UDC's LPN Program

  1. 0
    Hello everyone,

    I took the pre entrance exam at UDC about three weeks ago and now I'm waiting on my results. I'm really searching for a good LPN program, please let me know if UDC is a good choice.
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  4. 0
    I have heard that UDC is ok, but I attend Comprehensive Health Academy and our passing rate right now is 88%. You can look on the website http://hpla.doh.dc.gov/hpla/lib/hpla...20doh%20LPN%22. I know that statistics are a little old, but the passing rates are still around the same. I would recommend my school to anyone, but it is a strenous program but good luck to you either way...
    Last edit by MamaGyrl on May 31, '08
  5. 0
    Thanks for the information.
  6. 0
    Quote from puddin757
    Hello everyone,

    I took the pre entrance exam at UDC about three weeks ago and now I'm waiting on my results. I'm really searching for a good LPN program, please let me know if UDC is a good choice.

    Hi,

    When does the UDC program begin and how long is it?
  7. 0
    Are you in the udc LPN program now. I would like to find out some information about the program- Thanks
  8. 0
    I'm in the UDC RN-BSN program. I did not get my A.A.S. from there but I work with a nurse who just graduated from there this past May. She did not think highly of it. In fact, she told me that they just lost their accreditation because their NCLEX pass rate was so low.

    She said the program and the faculty were disorganized and students had to teach themselves. Based on my limited experience so far, I can see it. The faculty has been there for a loooooong time and information (deadlines, direction, etc.) does seem a little hard to come by.

    BUT, if you are a DC resident you can't beat the price. You really don't want to come out of school in debt if you can avoid it.
  9. 0
    Is the pass rate low for the NCLEX-PN or NCLEX -RN because I'm supposed to start school there on Monday and I'm pretty worried. Other schools have already started or lost their accredition. Need Help with finding the right school for me.

    Stephanie
  10. 0
    CORRECTION: I spoke with the nurse in my department I mentioned in my earlier post and she clarified things. UDC lost the accreditation necessary to offer the 4-year BS degree only. That is why they only offer the 2-year Associate degree AND the RN-BSN program. The RN-BSN program does confer a BS degree at the end, but only RNs with at least one year of working experience can enter the program.

    They are fully accredited on the AAS level. Sorry if I caused you some undue stress.
  11. 1
    With regard to the LPN program -- it is only 7,000 dollars. From my comparative research regarding LPN programs in the DC metropolitan area, that is the best deal in town. Most other schools are 10 thousand or more. Their tuition is flat rate regardless of whether you are out of state, such as a Maryland resident. This is because it is technically part of the UDC community college and not the UDC flagship university. You can pay it off in 4 installments -- one installment for each of the 4 quarters. Books and supplies are additional. There are interesting articles about how the university divided itself. The tuition for the UDC community college went DOWN, while the tuition for the flagship portion of the university is rising.

    The LPN program has 2 tracks: either day classes or night classes. The day class program is 12 months and the night class program is 15 months -- longer because of the fewer hours in class at night. It is a rigorous 5 day a week program and you can plan on studying 3 hours each night. Now comes the hard part because I work a full time government job during the day. This will be like a second job. Incidentally, at this moment, their classes are located in a rented building right next to the Archives Metro station. That is very convenient for me since I work downtown anyhow and can actually walk to class, but I hear that if you have to drive, parking can be expensive.

    I just interviewed and was accepted. It took a while to pull all the papers together for the application packet: take their admissions exam, get security clearance, get my physical with their recommended agency (that cost me over $400), get 3 letters of recommendation, get my unopened college transcript, etc. I learned some interesting things when I spoke to the director. One is that this program has a national and international reputation. There are people from Canada and Oregon for example, who flew here to interview for this and will actually relocate here to be a student in this program. I thought they would accept almost anyone who met their qualifications, but it is actually competitive and she said they were setting limits as to the number of people they will accept.

    I also found out that my profile of a typical student was way off. I had this stereotype of a low income single mother looking to progress from nursing assistant to LPN. Actually, 85 percent of their student body already have college degrees. They have even admitted retired people. I am relieved to know that I will be surrounded by other adult learners. I am 48 years old and took an EMT course at GW the other year where all the students were about 20 years of age and that does make a difference. When you are in very different stage of life, you have different things to talk about during social time. They were talking about social events in their dorms and which sports bars they like to go drinking at. I am looking forward to the diversity and the international pot luck parties the LPN students often organize.

    One other comment: if you miss more than two classes (excused) during a quarter, you will be failed and will not be able to continue. You must also pass at a level above 75% for all of your academic work or you will be failed.
    Autumn1 likes this.
  12. 0
    Quote from veg
    With regard to the LPN program -- it is only 7,000 dollars. From my comparative research regarding LPN programs in the DC metropolitan area, that is the best deal in town. Most other schools are 10 thousand or more. Their tuition is flat rate regardless of whether you are out of state, such as a Maryland resident. This is because it is technically part of the UDC community college and not the UDC flagship university. You can pay it off in 4 installments -- one installment for each of the 4 quarters. Books and supplies are additional. There are interesting articles about how the university divided itself. The tuition for the UDC community college went DOWN, while the tuition for the flagship portion of the university is rising.

    The LPN program has 2 tracks: either day classes or night classes. The day class program is 12 months and the night class program is 15 months -- longer because of the fewer hours in class at night. It is a rigorous 5 day a week program and you can plan on studying 3 hours each night. Now comes the hard part because I work a full time government job during the day. This will be like a second job. Incidentally, at this moment, their classes are located in a rented building right next to the Archives Metro station. That is very convenient for me since I work downtown anyhow and can actually walk to class, but I hear that if you have to drive, parking can be expensive.

    I just interviewed and was accepted. It took a while to pull all the papers together for the application packet: take their admissions exam, get security clearance, get my physical with their recommended agency (that cost me over $400), get 3 letters of recommendation, get my unopened college transcript, etc. I learned some interesting things when I spoke to the director. One is that this program has a national and international reputation. There are people from Canada and Oregon for example, who flew here to interview for this and will actually relocate here to be a student in this program. I thought they would accept almost anyone who met their qualifications, but it is actually competitive and she said they were setting limits as to the number of people they will accept.

    I also found out that my profile of a typical student was way off. I had this stereotype of a low income single mother looking to progress from nursing assistant to LPN. Actually, 85 percent of their student body already have college degrees. They have even admitted retired people. I am relieved to know that I will be surrounded by other adult learners. I am 48 years old and took an EMT course at GW the other year where all the students were about 20 years of age and that does make a difference. When you are in very different stage of life, you have different things to talk about during social time. They were talking about social events in their dorms and which sports bars they like to go drinking at. I am looking forward to the diversity and the international pot luck parties the LPN students often organize.

    One other comment: if you miss more than two classes (excused) during a quarter, you will be failed and will not be able to continue. You must also pass at a level above 75% for all of your academic work or you will be failed.
    Thanks you gave me very helpful information that's very detailed


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