CNA

  1. I was wondering what I would have to do to become a traveling Cna, and would I have to take special courses to be able to travel around the world to care for others and if so how long would it take since I already have had hands on experience for 18 years.
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  2. 16 Comments

  3. by   loriangel14
    There are no traveling CNAs. CNA would not qualify you for a work visa in another country.
  4. by   NedRN
    I beg to differ. There certainly are travel assignments for CNAs domestically, the best bet for the original poster is to contact large agencies such as Cross Country and American Mobile.
  5. by   ICUman
    There are definitely travel CNA jobs out there. I would consider it myself if I wasn't in nursing school.
    Certain positions can pay in excess of $20+ an hour, depending on the region. It will depend on which specialities you are trained in, for like travel nursing you must be competent in your area of expertise. Hospice, hospital floors, nursing homes, and rehab are all available positions to leap into as a traveling CNA.
  6. by   loriangel14
    The OP mentioned travelling the world. That's what I was referring to.
  7. by   Ultraposh
    Im starting to notice that you cant take anyones word for anything on this site. Do your own research and just post here for advice but still be cautious of whose advice you accept! Dont miss out on a dream because one person gave you misinformation. There are a lot of know it alls here that know nothing. I hope this below is helpful. Any information needs to be checked out more in depth even this info im giving you but Im hoping its accurate and you pursue your goals! Indeed.com is a good site to read comments on traveling cnas(US agencies). If you dont find any luck going overseas then I suggest volunteering for medical missions! Good luck!

    Certified Nurse Assistant Classes for Working Overseas


    From cnaoverseas.com:

    If you enjoy providing assistance to those who suffer from various medical conditions, whether temporary or longer lasting, a position as a Certified Nursing Assistant may be a career you’d like to pursue. Many CNAs have the option to travel overseas after they’ve obtained their certification and required training. Not only can the average CNA earn a higher income, but you can also gain invaluable experience in a new culture.

    Job Description

    Certified Nursing Assistants work closely with registered nurses to help care for patients in various medical facilities all around the world. The CNA’s general responsibilities include the following:


    Helping patients perform daily tasksProviding assistance with basic grooming, feeding and other careChecking vital signs, changing bed linens, cleaning, and setting up medical equipmentProviding emotional support for patientsReporting any irregularities in the patients’ condition to the registered nurse


    Education and Training


    Whether you plan to work in the United States or overseas in one of the many countries that hire American-trained CNAs, the certification requirements are basically the same. You’ll be taking classes in anatomy and physiology, basic nursing skills, and nutrition and infections control. A typical certification program takes about 6 to 12 weeks to complete, and after that you must log at least 72 hours of hands on CNA experience.


    If you’re looking to travel overseas and work as a CNA, you’ll probably want to specialize in areas such as OR, ER, med/surg, cardiac or neonatal care. Before applying for overseas positions you’ll need to work for at least one year in the United States. You’ll also want to be sure you know nursing terminology and equipment.


    Finding CNA Classes


    There are many class options for completing your certification courses. Online and correspondence courses offer flexibility for those already working a job and looking to begin another career. Most programs will help place you into a training program where you can get your 72 hours of experience before taking the certification exam.


    If you prefer a more structured approach, you can take classes through a community college or vocational school nearby. This way you can be sure to complete your courses in a specified amount of time and in a classroom setting.


    Overseas Opportunities**************************


    Many of the opportunities offered overseas mirror those available here in the United States. You can work in a hospital or clinic setting with patients who have recently had surgery, illness or other health problems to overcome. If you prefer to work with elderly patients, your services can be used in nursing homes or for at home care for those who can no longer take care of themselves. There’s also the opportunity to work with disabled patients, providing medical help as well as emotional and social support to the patients and their families. Another aspect of home health care involves those who suffer from chronic conditions and need attention from kind, compassionate nursing personnel. These are just a few of the numerous opportunities available for the Certified Nursing Assistant.
    Last edit by Ultraposh on Jun 10, '14
  8. by   NedRN
    Well on the same note, don't believe everything you read online. Most of what you copied is hyperbole. I would say the majority of hospitals I travel to do not use CNAs at all, preferring to train their own aides. I've never seen a CNA in an OR, and none of the limited training a CNA does would be of the slightest value in an operating room. In many places, CNAs or non certified aides may only earn minimum wages and as an entry level and basically dead end job, it would be nonsensical to recruit them from high wage countries such as the US to go overseas. There is no shortage of applicants for entry level jobs.

    On the flip side, you see lots of immigrants working as aides here. That makes more sense.
  9. by   Ultraposh
    Hi yes thats why I I told her look into even what I found and I said I hope it checks out. I dont find that post alone on that site to be concrete evidence. While there are general facts for example there being cna travel assignments (within the us) many people will say there arent any and someone will take that info and never travel because they believed it. I wanted to make a point how you can find to contradicting statements online and encouraged them to do additional research and not stop at one answer. I also agree with everything you said there are so many immigrants in so many different professions over here especially Healthcare.
  10. by   Proverbs16:24
    Anyone who is a traveling CNA can share their experience?
  11. by   Glycerine82
    Quote from NedRN
    I beg to differ. There certainly are travel assignments for CNAs domestically, the best bet for the original poster is to contact large agencies such as Cross Country and American Mobile.

