Tough finding work?

  1. 1
    I just read this article in the Seattle Times today. http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/htm..._nurses11.html

    Reading it makes me nervous about what it will be like when I graduate. I am due to graduate from an AA program in June 2013. I would like to know how others' experience was finding work as a new grad in these recent times. Is it as bad as this article says? Worse? Better? I am really interested to know from those that did find work, what it was they thought gave them the edge to get the job. I really want to be a nurse and I'm nervous there just won't be the jobs out there for us new grads coming up.

    For those who are already working, does the place you're working at hire new grads?

    I am really hoping this thing turns around.
    lindarn likes this.
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  3. 12 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    I also read that article today. I have heard that this was the case, but have been in denial. Freaking out just a little over here... I am scheduled to start the ELMSN program at PLU, so I'll be getting my RN in late summer or early fall of 2013. I am freaked out a little. I will have way too much student debt to just not work for a year! I'm just hoping that the recession recedes faster than expected! I don't care that there will be a huge shortage again in 5-10 years. I need a job next year!!!!
    lindarn likes this.
  5. 1
    It really depends where you live, and the number of contacts you have. If you know someone, it may ease the job search. More importantly, you need to be flexible, regardless of your preferred area. Take whatever comes along, in order to get some experience.
    tokmom likes this.
  6. 0
    I moved to Washington State from California about 6 months ago. My LPN licensed was transfered within a couple of months, but it has been difficult finding pt/ft permanent work. I was able to get a couple of agency jobs, because this is where I have experience. You see, I graduated in 2007 and got my license in 08 and no one would give me any work in a clinic or hospital with at least 6 months of experience. I even offered to take a $5.00 an hour pay cut just to try and get my foot in the door, but that didn't get me a job either. The bad thing about agencies is that you don't always work. It is hit and miss. I have even been thinking about getting some other type of work to help pay the bills. By furthering my education, I thought I would get a great job and be set, but that didn't happen. It dissappoints me that I can not do the job I love and was trained to do. Best of luck to you!


    Quote from kuxiam
    I just read this article in the Seattle Times today. http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/htm..._nurses11.html

    Reading it makes me nervous about what it will be like when I graduate. I am due to graduate from an AA program in June 2013. I would like to know how others' experience was finding work as a new grad in these recent times. Is it as bad as this article says? Worse? Better? I am really interested to know from those that did find work, what it was they thought gave them the edge to get the job. I really want to be a nurse and I'm nervous there just won't be the jobs out there for us new grads coming up.

    For those who are already working, does the place you're working at hire new grads?

    I am really hoping this thing turns around.
  7. 0
    It's worse and keeps getting worse. I have 1 1/2 years of experience from another state and even that is not enough to land me a job. I moved to due to husband transfer! I apply to tons of positions and don't even get a nibble on my resume. And I have two Bachelor degrees, one being in Nursing.

    Here's my advice:
    1. Be willing to work in any hospital unit (we all have our ideal unit, but right now you should take anything because I guarantee it's better than no job!)

    2. Be willing to move to any state if that is a possibility for you. Lots of places that are not your ideal place to live actually are hiring. Example: Smaller towns in TX (not bigger ones)

    3. Apply to everything, once you have passed NCLEX is better because then it's on your resume, but ya apply to every job that doesn't require experience. Even if you don't like the type of unit or shift... you need to take what you can get and stick it out for 2 years if possible, minimum 1 year. And don't give up your job until you have another one.

    4. Prior to applying for jobs take: BLS and ACLS. And if you can afford it also take PALS and NRP... all CPR classes that will boost the resume.

    5. If you can afford the time and money continue on for you BSN or even Masters.

    I wish you the best of luck! Hope this helps and isn't too discouraging. It's a sad reality that our nursing schools lied and the job market is just not recovering. I hear not until 2020 when the older nurses are finally forced to retire. UG!
  8. 0
    It's very tough out there right now. I have been actively searching and applying for jobs since February. I have applied for over 200 postions and had 1 interview. The competition is tough. I didn't go to school here so I don't have any contacts or "in's" in the hospitals here. Might be taking myself back to Texas very soon. Good Luck!
  9. 0
    I am new to the area as well. I just recently graduated nursing school so for me it has been even more difficult. I have been applying since March. It seems like it all happened at once but I currently have 2 job offers and am waiting for an interview at another hospital. I don't have any "In's" here either so it is possible! Best of luck to everyone with the job search!
  10. 0
    Get a job at a hospital while you're in school... if you can't get a paid position, get a volunteer position. If you do well (paid or voluteer), you'll develop your reputation in the hospital. If you develop a good reputation, then your chances of getting a paid position will increase, regardless of what you did as a volunteer. Work as a nurse tech. Yes, the jobs are hard to come by, but if you make your self known to the hiring managers, (and not in an annoying way), they will be willing to help you. Saying or thinking "i'm in school and dont have time for work while im in school" is just an excuse. The reason I believe this is, A: a close friend of mine had 5 children and worked 20 hrs a week as a volunteer in the hospital while going through nursing school; B: there's always time to work if you want a job.

