new grad travel nurse??

  1. Hi all ...I just graduated and am having a hard time finding a job believe it or not. RN. Would also like to check out calif again and it seems like they have alot of dayshift travel jobs. I have childcare issues of course.... single parent.

    Anyway - providing I could get the ex to approve a move out of state even temporary...(required by law before removing kids from the state)... I'm thinking about travel nursing to calif.

    Any thoughts on new grads doing travel (negative/positive)...any thoughts on best new grad agency? Best place to work new grad in the LA area?

    Thanks in advance.
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  2. 22 Comments

  3. by   777RNThatsMe
    I should say or any other area of calif..not just LA
  4. by   tariqmomma
    Agencies only hire nurses with at least one year experience. They hire with experience because the hospitals expect the nurses to already know what they are doing with little orientation.
  5. by   777RNThatsMe
    thats interesting b/c I've read elsewhere (vague statements) that there are agencies that hire new grads - I just don't know who they are. Basic med surg nursing, I could do. There are lots of new grads who don't get preceptorships basic med surg (though it's not the ultimate way to start for sure).
  6. by   traumaRUs
    Travel nurses get little to no orientation - you really are setting yourself up to fail if you do travel nursing as a new grad. And..to be honest, I would question the agency that would accept new grad travel nurses.
  7. by   nightingale
    It can not be oversaid, and you will find a lot of threads on the topic, do not risk your license, the patients safety, and the reputation of the facility you are working with.

    If you need help with navigating this Bulletin Board, try visiting ANu. Click on the ANU link in my signature line. If you need more help feel free to PM me (also a link in my signature line).
  8. by   bagladyrn
    Quote from 777RNThatsMe
    thats interesting b/c I've read elsewhere (vague statements) that there are agencies that hire new grads - I just don't know who they are. Basic med surg nursing, I could do. There are lots of new grads who don't get preceptorships basic med surg (though it's not the ultimate way to start for sure).
    As others have said, please don't do this to yourself! The fact that you think you could step right into a "basic med surg" position with no training or orientation says to me that you have no clue what you'd be getting into! (Not an insult to you - it's only in retrospect we can know these things)
    An agency or hospital that would accept a new grad as a traveler is generally very desperate (makes you wonder why) or willing to put you, your license and your patients at risk.
  9. by   777RNThatsMe
    I have heard read that there are some longer assignments (18 mo's ..a year..etc) in travel nursing.... and those people consider new grads on those assignments -- one would imagine that there was some type of training/orientation involved in those....but I've also read that you have to read contracts very carefully.
  10. by   elkpark
    While the travel agencies may be willing to sign you up with only a year of experience or even as a new grad, many of the hospitals specify that they will only accept travelers with a minimum of 3 (or more) years experience. Hospitals pay a huge amount of money for travelers, and they expect, for that amount of $$$, to receive a seasoned "pro" who is ready to walk onto the unit and do the job -- travelers get minimum orientation, often just one or two shifts, and are expected to be ready to function independently. If the hospital wanted to put the time and effort into orienting a new grad, they could just hire a new grad ...

    I strongly agree with the other posters who have commented that, even if you can find 1) an agency that is willing to sign you as a new grad and 2) a facility that is willing to accept you (as a traveler) as a new grad, it would be a v. risky thing for you to do and, IMHO, a serious mistake. The agencies are looking to make money for themselves, not look out for your best interests and professional "growth & development" as a graduate nurse. This cannot be said too often: No one is going to look out for your license but you, so you had better do a good job of it yourself!

    Best wishes.
  11. by   777RNThatsMe
    Thanks for the info. Unfortunately I was just in a job (and quit after a week) where the "preceptorship" turned out to be a real joke. They basically were just there to answer questions you may have and the rest was up to you. Problem is, this was not a hospital per say, a different facility that I was unfamiliar with (though each hospital has it's own policies and schedules I'm sure ...)..... but it was also an area of nursing I was not familiar with /had not been exposed to before and when they said preceptorship for 10 weeks I expected that. Wasn't the case. Turned out the preceptors didn't get asked - they were told they'd do it -- on top of which no extra bonus or pay toward it's completion. No wonder. And this was not travel nursing this was a regular job.

