UTHSC-Houston Spring 2013 - page 118

by Ladybug3 194,336 Views | 1224 Comments

Hi, I am new to allnurses.com and i wanted to start a topic for the Spring 2013 applicants at UTHSC Houston. Where we can keep each other posted on the process as it nears. I have yet to take the HESI but i wonder if anyone... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from oceanise
    I'm not sure if there's any restrictions. I'd just get the double sided. Most people seem to have either a Littmann classic II SE or classic II lightweight (both are fine depending on how much money you want to spend... I have the lightweight because it's cheaper/not as heavy). I wouldn't bother w/anything more expensive than those ones. We have to spend way too much on books/supplies/uniforms as it is.

    Hi Oceanise

    Thank you for any information you can provide.. You have been very resourceful on this board. I have been accepted to Summer 2013 BSN. I have a few questions as well. Do they give you a complete list of what books, supplies, and uniforms (for the entire program)are with total costs? If so can you give a round about figure of what the total cost is for all of these things? Can you give some insight on the scheduling how many days we have to be on campus and how many hours each day? And the same for clinicals. Also can you give insight on the workload of course work? Is it over kill or or is it manageable? Any information would be awesome appreciate you in advance. Keta
  2. 1
    Quote from ymoore1
    Hi Oceanise

    Thank you for any information you can provide.. You have been very resourceful on this board. I have been accepted to Summer 2013 BSN. I have a few questions as well. Do they give you a complete list of what books, supplies, and uniforms (for the entire program)are with total costs? If so can you give a round about figure of what the total cost is for all of these things? Can you give some insight on the scheduling how many days we have to be on campus and how many hours each day? And the same for clinicals. Also can you give insight on the workload of course work? Is it over kill or or is it manageable? Any information would be awesome appreciate you in advance. Keta
    The school doesn't actually give a complete list. The upperclassman were very helpful in telling us ahead of time what we need to buy though. For clinicals/labs - navy blue scrubs w/UThealth patches sewn on, white shoes, watch w/a second hand (not digital), stethoscope, pen light, bandage scissors, and a blood pressure cuff. The school tells you to buy a white lab coat (hip length w/UThealth patch sewn on) for clinicals, but most clinical faculty members don't actually require you to wear it (mine unfortunately does... lol). Also you have to order name tags from the bookstore but you'll have a chance to do that during orientation.

    You might want to hold off on buying books because a lot of upperclassman will be selling their copies. I don't remember exactly how much I spent on books but it was way more than I wanted to spend. The good news is that many of the books will be used for other semesters. Don't bother buying the pharm book or the Fundamentals of Nursing book for care I. I can post a list of books if you want to look up prices and get an idea of costs, just let me know.

    Since your first semester is shorter than ours, I don't know exactly what your schedule will be like. We have class 3 days a week and clinical one day (starting the 6th week into the program) but things might be different for you.

    The work is manageable if you plan your time right, study efficiently, and don't slack off. Don't let people scare you too much because most of them stress too much to begin with. But don't expect it to be easy either, you definitely have to put a lot of work into it. A lot of people don't know how to study well or have a difficult time getting used to tests in nursing school. Buy a good NCLEX book and practice these questions throughout the program (the school tells you to buy Saunders. I also like Med-Surg Success: A Course Review Applying Critical Thinking to Test Taking and NCLEX-3500 questions).
    UTHSC_Bound likes this.
  3. 0
    Quote from oceanise
    The school doesn't actually give a complete list. The upperclassman were very helpful in telling us ahead of time what we need to buy though. For clinicals/labs - navy blue scrubs w/UThealth patches sewn on, white shoes, watch w/a second hand (not digital), stethoscope, pen light, bandage scissors, and a blood pressure cuff. The school tells you to buy a white lab coat (hip length w/UThealth patch sewn on) for clinicals, but most clinical faculty members don't actually require you to wear it (mine unfortunately does... lol). Also you have to order name tags from the bookstore but you'll have a chance to do that during orientation.

