NVCC or GMU

  1. 0
    Has anyone been through the ADN program at Northern Virginia Community College? I am trying to decide if I want to get my associates (have an MBA so I don't know if a BSN would be beneficial since other posters have said you only need to do that to get into Mgmt...) or going to GMU for the second degree BSN. I would really like some feedback on these two schools and whether or not they have high NCLEX pass rates.
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  5. 0
    Hello,

    I'll be interested in reading any responses to this posting as I'm in the same boat. I'm graduating with a BS in a couple of weeks. I'm looking at both NVCC and GMU nursing programs. I'm working on my prerequisites and hope to be accepted into a program next fall (2005). FYI, I went to the 2nd degree Nursing program information session at GMU a few weeks ago. We were told that it's very comptetive. They received around 250 applicantions for the 70 slots in the class that starts this fall (2004). I'm hoping that the NVCC program isn't as tough to get into. I should find out in a few weeks as I'm planning on attending the NVCC information session then.

    Corey
  6. 0
    Quote from d0ves
    Has anyone been through the ADN program at Northern Virginia Community College? I am trying to decide if I want to get my associates (have an MBA so I don't know if a BSN would be beneficial since other posters have said you only need to do that to get into Mgmt...) or going to GMU for the second degree BSN. I would really like some feedback on these two schools and whether or not they have high NCLEX pass rates.
    FYI

    GMU has a fast track program and you could get your BSN as fast as ADM at NOVA. NOVA grads have a higher pass rate on the NCLEX than GMU, but it is not that great of a difference (maybe 3-5%). I have a BSN from GMU. One area I thought needed improvement was the more clinical time. Either program will serve you well. I am glad I got the BSN because if you plan to practice in this metro area and you do not want to work hospital forever you will be limited without it. Or that is my finding. It may not be so for ever one else? Best Wishes
  7. 0
    I graduated from NVCC in May of 2009 and am currently in the RN to BSN bridge program at GMU for my BSN. I enjoyed the program at NOVA (only downfall was that the program from my standpoint seemed very disorganized and it was hard to get information from anyone!) I know that GMU has a fast-track program for people getting second degrees, and quite a few of them are in my classes currently. From what I've heard it's a TON of work thrown into 2 semesters (they'll graduate in May) and I believe it's only 1 class they take that has any clinical work at all. In my opinion that's not enough to really learn anything. At NOVA we had clinical every week of every semester and we really learned our stuff. The majority of us passed our NCLEX on the first try (and many of us did it in only 75 questions!) and that's because we really had our stuff drilled in our heads instead of us being primarily responsible for picking and choosing what we should know, like it seems to be at GMU. The people in my class seem very stressed with a lot of group projects to do, ontop of tests/quizzes, studying for NCLEX, social lives (Say goodbye to that right now!!) and anything else that may get in the way (work, kids, husband, dog, neighbors, mail man.. etc!)

    It's completely up to you what you want to do. My honest opinion would be to guage it on how much time you actually have to complete this. Would you rather do all this work in one year or in two?? yeah, at NVCC you only get an ADN, but as long as you pass your boards, you can work as an RN and make the same amount of money (or close to it!) and once you have your RN license, you can do what I did and go to GMU for a year and get your bachelors or even your masters with their RN-MSN program in ONE year! It's completely up to you, but for me, the stress of learning everything that we learned in 2 years in only 1 year would be WAY too much for me!! I thought 2 years was crazy to learn all that stuff.... I can't IMAGINE doing it in 1 year!!

    Hope this was at least semi-helpfull!
  8. 0
    You can find NCLEX pass rates on the Virginia BON website:

    http://www.dhp.virginia.gov/nursing/nursing_edprogs.htm

    Good luck, whatever you decide to do!
  9. 0
    Just to clarify...the GMU 2nd degree program has more than one clinical class (otherwise it would never be accredited!)...There are six: fundamentals/med surg, pediatrics, OB, psych, community health, and preceptorship (what ever unit you choose)...Also, to set things straight, the program is an entire year, not two semesters. Students graduate in August, not in May. While it is extremely stressful (and you need to kiss your social life goodbye for a year), the school prepares you well to be a nurse. NCLEX pass rates are generally on par with NVCC.

    While it is true that you get paid almost the same, having the BSN has its advantages. Attend an info session at both schools. Don't let misinformation from those who are not in the program inform your decision making.
  10. 1
    Quote from mchva
    Just to clarify...the GMU 2nd degree program has more than one clinical class (otherwise it would never be accredited!)...There are six: fundamentals/med surg, pediatrics, OB, psych, community health, and preceptorship (what ever unit you choose)...Also, to set things straight, the program is an entire year, not two semesters. Students graduate in August, not in May. While it is extremely stressful (and you need to kiss your social life goodbye for a year), the school prepares you well to be a nurse. NCLEX pass rates are generally on par with NVCC.

    While it is true that you get paid almost the same, having the BSN has its advantages. Attend an info session at both schools. Don't let misinformation from those who are not in the program inform your decision making.

    Yeah, sorry for the "misinformation"... wasn't intentional as some would seem to have you believe. NVCC graduates in May, the GMU program graduates in August... slip up on my part. As for the clinical info, I was going by what my fellow classmates were telling me (apparently I'm hanging with the slackers who are only know of one clinical... but for all I know they were speaking only of this one semester!) Sorry, thought I was being helpful but apparently wasn't. Please disregard my entire posting and refer all questions to mchva from now on!
    Cilantrophobe likes this.
  11. 0
    Both NVCC and GMU receive more applications than they have space. I generally encourage potential applicants to apply to more than one school. Then if multiple schools offer you admissions, then you are in the fortunate position to have a choice to make.

    Each year I encounter many students who apply to only one program, and then are very disappointed if they are not accepted by that one program. If you really want to be a nurse, do not "put all your eggs in one basket".
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    I would agree, apply to more than just 1 school. 1 has to figure in a lot of factors, $$$$, think nvcc cost me grand total of around $6000 (not including books, but dont need a pile of them) so yes a BSN may pay a tad more at first (not always the case) but schooling costs may be a lot more. And most hospitals give you educational $$$ than one could use to pay for ur BSN, MSN, etc It t is highly suggested one go one to gain higher education.
    One just had to be motivated to keep on with the education,lol

    I'm not so sure if the NCLEX pass rates mean a whole lot, I think its more on the individual if they pass or fail,more so than the actual school. The keys to passing the Nclex is study study study, tons of questions, and a program like KAPLAN helps too. It would be interesting to take 100 people who have never taken any nursing classes, make them attend kaplan and give them Saunders ncelx book, and say 2-3 months to study and see how the results turn out,lol
  13. 0
    Good points, Flames.

    One last thing to consider -- Hospitals may not pay for all of the next degree. This year with budget cutbacks, several dozen hospitals in Virginia have eliminated tuition reimbursement (or cut benefits to 50% of what was provided in 2008). Several students who were accepted to UVA for graduate study RN-BSN, MSN, DNP) had to turn down offers this year because their employers eliminated tuition support (or cut it to only $1000 per year).

    It is hard to know what tuition benefits will be like in several years.


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