    Now I'm having trouble finding a dayshift in my area; don't see many relocation (well, no relocation ) packages for new grads where I'd consider going .... (Calif etc or even in western WA).... and I have to have days b/c of childcare /school issues - single parent. So I'm considering days as a travel (should they have some type of real orientation type of thing) b/c frankly I need to get to work and frankly, I'm tired of living where I am. So although one risks their license in traveling.....by being unfamiliar with policy of the facility etc and/or from not having enough experience...one can also risk their license on "regular staff" jobs as I've quickly found out. I have seen lots of junk just in clinicals alone from docs...where a nurse if they followed said doc they would risk their license..yes..we have to watch out for our own... I hear that completely. That said - I have a family to support and a desire to leave this area...but heck can't even find a dayshift here. I see tons and tons and tons of dayshifts for travelers. Well...even a staffing agency would be fine w/me should they have the right position (DAYS) in the right area.

    I know that sometimes travelers get hired on at the facilities too - and in the past even found my own secretarial jobs that way more than once....being offered a job as a temp... contracts bought out etc..to stay.... and figured hospitals may be finding their nurses that way as well on some occasions......
  12. by   nightingale
    Quote from 777RNThatsMe
    Thanks for the info. Unfortunately I was just in a job (and quit after a week) where the "preceptorship" turned out to be a real joke. They basically were just there to answer questions you may have and the rest was up to you. Problem is, this was not a hospital per say, a different facility that I was unfamiliar with (though each hospital has it's own policies and schedules I'm sure ...)..... but it was also an area of nursing I was not familiar with /had not been exposed to before and when they said preceptorship for 10 weeks I expected that. Wasn't the case. Turned out the preceptors didn't get asked - they were told they'd do it -- on top of which no extra bonus or pay toward it's completion. No wonder. And this was not travel nursing this was a regular job.

    Now I'm having trouble finding a dayshift in my area;

    don't see many relocation (well, no relocation ) packages for new grads where I'd consider going .... (Calif etc or even in western WA)....

    and I have to have days b/c of childcare /school issues - single parent. So I'm considering days as a travel (should they have some type of real orientation type of thing) b/c frankly I need to get to work and frankly, I'm tired of living where I am. So although one risks their license in traveling.....by being unfamiliar with policy of the facility etc and/or from not having enough experience...one can also risk their license on "regular staff" jobs as I've quickly found out. I have seen lots of junk just in clinicals alone from docs...where a nurse if they followed said doc they would risk their license..yes..we have to watch out for our own... I hear that completely. That said - I have a family to support and a desire to leave this area...but heck can't even find a dayshift here. I see tons and tons and tons of dayshifts for travelers. Well...even a staffing agency would be fine w/me should they have the right position (DAYS) in the right area.

    I know that sometimes travelers get hired on at the facilities too - and in the past even found my own secretarial jobs that way more than once....being offered a job as a temp... contracts bought out etc..to stay.... and figured hospitals may be finding their nurses that way as well on some occasions......
    There are lots of relocation packages too and if you insist on days then hold out for that. University affiliated hospitals will be great teaching hospitals (usually) or you can try Magnet Hospitals that have high Nursing standards.

    You really need to listen to what YOU have just said. Knowingly going into a situation that is unsafe is so dangerous. Just because you saw wrong action does not mean it is okay to compound it with a Nurse who is unable to identify the exact correct way AND to stand your ground with a health care professional when you speak from KNOWLEDGE that their action may harm a patient.

    Working nights, when I graduated, was "paying your dues" where I came from. I was GRATEFUL for the slower pace, a chance to read the charts, ask questions from more experienced Staff (including RT, CNA's, and Nurses). I had a Nanny four days a week; lucky me, but I paid for her with working an extra day a week.

