RN questions...

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    Hello, I have some questions about being an RN. I’ve been looking at some of the programs in the Hampton Roads area. Hopefully you guys can clear up some of my concerns….

    -Does it matter how you become and RN (through employers’ eyes?)
    -Is it true that a BSN nurse and an RN with an associate’s degree get paid the same from the start?
    -I already have a BSHA, can this be utilized as an RN?
    -Lastly, I hear that employers in the Hampton Roads area look down on RN students from MCI/ECPI….is this true?

    Thanks in advance!!
  2. 18 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    1. I'm not in HR so I can't tell you their POV for certain, but at my facility, I've seen diplomas, ADNs and BSNs from various schools. So I think as long as the school is accredited it really doesn't matter.

    Some facilties do require or prefer a BSN though. And keep in mind that Sentara, Bon Secours and Riverside all run their own nursing schools, so their graduates often (but not always) get priority for hiring at their respective facilities.

    3. No. To be an RN you have to graduate from an accredited nursing school and pass the NCLEX-RN exam. However, an ADN or accelerated BSN program may be a good option for you as you will probably have most of the gen ed and science prereqs out of the way because of your BSHA degree.

    Hope someone else can answer 2 and 4 (and maybe 1 a bit better) for you!
  4. 2
    Quote from um??
    -Lastly, I hear that employers in the Hampton Roads area look down on RN students from MCI/ECPI….is this true?
    Hey,

    This kind of frustrates me, not you the idea of this. I have a prior B.S. and my concentration is human resource management. It was frowned upon in school and when I became a technical recruiter for people to look down on private schools. The key reason is because private schools mirror public schools and it is considered ignorant in the recruiting industry to frown upon someone making money doing the same thing a public school does. Private schools have more funds available to have awesome lab equipment, to have nicer facilities, etc. Not only that but private schools cut out all the BS electives and philosophy classes public schools require. A private school does not care if you took 4 yeatrs of french in high school or if you take an art history class in college. ODU and VCA both have accelerated programs that MCI mirrors, I would like to mention. I can say from personal experience recruiting individuals in this area, Hampton Roads, that we loved our private school and public school candidates. Especially if the talent is military talent.

    I will say that I have attended Embry Riddle Aeronautical University for a AAS in Professional Aeronautics, minor management and then DeVry University for a BS in Technical Management, concentration HRM. I have done both online and in school classes. I am now a student at MCI for the RN program and it is INTENSE! I compare it to the military training I got for electronics in A-School. You have to dedicate your life to the program because you do 16 weeks of traditional college in 5 weeks. So I test everyday and we lecture on at least 1 chapter every class. Our learning lab is pretty awesome. We do clinicals just like every other school. The program is 16 months and $41,000. The difference between us and a public school is our school makes money, and a lot of it, off of us. I love my school, I love my professors, and I love what I am learning.

    I also want to mention that this stigma is attached to UoP. My DON and half of my professors are UoP graduates. My DON is currently working on her PhD from UoP according to my last professor.

    I can also say that through my VA and military contacts, my prior BS, and my 10 point veterans hiring preference I will have absolutely NO problem getting a federal job once I graduate.

    In closing I guess some things do not work for everyone. I have a strong network in the area so I know that once I obtain my RN Licensure I will have no problem finding a job. I also know plenty of the graduates from my school that had jobs before they graduated due to their externships. I hope this helps you in your decision. Good luck!
    as2633 and Meriwhen like this.
  5. 2
    Quote from um??
    Hello, I have some questions about being an RN. I’ve been looking at some of the programs in the Hampton Roads area. Hopefully you guys can clear up some of my concerns….

    -Does it matter how you become and RN (through employers’ eyes?)
    -Is it true that a BSN nurse and an RN with an associate’s degree get paid the same from the start?
    -I already have a BSHA, can this be utilized as an RN?
    -Lastly, I hear that employers in the Hampton Roads area look down on RN students from MCI/ECPI….is this true?

    Thanks in advance!!
    The best route to take for somebody starting out would be to shoot for a BSN degree from one of the traditional four year schools like ODU, Norfolk State, etc. A BSN will take you farther than an associates or a diploma will, but if time or money is an issue then getting your license and going to work is paramount, you can always go back and get the BSN later.

    I'm not sure that BSN nurses starting out make all that much more than a diploma or associates degree. What gets you the bucks is experience. If you have prior health care experience that is always positve. I'm not sure what the BSHA degree entails, most programs have pre-reqs for biology, chemistry, A&P 1 and 2 and micro as well as courses in english, psychology and a math requirement. Some programs like Sentara and MCI are looking for people to come in with 1.5 years of college credits including all the pre-reqs and walk out the door in 2.5 years with a BSN. Just keep in mind that not every school is fully accredited for the programs they offer. Sentara while a fine school, is accredited to offer a diploma, not a BSN and they wont get that accreditation till they graduate a class or two of BSN nurses. That may not affect your job search but may impact going on for further degrees. It's worth asking the question of the recruiters before you sign on the dotted line.

