Hospital cancelled my contract!?! - page 4

Okay, so I took my first assignment at John Hopkins in Baltimore and I've been there for three weeks. Well, I travel with another nurse that was contracted with me for 13 weeks on another unit. Well,... Read More

  1. by   GYPSY1349
    Quote from karengeorgebsrn
    good morning!

    as an administrative nurse dealing with budgets, and what we all know is cost-effective care for the recipients of nursing care, there is a monetary crisis in the "health care industry" today. although the nursing shortage remains "critical" there are other variables in play.

    due to an industry shortage getting professors and clinical instructors for interested "adults" who want to become nursing professionals is almost impossible. therefore, educating would be nurses is becoming more difficult to do.

    there is not one nurse; new or experienced that does not see "why one of us" would choose travel nursing, or per diem. it is clearly a financial advantage over nursing staff who are dedicated to one facility, and who make far less per hour. in fact many of us who have worked the floor in large university hospitals have seen "travel" come in and get special handling.

    i recall back in 1997 a male travel nurse come into our step/down telemetry ccu unit at my alma mater. he could not start iv's which all of us had to do up there for we practiced primary nursing. one of our nurse educators worked with him so that he could "start up" and also take simple blood draws. he told her and many of us "i just do not do that and do not want to learn."

    is anyone here smiling at this picture? after many years of hospitals getting hit due to the demand for nursing with "over budget travel expenses" they are getting sick and tired of paying these high fees out; it makes perfect sense.

    for anyone here who is licensed you have the ability to commit to one facility, dedicate to yourself and your profession by doing so, and become a viable part of a family you work with and grow with. i encourage all to see the benefit of "less is more" in this solution.

    thanks!

    karen g.
    [font="comic sans ms"]you have an interesting, though skewed perception of travel nursing...and maybe it comes from being in management, although i'm sure you haven't always been a manager.

    were it not for travel nurses, many hospitals in this country would be forced to shut down. one of the reasons so many thousands have chosen to travel, is precisely, because they were tired of the exact attitude you express in your post.

    i have been a travel nurse for over a decade, and have traveled from one end of this country to this other. prior to becoming a traveler, i worked in a hospital setting as a loyal, tried and true employee...i worked my way up to a position as director of clinical services, in charge of all licensed personnel in the facility. not only did my hospital use travelers, we treated them so well, that the same ones are still returning year after year after all this time.

    it takes a very special type of individual to make it in this field, and it goes beyond what is taught in nursing school. the saddest thing for me, after a lifetime of commitment to my profession, is that we are still in the dark ages, when it comes to supporting each other.

    your post proves this unequivocally.


  2. by   cruisernurse
    karen,

    "furthermore, you might change agencies for all of them offer vacation, bonuses, insurance, and taking the family along for the ride!"

    i'm not sure where you got your information, but you are completely wrong in assuming that all agencies provide vacation, bonuses, and insurance. that is wrong, wrong, wrong. yes, we can try to find an agency that offers these things, but they may or may not have a position in the location we want to work.

    i have been a nurse for 26 years and started traveling over a year ago and have never been happier. do i make more? not really.
    the reason i started traveling? i wanted to see the country and get paid to work at the same time.
    are travel nurses happier? many are and some are not. i can honestly say that i have been given more candy and thank you cards than ever before from happy patients. why? my attitude is so much better. i know if i don't like a place then i only have until the end of my contract to put up with a lot of crap. i also don't get involved in the politics of a unit.

    the positive for managers? not only do you have happier nurses, but your patients will tell you their experience was one of the best of any hospital stay they ever had. but the most exciting thing that managers have told me is that we come in without blinders on and have an objective opinion of why units can't keep their core staff. i am currently on my 9th assignment and every time i have been asked by the director "can you tell me the positive and negatives of my unit?" i can tell them in a split second why they can't retain staff. good managers have listened and took action. the ones not really on the same page as the staff seem to want to change, but find it easier to just stay at the status quo.

    every director i have worked for has told me they wished that agencies didn't charge so much and they could just pay the nurse direct because travelers know a whole lot more and more ways to do the same procedure (at a savings to the unit) than most of their core staff.

    hopefully, your staff is dependable and you won't need travelers, but the odds are not with you. second, hopefully you will need the care of a traveler yourself and experience great things and this will change your mind. ( not that i want you to be sick, but just see how well you can be treated).

    good luck and i really wish you could share the statistical data with the rest of us. i would really enjoy reading that material. i have a doctorate degree and love stats! i know i am weird, but math is just plain old right or wrong and no gray areas.
    cruisernurse
  3. by   candida
    " then we must end these overpaid and alienating positions."

    oh gosh karen bsn!!!! you really mean getting rid of the ceo's and the underlying facia of it's support??? that would be great! as a current "staff" nurse (although, sadly no i am not "married to my employer, i like to consider myself a "free" agent) and as a former but could -be- any -day- now travel nurse i am never overpaid!!! in fact i am not paid enough!!!. shouldn't i be paid what i am worth? as for travel nurses being unsafe - care to share an article to that effect??? back up what you say??? being a staff nurse in general can be unsafe due to high patient ratios, poor staffing, poor working conditions and mandatory overtime.

