Know of any Crisis travel jobs in houston,Florida?

  1. Does anyone know any good crises travel nurse companies to call to get jobs in the houston or florida areas? Ive heard they pay really well but ive never heard which companies have them. I am about to finish my current travel assignment next week and im not under contract after that yet. I currently have a texas license so houston would be best but is it too late to try and get crisis jobs in houston? And does anyone know which companies have the crisis jobs? How long does it take to get the florida nurse license if ur not compact? Thanks.
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   NedRN
    Good? Nope. Fastaff is the largest rapid response company.
  4. by   NedRN
    After Katrina came through, the LA BON was closed for weeks. So volunteer nurses were unable to come since they had no ability to practice legally. After Katrina, LA instituted a practice whereby in an emergency, you could get a temp license just by faxing in a form that would cover you. Florida may have some process like that, but you can otherwise forget about working there.

    I've never seen a big need for contingent staff in disasters.

    If you think about what happens in these disasters, medical teams from government agencies and the National Guard come in to assist. NGOs also come in with staff. There are also volunteer groups and lots of nurses do volunteer but those are unpaid. Huge needs to transport stranded residents to safety, not so much for outside nurses. Transport was really big in Houston.

    In Florida, millions evacuated. So many fewer people needing medical assistance. Many hospitals closed and will not reopen anytime soon. In both Florida and Houston, hospitals that are undamaged or at least able to be partly open will use their own staff. There may be fewer available staff (who are dealing with their family and property issues), but in most departments other than emergency and critical care (if you can't ship), there won't be a lot of needs.

    No harm in checking around, but I don't think you will have many opportunities to make big money in a disaster as a nurse like you might in some strikes. Speaking of strikes, one rationalization that workers often state is that "someone has to take care of the patients". Disaster situations like this make it clear how completely false that is. All those Florida hospitals had no trouble shipping all their patients up state or out of state to other hospitals. If there were no strike workers, hospitals would have to ship, or negotiate in good faith.

    If you are willing to volunteer, you will be able to assist. Try a volunteer group but most will not be able to scale up for more volunteers. Many people in all walks of life just show up in disaster areas.
  5. by   Ab2ayleene
    Thanks for the info. Ill keep that in mind
  6. by   Ab2ayleene
    Ill check them out. Thanks!
  7. by   Wolf at the Door
    Yes, I know several companies that were paying high right for Houston. Mainly HCA but you already have to be in there system as staff or traveler with Healthtrust(formally known as Parallon). You needed ICU, NICU or ER exp. There was a lot of companies providing false info about having Houston relief jobs just to collect profiles. A few are on facebook doing the same thing for Florida. So lame of them.
    Last edit by Wolf at the Door on Sep 11
  8. by   gcupid
    Quote from NedRN
    After Katrina came through, the LA BON was closed for weeks. So volunteer nurses were unable to come since they had no ability to practice legally. After Katrina, LA instituted a practice whereby in an emergency, you could get a temp license just by faxing in a form that would cover you. Florida may have some process like that, but you can otherwise forget about working there.

    I've never seen a big need for contingent staff in disasters.

    If you think about what happens in these disasters, medical teams from government agencies and the National Guard come in to assist. NGOs also come in with staff. There are also volunteer groups and lots of nurses do volunteer but those are unpaid. Huge needs to transport stranded residents to safety, not so much for outside nurses. Transport was really big in Houston.

    In Florida, millions evacuated. So many fewer people needing medical assistance. Many hospitals closed and will not reopen anytime soon. In both Florida and Houston, hospitals that are undamaged or at least able to be partly open will use their own staff. There may be fewer available staff (who are dealing with their family and property issues), but in most departments other than emergency and critical care (if you can't ship), there won't be a lot of needs.

    No harm in checking around, but I don't think you will have many opportunities to make big money in a disaster as a nurse like you might in some strikes. Speaking of strikes, one rationalization that workers often state is that "someone has to take care of the patients". Disaster situations like this make it clear how completely false that is. All those Florida hospitals had no trouble shipping all their patients up state or out of state to other hospitals. If there were no strike workers, hospitals would have to ship, or negotiate in good faith.

    If you are willing to volunteer, you will be able to assist. Try a volunteer group but most will not be able to scale up for more volunteers. Many people in all walks of life just show up in disaster areas.
    There's no need to rationalize working a strike. It's not like those nurses are seeking justification for an egregious crime. All you have to do is have the ability to critically think. Just because you can do something doesn't necessarily mean you should.

    Would it be prudent to transfer a huge population of patient's to other possibly all ready over burdened facilities? What about infection control? What about ICU acuity patient's and people with multiple comorbidities? What about time sensitive emergencies? The hospitals are located in that area for a reason. I'm pretty sure there is a need. Would you be okay to know that you or your (mom,dad,sister,brother etc) are experiencing stroke like symptoms but had to be shipped to a hospital much farther away by EMS bc of nurses striking and now you or they suffer from huge life altering deficits when at first maybe you or they could have been back to working fine without deficits in a month?
  9. by   NedRN
    Quote from gcupid
    There's no need to rationalize working a strike.
    So I'll bite, why then are you spending so much time making up rationalizations in your post? Could it be you know it is undermining fellow nurses fighting for better patient care and improved working conditions?

    You do know that notice is required by federal law before a strike? This would allow time to stop admissions and go down to a census of zero. More time than a hurricane. All I did was point out that if hospitals who are impacted in a huge disaster area can cope with sudden shutdown, increase in patient load (many from nursing homes), during a decrease in staffing from staff dealing with their own emergencies at home, it is not so difficult to imagine a single hospital on strike dealing with patients without scabs.

    Of course, a hospital with nurses on strike going to a zero census would be a death knell for the hospital to remain in business. In the absence of strike workers, hospital management would thus be forced to negotiate with the union.

    "What about infection control?" Seriously? Admit to yourself you work strikes for the money (you don't volunteer for free, right?) and stop sounding silly. We will all be happy with that and actually respect your motivations.
  10. by   gcupid
    Quote from NedRN
    So I'll bite, why then are you spending so much time making up rationalizations in your post? Could it be you know it is undermining fellow nurses fighting for better patient care and improved working conditions?

    You do know that notice is required by federal law before a strike? This would allow time to stop admissions and go down to a census of zero. More time than a hurricane. All I did was point out that if hospitals who are impacted in a huge disaster area can cope with sudden shutdown, increase in patient load (many from nursing homes), during a decrease in staffing from staff dealing with their own emergencies at home, it is not so difficult to imagine a single hospital on strike dealing with patients without scabs.

    Of course, a hospital with nurses on strike going to a zero census would be a death knell for the hospital to remain in business. In the absence of strike workers, hospital management would thus be forced to negotiate with the union.

    "What about infection control?" Seriously? Admit to yourself you work strikes for the money (you don't volunteer for free, right?) and stop sounding silly. We will all be happy with that and actually respect your motivations.
    I wasnt providing justification alone. I was giving an example of critical thinking. Maybe you'd see how ignorant u sound. How many strikes that have occured in the past have only affected one hospital alone? You are the one that sounds silly. Just admit that your statements lack knowledge and sensitivity to the population it serves.

    Is there a time machine or soothsayer that can predict time sensitive emergencies that may occur? You can give notice all you want via federal law but I dont think life works that way. You can respect the fact that I have the credentials to reply back to u & critically think for myself and not repeat back foolishness of what's being told to me.
  11. by   NedRN
    So you do volunteer for strikes? Not doing it for the money?

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