    Please do not take this as harsh. We really care about your progress, "YOU are the next generation" and may be caring for me when I need it. Please be there with an active license and please take the time to learn the profession safely.
    Last edit by nightingale on Sep 1, '06
  13. by   inspir8tion
    Hi. I am a new grad working in a teaching hospital in California and my preceptorship is pretty much the same as yours was. It is getting better, but the first two weeks were sheer hell. I want to suggest, since you are willing to 'relocate' for 18 months, that you just apply for a job in California, or wherever you want to live, and work there for as long as you want. Then you can move on if you wish. That way you would be hired as a new grad and I know in California we are desperate for nurses. Lots of openings. I have a colleague of mine (who graduated with me in May 06) that is getting a $5000 sign on bonus and over $30 an hour as a new grad at a hospital in Merced, CA. Some hospitals also provide day care. It is worth doing the research! Good luck.
  14. by   trvlnRN
    I have to agree with all the other experienced nurses here. I have worked as a traveler for years. And as always...most of my travel assignments offer at least three days of orientation. However....in all my travel assignments I've taken thoughout the years....I think I only had a full orientation once. What you are not aware of is that the jobs that are willing to pay for a traveler are there because they have some problems retaining staff or hiring staff and usually they are short more than just one nurse and need a traveler to try to bridge the gap. On most of my jobs I have literally "hit the deck running" and as an experienced RN....I've been in several situations where my license and patient safey were at risk. I've had to stand up to the housing rep, or clinical administrator and my agency...and basically tell them what I would and would not allow. As a new nurse would you even recognise a dangerous situation? Recognise an arrhythmia, or s/s of complications of a certain type of medication, etc. Would you be aware when the staffing situation became unsafe? Unusual complications of various medical conditions? No. This can't be taught in school and these are things you learn on the job. I can't tell you how much I learned my first year out of nursing school! It was amazing. I took my first job (night shift) in a cardiac step down unit...and crossed over to float in the ICU. I can't tell you how much I've learned working as a traveler. I can't share with you all the experiences....good and bad...that I've had as a nurse. I can't share with you the type of situations that I've been placed in as a traveler. I can't share with you that every job I interview for (yes...I interview them...they can call it an interview for me...but in reality...I'm interviewing them)...I learn new questions to ask about their staffing, practice, etc....experience from prior travel assignments that I'd like to avoid again! I'm always watchful for my license!!!! Can't stress that enough! As a nurse.....Your number one job is to watch out for your patients, their safety, and your nursing license. And you will find this a challenge over and over again throughout your career! Yea...there are lots of travel assignments out there...but typically...when a job comes available...they are so desperate...and so short....or have so many problems they need someone very experienced to help fill in the gaps. Travel assignments are TOUGH! And you never know what you are walking into until you are there. I've had managers....lie to me....time and time again in the interviews. The agencies will make it sound so nice. But they don't know. And there are only a few good agencies who will back you when you need them the most. I seriously doubt any of these agencies would consider hiring a new grad. I graduated at the top of my class. I had lots of hospital experience before I graduated and did most of my clinicals in the ICU. Yet...as much as I thought I knew and as well prepared as I thought I was with my BSN from a small private school. I would have never been prepared for a travel assignment right out of school. I'm strongly encouraging you to consider other options for your first job even though they may not seem as attractive. I know this is not what you want to hear....but I'd hate to see you loose your license...or wind up in a big lawsuit. Perhaps you can "temporarily" take a night shift position...hire some day care. There are typically lots of job openings at night....you can be selective....choose a job that is going to give you the best experience. Perhaps transfer to a specialty field within the first year...ie ER, etc. Then after you have experience...try some travel. You will be glad you went that route. Please listen to what all the nurses in this forum are taking the time to tell you and trying to share with you things that we unfortunately can't put down in an email. Protect your nursing license!

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