Traveler with minimal experience as an RN

  1. hi i know u all are sayin that travel nursing isnt wise without having any experience however i was wondering...i have been an lpn on a labor and delivery floor for two yrs now and i do the same exact work as any RN does...i work in the nursery..postpartum...antepartum and scrub c-sections as well. I will be an RN in may of 2006 and i want to travel after getting my 2 months of labor training. Do you guys still think it isnt wise for me to do it? I have dealt with all the types of nurses u guys have talked about and i thin k ican handle those types of situations well.. having said that...does anyone know of an agency that would take my experience into consideration even if its not "RN experience"? Thanks!!
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   suzanne4
    Sorry, but you will not find a hosptal that will accept you with those credentials. Even though you may have been doing similar things that the RN is as an LPN, it still doesn't come with the same legal responsibilities.
    The reputable agencies want minimum of one year experience as an RN before they will hire. You may come acorss one that will wiht only six months experience, but you will not find a facility that will accept you in a specialty area without it. You are only going to be jepordizing your license, and you have worked too hard to get it. There is a reason that the hospitals want that much experience. Scrubbing a C-section is not the same as having labor experience, and two months again will not give you enough experience.

    Labor and Delivery units that use travel nurses are now requiring 3 to 5 years in that role as an RN, before being accepted.

    Unfortunately, the time that you worked as an LPN does not count towards time as an RN.
  4. by   KatieBell
    I agree with SUzanne (which I always seem to do!

    In addition, it seems unprofessional to get two months Labour training from an institution and then just leave. Many places now have their nurses sign an agreement to stay for a period of time after getting this training.

    As a traveler, you are essentially stepping in and saying you can handle MANY, if not all, situations possible within your specialty. Training over two months will not expose you to that many situations. See, your preceptor will try to get you to experience as many difficult births as possible, but depending on where you work, etc, there may not be certain things seen in 2 months. If you are working 36 hours this is only 24 shifts.

    I oriented in the ED, over 6 weeks, and for the first year, I was constantly encountering new stuff that we had not seen during orientation. At those points, I needed some help from the Charge Nurse, the Attending doc, or another nurse. I had resources. As a travel nurse, occasionally the "team" doesn't want to help out the traveler and this puts the patient in danger. Orientation is only the beginning in a specialty.
    I know this seems discouraging, and I have read your other posts, you seem like you really want to travel, but to have a good, successful travel career, it is really so so important to have a few years of practice under your belt.
  5. by   Momof4greatkids
    I would strongly suggest at least one year experience before traveling. In my experience travelers are lucky to get a shift or 2 orientation. Many times they have to step right in and handle any assignment. After only 2 mos. you just won't get enough experience. I have worked with travel nurses who had misrepresented their work experience. It made 13 weeks of h*** for everybody.
    I think you will be much more prepared and happy if you get more experience under your belt before traveling.
  6. by   mytoon38
    I had worked for 25 years as an LPN then got my RN. I had done an assignment at a hospital as an LPN, and the Nurse Manager knew I was finishing my RN soon. About a month after I got my RN, the Nurse Manager from the hospital called my travel agency and asked if I had got my RN yet. They told her yes, and she asked for me to come back here. I only had one month as an RN when she brought me here, and this is my 3rd contract now as an RN. So it CAN happen. I know this is not the norm, but if someone knows you are qualified, and knows a Nurse is a Nurse, it can happen!
  7. by   pearldora
    Quote from mytoon38
    I had worked for 25 years as an LPN then got my RN. I had done an assignment at a hospital as an LPN, and the Nurse Manager knew I was finishing my RN soon. About a month after I got my RN, the Nurse Manager from the hospital called my travel agency and asked if I had got my RN yet. They told her yes, and she asked for me to come back here. I only had one month as an RN when she brought me here, and this is my 3rd contract now as an RN. So it CAN happen. I know this is not the norm, but if someone knows you are qualified, and knows a Nurse is a Nurse, it can happen!
    Wow! I'd be thrilled to welcome an RN w/ 17 yrs of LPN/LVN experience! Congratulations on getting your degree. That's perserverance! I'm happy for you and can understand why that hospital "grabbed you up" the minute they got the chance! Aren't you glad ($$) you followed through? Good luck in your "new" career!
  8. by   pearldora
    Quote from pearldora
    Wow! I'd be thrilled to welcome an RN w/ 17 yrs of LPN/LVN experience! Congratulations on getting your degree. That's perserverance! I'm happy for you and can understand why that hospital "grabbed you up" the minute they got the chance! Aren't you glad ($$) you followed through? Good luck in your "new" career!
    Oops! My bad - 25 years! All the better!
  9. by   suzanne4
    Quote from mytoon38
    I had worked for 25 years as an LPN then got my RN. I had done an assignment at a hospital as an LPN, and the Nurse Manager knew I was finishing my RN soon. About a month after I got my RN, the Nurse Manager from the hospital called my travel agency and asked if I had got my RN yet. They told her yes, and she asked for me to come back here. I only had one month as an RN when she brought me here, and this is my 3rd contract now as an RN. So it CAN happen. I know this is not the norm, but if someone knows you are qualified, and knows a Nurse is a Nurse, it can happen!
    Big difference is that you already had a history with that agency, and the facility. Much different if you do not. If you are new to that agencyy, they want at least one year of experience, and for the OB arena, especially, many facilities are now demanding at least five years of experience.

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