is separate. The only course geared towards your practicum is HAT1, which you have to complete task one before beginning your practicum. So once I complete the MSN classes that count towards my BSN AND my practicum I will receive my BSN. My apologies for poor writing.

    I hope this helps!
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    Just a word of caution ... It can be very difficult to get access to a practice setting to complete a practicum (or capstone project) if you are not an employee there. If you are unemployed, you may have to search high and low to find a place to accept you as a student. With so many nurses in school, many of the best potential clinical sites are overwhelmed with requests from students for preceptorships, etc. Those who already work in a facility usually have an advantage.
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    The WGU practicum isn't a "clinical". Some states are regulated and therefore a bit different in what the requirements are, however for all intense purposes you basically choose a topic of concern in your community. You research the topic and have to log 90 hours minimum in meeting with people, attending seminars, conducting interviews and a whole host of other possible activities based on your topic. There is no classic shadowing a nurse or such involved, so it shouldn't be a problem if you aren't employed.
  11. 0
    Please clarify if you can. Does this mean the WGU has no "Clinical hours"? There is no hands-on, nurse shadowing in a real hospital setting? That may be a 'make or break' for me choosing WGU.
  12. 0
    Let me clarify I'm talking about the RN-BSN program when I say that no, WGU does not have "clinical" hours. Only the practicum with its 90 hour minimum. There is a prelicensure program which I don't know anything about.


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