    ciao! candida
  4. by   GYPSY1349
    Quote from candida
    " then we must end these overpaid and alienating positions."

    oh gosh karen bsn!!!! you really mean getting rid of the ceo's and the underlying facia of it's support??? that would be great! as a current "staff" nurse (although, sadly no i am not "married to my employer, i like to consider myself a "free" agent) and as a former but could -be- any -day- now travel nurse i am never overpaid!!! in fact i am not paid enough!!!. shouldn't i be paid what i am worth? as for travel nurses being unsafe - care to share an article to that effect??? back up what you say??? being a staff nurse in general can be unsafe due to high patient ratios, poor staffing, poor working conditions and mandatory overtime.

    ciao! candida
    [font="comic sans ms"][color="sienna"]hey candida...come on back to the travel work any time...the water is great! hugs, jesse
  5. by   candida
    "perhaps if you took off your wings and stayed put you'd learn that you owe this to the profession."

    the wonderful think about being an american is the ablity to have a differnces of opinion; i do not agree with your statement. i have been both staff and travel nurse - both have offered me unique nursing opportunities. taking off my wings and staying put literally makes me a bird in a cage and i like freedom. i owe it to my profession to keep an open heart, an apt ear and an inquiring mind to all the opportunities that will present themselves during my nursing career. had i not "flown the coop" and started to "travel" i would never had the opportunity to work and live in germany (as well as see europe at a leisurely pace). so you may spout statistics (which by the way you haven't backed up) but i do believe you are in error.

    ~candida~

  6. by   walk6miles
    Here is my two cents (for all it's worth) regarding travel nursing. I used travel nursing to go back "home" ... over 15 years ago, I needed to leave Texas and return to Baltimore (I was supposed to marry an old flame but that turned into a nightmare - another story another time). I was able to pack the contents of my 1700 square feet home into a 700 s.f. townhome in suburban Baltimore. I wound up staying as a traveler almost three years and I remained at several assignments way past 3 sign-ups.
    I made 20.00 an hour, 600.00 a month for "rent" on the townhome. I worked every holiday and more than my share of weekends. I NEVER had control over my schedule and I did get paid a shift diff on my paycheck since I worked nights only.
    I left travel nursing when I moved (as a staff RN) to Florida. I found myself ready to jump into any assignment - I feel now, looking back, that I was a better nurse for having been a traveler - nothing bothers me; I was exposed to a variety of equipment, policies, nursing techniques and administrative attitudes. I would not trade that experience for anything.
    Perhaps a softening of the commentary on the part of administrative representation would be helpful; I know I am feeling a definite shift towards THEM versus US when I read the comments.
    Hope this helps.
  7. by   candida
    well, again from the staff versus travel issue - back in the day (oh late 80's early '90's) i worked with a nurse (staff) who was a bsn and she thought aminophylline and ampicillin were the same drug....go figure - not sure if she could start her own iv's though' - we had iv teams back then;

    ~candida~
  8. by   rncopper
    Karen,

    While you "spout" there are statistical facts, you give no references to back up your claim. And until you cite some references, your argument is invalid.

    I have been a traveler for over 7 years - the last 14 months in Saudi Arabia. In those 7 years I have grown as a nurse, learning things that could never be learned in a stiffling environment that many facilities provide for their staff. Management believes their way is the only way, the right way, and evey other way is wrong.

    You sound like a typical rhetoric speaking administrator - having no clue on what is out there and what the "real world of nursing is". I have been from AK to NH, from the US to KSA. I have learned and absorbed skills and tasks no perm nurse could even imagine because they have administrators, like yourself, who have blinders on concerning the PROFESSION of nursing. I can hit the floor running because of my varied experience. Many, if not most times, I am the most experienced nurse on the floor. I can critically think "outside the box" because I have worked "outside the box"!!

    Facilities who retain management with your narrow attitude - truly is a reason there is such a turn-over in staff. Travel nurses come into a facility to help and enable a facility to keep floors and beds open. We do it at a personal sacrifice to our families and ourselves. If we are paid a little more - it is compensation for the sacrifices we make. No vacation pay, no sick time, no education reimbursement, paying for multiple licenses, no real job security (we look for positions possibly every 13 weeks), not sleeping in our own bed. Your statement all agencies offer vacation, insurance, taking the family along is a complete fallacy. Your information source is faulty - if there is even a source. Your statement is something we travelers come up against frequently. Mgmt has told the staff what great "wages and perks" we get. And that fosters resentment towards travelers from the staff. What is sad, it is false!!

    Traveling is NOT for everyone. In fact, many long time staff nurses could never cut being a traveler because they know nothing different, things must stay the same, anything out of the routine throws them for a "loop". By your statements, it sounds like you could never cut it as a traveler - too narrow-minded.

    Your blatant disregard for a valuable part of the nursing profession - it states volumes and is a sad commentary for the management of your facility.