    Ohhh! Good to know. Something i've always assumed wasn't done.
  12. by   Glycerine82
    Quote from NedRN
    may only earn minimum wages and as an entry level and basically dead end job,
    Really? Did you have to go there? It's entry level, yes, but it's hardly dead-end. Moving up requires education, but there is much to be learned as a CNA. There are also many different avenues for a CNA to explore. LTC, home health, Rehab, Inpatient, ER being some of them.

    I can't speak for others, but even here in SC I was hired at 9.50 and was making 12 within 4 years. With shift diffs, sometimes 15. No, its not a lot, but its nearly double what minimum wage is.

    I've said it before, I'll say it again: There is nothing wrong with being a CNA. It is a job that most people could never do, and that includes a lot of nurses.

    I'm not saying that you said there was, but that's certainly the impression I got.
  13. by   NedRN
    Quote from Glycerine82
    Really? Did you have to go there? It's entry level, yes, but it's hardly dead-end. Moving up requires education, but there is much to be learned as a CNA. There are also many different avenues for a CNA to explore. LTC, home health, Rehab, Inpatient, ER being some of them.
    The same could be said of housekeeping. I think most would also consider housekeeping also to be dead end jobs with minimal mobility and minimum wage upside. I think that is why most of the readers here are either nurses or want to be.

    I can't speak for others, but even here in SC I was hired at 9.50 and was making 12 within 4 years. With shift diffs, sometimes 15. No, its not a lot, but its nearly double what minimum wage is.
    I think it bears mentioning here that minimum wage purchasing power is considerably less than it has been in the past. It was $1.60 when I got out of high school in 1973, which is about $10 an hour in 2014 dollars when corrected for inflation. If minimum wage had been inflation indexed since 1973, then fast food workers nationwide would be making a minimum entry wage of $10 and hospital aides around $12 now.

    While I don't know what the 20 year difference in CNA pay at the same hospital might be, I'm not impressed with a 25% gain in income over four years ($9.50 to $12) to just what should be fair based on historical minimum wages. Typical career gains for an RN over entry level pay is 100% without additional education or super specialty required.

    I've said it before, I'll say it again: There is nothing wrong with being a CNA. It is a job that most people could never do, and that includes a lot of nurses.

    I'm not saying that you said there was, but that's certainly the impression I got.
    I certainly don't think there is anything wrong with any job, and anyone who does their job with pride deserves respect. I will take umbrage with your belief that many nurses cannot do the job of a CNA - could you please list exactly what a CNA does that is not also in the nurse job description? My duties go all the way down to mopping floors and if my employer wants to pay my hourly for mopping floors rather than a lower paid environmental services professional, I'm happy to do it.
  14. by   Glycerine82
    [QUOTE=NedRN;8204643]

    The same could be said of housekeeping. I think most would also consider housekeeping also to be dead end jobs with minimal mobility and minimum wage upside. I think that is why most of the readers here are either nurses or want to be.
    No, the same can not be said of housekeeping. Housekeeping isn't a "field", you don't become a housekeeper to gain experience to later use that experience to help you. You don't have to pass a state exam to be a housekeeper, nor do you have to pay for classes.


    I think it bears mentioning here that minimum wage purchasing power is considerably less than it has been in the past. It was $1.60 when I got out of high school in 1973, which is about $10 an hour in 2014 dollars when corrected for inflation. If minimum wage had been inflation indexed since 1973, then fast food workers nationwide would be making a minimum entry wage of $10 and hospital aides around $12 now.

    While I don't know what the 20 year difference in CNA pay at the same hospital might be, I'm not impressed with a 25% gain in income over four years ($9.50 to $12) to just what should be fair based on historical minimum wages. Typical career gains for an RN over entry level pay is 100% without additional education or super specialty required.
    I was replying to the comment that wages as a CNA are close to minimum wage, which isn't true. Certainly it doesn't pay a lot, but it's certainly more than 7.50/hr, which is what minimum wage is. I am not comparing being a CNA to a nurse, I was replying to the comment that it is dead end, there is a big difference. This conversation was not about being an RN vs being a CNA.

    I certainly don't think there is anything wrong with any job, and anyone who does their job with pride deserves respect. I will take umbrage with your belief that many nurses cannot do the job of a CNA - could you please list exactly what a CNA does that is not also in the nurse job description? My duties go all the way down to mopping floors and if my employer wants to pay my hourly for mopping floors rather than a lower paid environmental services professional, I'm happy to do it.
    Many nurses could not do the type of work that a CNA does day in and day out. Yes, everything that a CNA does, a nurse does also, but that is not all nurses do and certainly isn't solely what they do, as you know. "CNA work", if you will, is physically, mentally and emotionally exhausting. To spend 12 hours lifting people into and out of bed, onto and off of toilets, into and out of showers, dressing, undressing, collecting specimens, changing briefs, wiping tears, re-orienting, convincing someone that their kids are safe at home, they didn't miss the train, etc. takes a huge toll on your body and mind. Many people, including nurses, wouldn't/couldn't do it.

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