    You might want to hold off on buying books because a lot of upperclassman will be selling their copies. I don't remember exactly how much I spent on books but it was way more than I wanted to spend. The good news is that many of the books will be used for other semesters. Don't bother buying the pharm book or the Fundamentals of Nursing book for care I. I can post a list of books if you want to look up prices and get an idea of costs, just let me know.

    Since your first semester is shorter than ours, I don't know exactly what your schedule will be like. We have class 3 days a week and clinical one day (starting the 6th week into the program) but things might be different for you.

    The work is manageable if you plan your time right, study efficiently, and don't slack off. Don't let people scare you too much because most of them stress too much to begin with. But don't expect it to be easy either, you definitely have to put a lot of work into it. A lot of people don't know how to study well or have a difficult time getting used to tests in nursing school. Buy a good NCLEX book and practice these questions throughout the program (the school tells you to buy Saunders. I also like Med-Surg Success: A Course Review Applying Critical Thinking to Test Taking and NCLEX-3500 questions).
    Thanks Oceanise for all the great info!! I've been accepted to the Summer Program as well!! If you don't mind, can you post the list of books and prices you were talking about!

    Thanks again!!
  4. 2
    Quote from Kimbers2882
    Thanks Oceanise for all the great info!! I've been accepted to the Summer Program as well!! If you don't mind, can you post the list of books and prices you were talking about!

    Thanks again!!
    Sure! Buy as many of these used as you can, except the NCLEX books. Many of the upperclassman will be selling their textbooks.


    Health Assessment:
    Physical Examination and Health Assessment 6th edition by Jarvis
    Student Laboratory Manual for Physical Examination & Health Assessment 6th edition by Jarvis (Definitely hold off on buying this until after the first day of classes because some lab instructors won't require you to use it. If yours does, go ahead and buy it, otherwise save the $25 or so.)
    The school also includes the Jarvis pocket guide in the required books. Definately don't bother buying this.


    Pharm:
    Pharmacology for Nursing Care, 7th edition by Lehne (Do NOT buy this, you def won't need it. The prof is very good with his powerpoint slides and all the test questions are based on the slides.)


    Patho:
    Pathophysiology: The Biologic Basis for Disease in Adults and Children, 6th edition by McCance
    100 Case Studies in Pathophysiology by Bruyere (make sure your copy comes w/the CD because that's supposedly where the test questions come from)


    Care I:
    Brunner & Suddarth's Textbook of Medical-Surgical Nursing 12th edition (This comes in 2 volumes and that's how the bookstore sells it as. Try to find the combined volume if you can because it's somewhat cheaper. It's huge, but it's not like you'll be carrying your books to class anyway. I bought the combo version used off of amazon).
    Fundamentals of Nursing, 8th edition by Potter & Perry (I kind of regret buying this one because I've barely used it and just read Brunner & Suddarth. Whether or not you buy this one is up to you)
    Saunders Comprehensive Review for the NCLEX-RN Exam 5th edition (make sure yours comes w/the CD for practice questions!)
    HESI Comprehensive Review for the NCLEX-RN Examination, 3rd edition (I haven't used this one yet but maybe later on in the program it will be useful?)
    Nursing Diagnosis Handbook: An Evidence-Based Guide to Planning Care, 9th editon by Ackley (great book for the careplans you'll be doing for your clinicals)
    Mosby's Manual of Diagnostic and Laboratory Tests, 4th edition
    A nursing drug handbook is also good to have. I don't remember which one the school tells you to buy, but just get whichever one you want.
    Wishbig and UTHSC_Bound like this.
  5. 0
    You are awesome, thank you!
  6. 0
    Quote from oceanise

    Sure! Buy as many of these used as you can, except the NCLEX books. Many of the upperclassman will be selling their textbooks.

    Health Assessment:
    Physical Examination and Health Assessment 6th edition by Jarvis
    Student Laboratory Manual for Physical Examination & Health Assessment 6th edition by Jarvis (Definitely hold off on buying this until after the first day of classes because some lab instructors won't require you to use it. If yours does, go ahead and buy it, otherwise save the $25 or so.)
    The school also includes the Jarvis pocket guide in the required books. Definately don't bother buying this.