    Also, DO NOT expect to get a job just because you applied to 200 positions... I hate to say it, but if you have applied to 200 jobs and have only had 1 interview...it's not them, it's your resume. Fix your resume. Use your clinical time as experience. Many of the hospitals and LTC facilities use a computer system that pick out key-words in applicant's resumes... then with the computer-chosen resumes, they will choose who to interview.

    If the hospital is not hiring new grads, make them hire new grads. You say this is impossible. False. Call the recruiters on the telephone. DONT EMAIL...they will dismiss your inquiry. Find out who the recruiters are and call them. Their information isn't a secret. If they say "sorry, we dont hire new grads for non-resident positions," tell them you'd like to be notified when a residency opens. If you aren't a jerk and you sound enthusiastic, they WILL notify you.

    Also, if you dont know anyone and you dont have contacts in the area, then it's time to make yourself known. It is possible. Saying it's impossible is an excuse.

    Out of my class of 40 that just graduated, more than half have jobs...and most of them had ZERO experience.
  11. 2
    Quote from LalaJJB
    Get a job at a hospital while you're in school... if you can't get a paid position, get a volunteer position. If you do well (paid or voluteer), you'll develop your reputation in the hospital. If you develop a good reputation, then your chances of getting a paid position will increase, regardless of what you did as a volunteer. Work as a nurse tech. Yes, the jobs are hard to come by, but if you make your self known to the hiring managers, (and not in an annoying way), they will be willing to help you. Saying or thinking "i'm in school and dont have time for work while im in school" is just an excuse. The reason I believe this is, A: a close friend of mine had 5 children and worked 20 hrs a week as a volunteer in the hospital while going through nursing school; B: there's always time to work if you want a job.

    Also, DO NOT expect to get a job just because you applied to 200 positions... I hate to say it, but if you have applied to 200 jobs and have only had 1 interview...it's not them, it's your resume. Fix your resume. Use your clinical time as experience. Many of the hospitals and LTC facilities use a computer system that pick out key-words in applicant's resumes... then with the computer-chosen resumes, they will choose who to interview.

    If the hospital is not hiring new grads, make them hire new grads. You say this is impossible. False. Call the recruiters on the telephone. DONT EMAIL...they will dismiss your inquiry. Find out who the recruiters are and call them. Their information isn't a secret. If they say "sorry, we dont hire new grads for non-resident positions," tell them you'd like to be notified when a residency opens. If you aren't a jerk and you sound enthusiastic, they WILL notify you.

    Also, if you dont know anyone and you dont have contacts in the area, then it's time to make yourself known. It is possible. Saying it's impossible is an excuse.

    Out of my class of 40 that just graduated, more than half have jobs...and most of them had ZERO experience.
    I totally agree with what you said. I had to return to nursing after being out for almost 5 yrs. My CPR was expired, and nobody seemed to want to hire me. Being in my 40's I took the old fashioned way to get a job. I called recruiters on the phone and essentially sold myself to them. I did research on the facility and called back if I did not hear from them in 48 hrs. I had 3 interviews and 3 job offers within 2 weeks. Forget email..call them!
    lindarn and LalaJJB like this.
  12. 1
    I am having trouble finding an RN job as well, with over a year of experience! I am not familiar with Seattle, but I do know that many of the hospitals here have new grad residency programs. Check out the following places for residencies. This would be a great opportunity for you.

    Multicare.org
    Harrison Medical Center (Bremerton)
    NWHospital.org

    If you want to get ahead, apply for CNA/Nurse Tech positions and work a little while in school. It helped me SO much when I graduated.. I wasn't so "new" to nursing. Some facilities do not require you to have a CNA license.

    Good luck!
    lindarn likes this.


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