Is it easier to get a job as a New-grad RN with BSN?

  1. 0
    Hi guys..

    This is my first posting at allnurses.com so I am really excited. I heard from my college professor that a new grad with ADN degree will have harder time finding a job than a new grad with BSN degree. Is that true? I also heard that a new grad who just graduated from UW Seattle nursing had job lined for her even before she graduated.. I am considering going ADN route but that made me rethink about if I should really go for ADN instead of BSN.

    Does it make a difference if you have a BA degree from a four year school?

    I appreciate you opinions in advance...

    Thankx
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  3. 12 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    I'll be interesting to see what others may post. I recently finished an ADN program & some of us are having a hard time finding a job/getting interviews. It could very well be that we are being a bit selective in the depts we want. Although, I don't know of anyone who just graduated from a BSN program to compare to. I think many new RNs are having a rough time getting a job, it costs a lot to train a new grad. (regardless of the school they went to). Some of my classmates had a job lined up as well. They either worked in a dept as a CNA/CA, worked as a nurse tech (which I highly recommend to help get a possible foot in the door), or were just on top of applying (start applying like 2-3 months before you graduate). I don't know that any school lines up something for you so anyone can have something lined up.

    Couple of my classmates & I went right into a RN-BSN program too. If you want to save money, this is a good route. Hope to see others respond. Welcome to Allnurses! Lots of great info & resources here. And Good Luck to you!
  5. 0
    CGMedic, where are you doing your RN-BSN work? I'll have to do that too...
  6. 0
    "worked as a nurse tech (which I highly recommend to help get a possible foot in the door)"
    hi! this is probably a lame question, but i'm new to this... what is a nurse tech? i've never heard that term before! and how do you become one?
  7. 1
    Nurse Tech's are nursing students in their senior year that are hired on in the hospital. Where I work, they're utilized similarly to a CNA, but because of their training they can function with a larger scope under the supervision of a RN. For example, a nurse tech can give PO meds, insert foleys, start IVs, etc. It lets you get your foot in the door and some experience with skills under your belt.
    Mr Wright likes this.
  8. 0
    I am just bit worried because most urban city hospitals and metro city hospitals state in their job description that they prefer BSN over ADN. I know that it doesn't mean they won't hire ADNs but if there are two spots for new RN residency and 30 new graduates apply for that position, than BSNs have higher chance of landing that position. I am by no means downgrading the value of ADN or BSN but I am bit worried because I am starting ADN program this year. The state of Washington has over 20 ADN programs. Where do all new ADN nurses go when they graduate? Really sad...
  9. 0
    I am sad to admit that this is a new trend and a lot of ADN nurses might have to work on getting BSN or MSN regardless of their work experiences (there is an always exception). I will probably work on getting MSN once I graduate from ADN program but for now I am going to focus on finishing my degree and getting clinical experiences to make sure I can get a job once I graduate!!!
  10. 0
    I graduated two years ago from an ADN program. The market was a very different place. With no previous hospital work experience I was hired three months before graduation at a Seattle hospital. I sent in one application, had two interviews and was offered both positions. For today's market I can tell you the only new grads my floor has hired in the past year were already nurse techs on the floor. Some went to UW and SU, and others were ADN. No matter where you go to school these days I suggest having work experience as a nurse tech or NAC before graduation. Good luck to you!!
  11. 0
    All other things being equal then probably yes. However the MOST important thing is who you know. Compared to having an "in" at the hospital the degree you have is much less important. Fro example if your mom in a nurse manager there then you stand a very good chance of getting hired as a new grad regardless of what degree you have. Serving as a nurse tech and getting to know people there is much more important than having the right degree.
    I might also add that the preference for BSN new grads is pretty new. It has come and gone before. Also the preference for BSN only applied to new grads (at least in my area). After that the quality of experience, certification etc are MUCH more important.
  12. 0
    I would say getting your BSN helps but I've know people with BSN's have had to wait a year before getting into hospitals.


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