    I don't have any personal experience with MCI in this area, the only thing I can say with assurance is that they are quite a bit more expensive than the other options. Whether an employer would elevate somebody from a different program above them is pure speculation. I'm in level 3 (out of 6) at Riverside in Newport News which is a diploma program and for sure Riverside does not discriminate against its own grads when it comes hiring time. Ours is a well respected program and we do get lots of clinical time which is a big factor in how well you will do once you graduate. The AS programs offered by TCC and TNCC are also good, and are on the cheaper side compared to other programs, so they do have waiting lists. Sentara and Bon Secours are the other two hospital affiliated programs, both have transitioned to a BSN degree, but again, I would ask some probing questions first. Bon Secours has you travel one night per week up to Richmond for classes, that is what I last know about it, it may have since changed. The for profit schools include MCI and Fortis. I did know one lady that worked with my wife as an LPN and went to Fortis that did not have really good things to say about it. But she did pass the NCLEX on the first go around so that has to say something.

    Good luck, shoot me a PM if you have any specific questions I may be able to answer.

    Bob
    Meriwhen and TheCareerStudent like this.
  6. 0
    I agree with Bob's comments! I would definitely go for the BSN if, like he stated, time is not paramount. If it is for you, like in my case, UoP offers the MSN bridge program which is great. As soon as you pass you NCLEX you are eligible to begin. They have many different choices for their MSN program like combining with education, NP, or Healthcare admin. You only have to take 3 BSN classes, this is the bridge portion, and then you start the MSN. It is nice that we have a campus in VA Beach and that online is an option for a busy new RN. Also, if you are a military spouse or active duty you get a big tuition break.
  7. 0
    Thanks for your input guys. I would love to actually communicate with someone that graduated from MCI and pick their brain. Time is a factor and I do have a family to support…..so the 16 month program seems more logical. I’m still unsure of which route to take though. Keep the comments coming!!
  8. 0
    Quote from um??
    Thanks for your input guys. I would love to actually communicate with someone that graduated from MCI and pick their brain. Time is a factor and I do have a family to support…..so the 16 month program seems more logical. I’m still unsure of which route to take though. Keep the comments coming!!
    I will tell you that it is very hard when you have a family, but 100% doable. There are women who are dedicated and make it through but there are some who do not grasp the fact that this course is an intense amount of work. In our first mod we went from 30 original students to less then 15 of those original students. A few people who had previously failed rolled in to fill some of the gaps.

    My best advice is to stop by on a Monday-Thursday, around lunch time for a tour. This is the time when you will see actual students out and about on campus eating lunch, so it is a perfect time to talk to us. The admission advisers give out great info, but they do not always show the other side of the coin. Chat with lots of students, we are really honest. You will also get to see some of us in the skills lab working on dummies and actual hospital equipment.

    I hope that helps. Just do your homework and pick what is best for you and your family.
  9. 2
    Quote from um??
    Thanks for your input guys. I would love to actually communicate with someone that graduated from MCI and pick their brain. Time is a factor and I do have a family to support…..so the 16 month program seems more logical. I’m still unsure of which route to take though. Keep the comments coming!!
    If possible, I wouldn't get myself into a whole load of debt just to do an accelerated program. The job market for new grads is lousy here because there's so many nursing schools: every 3 months a new crop of new grads is pumped out.
    elkpark and TheCareerStudent like this.
  10. 0
    Quote from Meriwhen
    If possible, I wouldn't get myself into a whole load of debt just to do an accelerated program. The job market for new grads is lousy here because there's so many nursing schools: every 3 months a new crop of new grads is pumped out.
    I agree that a load of debt is not any good. But if you are military and have GI Bill benefits you are good to go. I am not paying a dime and since the college is yellow ribbon I will still not be paying a dime when the new laws take effect in August. Most of my classmates who are not military are getting financial aid which off sets their out of pocket costs to about $20,000, from what they have said. But I am sure every instance is different in that department. Financial aid will go over all that with you and break down exactly what you owe.

    Also if you are military, take advantage of your federal hiring preference and network! Networking on base will be your best asset, as well as at the VA.
  11. 0
    Another thing to consider is the possibility of going on to the next stage (namely a RN-BSN program). Not all schools in Virginia accept MCI credits for transfer. Since a BSN degree is considered essential for many employers, you will want to be sure that you will have the option to go further if you choose to.


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