Skype Interview with Cruise Line - page 3

I have just gotten the opportunity to interview via Skype for a cruise ship nurse position. I have never used Skype before, let alone have an interview that was not in person. I plan on doing a few practice trials with my family... Read More

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    I had dinner tonight with the director of OB/peds at a medium sized hospital (not my specialty area, nor my assignment hospital). She mentioned a bad traveler just hired by one of her managers and wished she could do Skype interviews as she believes she gets a lot from body language. Not practical to do at this point - she say if she doesn't interview presented travelers in 8 hours, they have taken another assignment already. Cruise ships have their pick, and can afford to demand a video interview that is still technically difficult for most people.

    She did do one Skype interview of a long distance manager candidate at the candidate's request. In her units, the docs like to participate in the interview process for managers so they all gathered together for interview. When the candidate came online, she was wearing a t-shirt and sweatpants! What an error in judgment for someone wanting a manager job. Needless to say, she was seriously considered.

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  2. 1
    So this is my experience. I am currently on a cruise ship right now. They did do a SKYPE interview and it is the head doctor from the company that gives you TNCC and ACLS megacode senarios and they want to see how you react to them. At one point I motioned a "sweeping movent" to suggest clearing the airway and the doctor said to his scribe "note he used a sweeping motion to clear the airway." Its a good tool that I think most companies will eventually go to....we convey 90 percent of communication through body language.

    As for cruise nursing what can I say. If you love paperwork, clinic work and more paperwork than this is for you. I come from a ER background and it is too boring and I feel more like a secretary than anything else. The rooms are smaller than prison cells, the food is well **** and most the crew hate their jobs. The company I am with make the nurses on call 24 hours so there is a ZERO tolerance for any alcohol and you are not allowed to go to the crew bar even to just hang out. Also you are an officer so you always are in uniform and are really restricted in your movements. In the last 3 weeks I have only been able to get off the ship once so Im a little bitter right now and wont be returning to this job.

    It would be better to work a fastaff job and just pay for a cruise so you can actually have fun on it becuase let me tell you cruise ship nursing is NOT FUN, very serious and the nurses always get the brunt of the crap from the staff captain, lead doctor and even the captain sometimes. My coworker got called to the bridge 3 times her first week and quit week 2. Another american just quit after 3 weeks. I am putting in 70-85 hours a week and there is no overtime just salary rate. In my opinion it was set up for 3rd world workers that are willing to do that kind of hours for very little pay if you do the math.

    I put a lot out there but thats that.

    M
    icuRNmaggie likes this.
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    Quote from mattfro60
    I put a lot out there but thats that.

    M
    Just curious, are you with one of the "major" lines cruising out of a North American port? Have you ever worked with any other line?
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    I took the advice of others and "practiced" a few days before-hand to make sure that lighting, clothing, etc. looked ok. The actual interview went well, it was much like the generic interview you would have with an HR recruiter. At the end, I was asked to interview with the Medical Director the following week.

    The Medical Director ran through a few scenarios, some of which were pretty intense! The combination of my EMS and ICU experience really worked well, although I leaned heavily on my EMS experience.

    Immediately afterwards, I was offered a position that starts in a few months and was told which ship I would be assigned to. There is a huge amount of paperwork that needs to be completed as well as a VERY detailed physical exam that I must have completed by my PCP (I believe I will get reimbursed for this once I board the ship).

    I have accepted the position, but I'm looking for the answers to a few questions that I'm still fuzzy about. I know the company does not deduct taxes from their employee's paychecks, so I need to figure out how I end up filing my taxes at the end of the year. I'm also unclear on what passenger areas are off limits to "officers" (since a nurse is an officer) during their time off. I don't want to end up being confined to my cabin-- some outside time would be nice!

    The itinerary for the ship that I was assigned to is fantastic! It will take me to places I have dreamed of seeing (even if only from through a window), but would never be able to visit otherwise.

    Thanks, all, for your words of wisdom!



    Mattfro-- I'd like to pick your brain about some of the questions that I have, but you don't have enough posts for me to PM you.
  5. 0
    Hopefully they will provide a 1099 form for the IRS. If not, you will need to keep careful track as it is all reprtable income tax. You will add a schedule C to your return. Self employment taxes take a big bite at 15.3% of your income (after any business expense such as travel to the ship). You are supposed to file and pay estimated taxes quarterly.

    Congrats on the cool job! To paraphrase our president, "you are attractive enough."
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    When I appplied for my first RN position I was in Baltimore and the job was in Georgia. We did the interview via skype and it was video. It gave me a chance to see them and for them to see me. I thought it was a great inexpensive way for me to interview.

    Quote from NedRN
    What would be your theory then to require a video interview? Never happens for the placement of over 50,000 travel assignments every year by hospitals dependent on passing close regulatory scrutiny on the clinical abilities and performance of their contingent staffing.
  7. 0
    There is a lot more risk in hiring a permanent employee versus a travel nurse who will only be there for 13 weeks. Among other things, just the relocation pay and hiring bonuses can add up as well as having to live with them for years to come. I've been traveling now for 17 years and have not been asked once to do a video. Heck, a lot of the time they don't even want to interview you - they can tell from your work history, your skills checklist, and your references if you have the skills they need.

    That's a lot harder to do with a new grad of course.
  8. 0
    Quote from NedRN
    There is a lot more risk in hiring a permanent employee versus a travel nurse who will only be there for 13 weeks. Among other things, just the relocation pay and hiring bonuses can add up as well as having to live with them for years to come. I've been traveling now for 17 years and have not been asked once to do a video. Heck, a lot of the time they don't even want to interview you - they can tell from your work history, your skills checklist, and your references if you have the skills they need.

    That's a lot harder to do with a new grad of course.
    A cruise ship nurse is not a typical travel nurse position, however. You're comparing apples and lasagna here....
  9. 0
    Yup, for the reasons I pointed out earlier. Customer satisfaction is much more important to a for profit cruise line than it is for a captive audience hospital. Clinically I don't see a bit of difference. Perhaps an added epidemiology component that ED nurses don't usually deal with, but even on a cruise ship it would be the doc dealing with ship wide orders.
  10. 0
    Quote from NedRN
    Clinically I don't see a bit of difference. Perhaps an added epidemiology component that ED nurses don't usually deal with, but even on a cruise ship it would be the doc dealing with ship wide orders.
    It might be the doc giving the ship-wide orders, but the NURSES would be the ones carrying out those orders in the vast majority of cases, no? Or do you actually think that the physicians are the ones calling crew members who are past due for their TB test or tetanus booster shot?


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