    Quote from KarenGeorgeBSRN
    Dear ?,

    There is a lot of hostility in what is statistical fact. It is not my right to judge what the figures show. Furthermore I am a nurse; I just happen to represent the side of nursing where executive and management take over.

    You are telling me that you did travel nursing as a speciality then? To broaden your experience and make you a better nurse? That you do not receive more money then staff nurses who commit just like a partner in marriage for the long haul?

    Travel nursing is higher paid, and more dangerous on many levels including the nonconsistency of staff; the ability to know one can "fly the coop" or break a contract. If our profession is to uphold integrity, prepare the foundation for a new generation of nursing professionals then we must END these overpaid and alienating positions.

    The nursing shortage is an epidemic get a job and stay there. You can go back to school, progress within an organization, but the costs of these positions are damaging to the acute care setting, the nurses who are committed to working as a team, and the clients and insurers.

    Furthermore, you might change agencies for all of them offer vacation, bonuses, insurance, and taking the family along for the ride!

    Thank you!

    Karen G.
  9. by   Stellaluna
    You know, Karen, I was typing my response and one thought kept crossing my mind. Since my colleagues have done such a fabulous job already, I have chose not to defend my career choice against your inaccurate statements and just post the one thought.

    If you are so anti-traveler, why are you lurking in a travelers forum.

    As a side note, maybe you could use that time and put it to good use, like actually educating yourself on the facts that accompany traveling.
  10. by   KarenGeorgeBSRN
    Dear Travelers!


    Enjoy. The truth is I linked after posting to another topic where your topic
    was posted. Found it interesting. The corporation I work for just refuses to hire
    Travel nurses due to the monopoly they think exists. Staff morale is important
    however, I do not pay the salaries, I tend who is there and does their work.
    Overall statistics show inconsistency, higher costs, and with acute hospitals ready
    to start shutting down due to costs, and sub acute LTC facilities taking up the slack
    it is evident that this type of nursing will not last very long. When I encourage nurses
    to be in one facility it also means to become responsible, a part of and to become
    leaders in positive change. It's not all about money.

    Animosity over proven fact is a known variable in poor nursing.


    Karen G.
    Last edit by KarenGeorgeBSRN on Feb 21, '08
  11. by   HarryHK
    Quote from KarenGeorgeBSRN
    Animosity over proven fact is a known variable in poor nursing.


    Karen G.
    Gee Karen, we seem to be responding to your own animosity for nurses and lack of citations for your "facts". We've cited a reputable study as well as pointing out well known demographic factors. Until you substantiate your claims, ad hominem attacks are a poor substitute for a reasoned argument. OK, a poor substitute even with evidence to support your position.
  12. by   loricatus
    Quote from karengeorgebsrn
    dear travelers!


    enjoy. the truth is i linked after posting to another topic where your topic
    was posted. found it interesting. the corporation i work for just refuses to hire
    travel nurses due to the monopoly they think exists. staff morale is important
    however, i do not pay the salaries, i tend who is there and does their work.
    overall statistics show inconsistency, higher costs, and with acute hospitals ready
    to start shutting down due to costs, and sub acute ltc facilities taking up the slack
    it is evident that this type of nursing will not last very long. when i encourage nurses
    to be in one facility it also means to become responsible, a part of and to become
    leaders in positive change. it's not all about money.

    animosity over proven fact is a known variable in poor nursing.


    karen g.
    [font="comic sans ms"]would you please provide us with proof to lend credibility to yourself and your assertions? after researching some of your many other posts on this forum, i hypothesize (utilizing the principles of the research process) hypocracy relating to your own job permanancy, a possible hidden agenda to have acute care facilities fail & deceptive advise /manipulation regarding ltc.
  13. by   jlynn325
    Karen,
    You should stick to what you know, and that clearly is not the aspects of travel nursing. Travel nursing is not a monopoly. And before you start bringing in legal facts such as that, you need to do your research. You just cant admit that we are a valuable resource. And maybe a part of you wishes you could be as valuable as we are, as outgoing as we are and skillful as we are. Maybe part of you wants to be part of a team. But the truth is, you would never survive in our world, and since you wouldnt survive, you are against it. Since you are too scare to get to know us, you shut your heart and mind to us. It would be too much of a risk for someone like you. Someone like you, who sits in an office and never has to see the nurse (thats been in your facility for years), see her spirit break because she cant take it one more day there with that patient load or those attitudes, but whose life might have been changed by a traveler. And that nurse, may have just stayed in your facility. When staff see travelers, they think "wow, my boss cares enough about me to bring in some help when there is no one to hire."
    It sad that youre so closed minded to new experiences and the true feelings of your staff. If you would listen to our stories you would find out why we first started traveling. Not always do we initial decide to travel for the experience, or because we are fed up at the job we were at, maybe because it was personal. We all have stories and a journey we are on. I feel bad that you are stuck in what we call "small town syndrome". Its not so fun being inside the box once you can be outside of it!

close