    Pharm:
    Pharmacology for Nursing Care, 7th edition by Lehne (Do NOT buy this, you def won't need it. The prof is very good with his powerpoint slides and all the test questions are based on the slides.)

    Patho:
    Pathophysiology: The Biologic Basis for Disease in Adults and Children, 6th edition by McCance
    100 Case Studies in Pathophysiology by Bruyere (make sure your copy comes w/the CD because that's supposedly where the test questions come from)

    Care I:
    Brunner & Suddarth's Textbook of Medical-Surgical Nursing 12th edition (This comes in 2 volumes and that's how the bookstore sells it as. Try to find the combined volume if you can because it's somewhat cheaper. It's huge, but it's not like you'll be carrying your books to class anyway. I bought the combo version used off of amazon).
    Fundamentals of Nursing, 8th edition by Potter & Perry (I kind of regret buying this one because I've barely used it and just read Brunner & Suddarth. Whether or not you buy this one is up to you)
    Saunders Comprehensive Review for the NCLEX-RN Exam 5th edition (make sure yours comes w/the CD for practice questions!)
    HESI Comprehensive Review for the NCLEX-RN Examination, 3rd edition (I haven't used this one yet but maybe later on in the program it will be useful?)
    Nursing Diagnosis Handbook: An Evidence-Based Guide to Planning Care, 9th editon by Ackley (great book for the careplans you'll be doing for your clinicals)
    Mosby's Manual of Diagnostic and Laboratory Tests, 4th edition
    A nursing drug handbook is also good to have. I don't remember which one the school tells you to buy, but just get whichever one you want.
    Awesome!!! Thanks so much for the info!!
  7. 0
    Quote from oceanise
    Sure! Buy as many of these used as you can, except the NCLEX books. Many of the upperclassman will be selling their textbooks.


    Health Assessment:
    Physical Examination and Health Assessment 6th edition by Jarvis
    Student Laboratory Manual for Physical Examination & Health Assessment 6th edition by Jarvis (Definitely hold off on buying this until after the first day of classes because some lab instructors won't require you to use it. If yours does, go ahead and buy it, otherwise save the $25 or so.)
    The school also includes the Jarvis pocket guide in the required books. Definately don't bother buying this.


    Pharm:
    Pharmacology for Nursing Care, 7th edition by Lehne (Do NOT buy this, you def won't need it. The prof is very good with his powerpoint slides and all the test questions are based on the slides.)


    Patho:
    Pathophysiology: The Biologic Basis for Disease in Adults and Children, 6th edition by McCance
    100 Case Studies in Pathophysiology by Bruyere (make sure your copy comes w/the CD because that's supposedly where the test questions come from)


    Care I:
    Brunner & Suddarth's Textbook of Medical-Surgical Nursing 12th edition (This comes in 2 volumes and that's how the bookstore sells it as. Try to find the combined volume if you can because it's somewhat cheaper. It's huge, but it's not like you'll be carrying your books to class anyway. I bought the combo version used off of amazon).
    Fundamentals of Nursing, 8th edition by Potter & Perry (I kind of regret buying this one because I've barely used it and just read Brunner & Suddarth. Whether or not you buy this one is up to you)
    Saunders Comprehensive Review for the NCLEX-RN Exam 5th edition (make sure yours comes w/the CD for practice questions!)
    HESI Comprehensive Review for the NCLEX-RN Examination, 3rd edition (I haven't used this one yet but maybe later on in the program it will be useful?)
    Nursing Diagnosis Handbook: An Evidence-Based Guide to Planning Care, 9th editon by Ackley (great book for the careplans you'll be doing for your clinicals)
    Mosby's Manual of Diagnostic and Laboratory Tests, 4th edition
    A nursing drug handbook is also good to have. I don't remember which one the school tells you to buy, but just get whichever one you want.

    Thanks for all the info you are awesome. Are there somethings or areas you can recommend to us newbies to maybe start studying for now (high-level) before the start of program? Kinda to get a head start on everything. I also was reading thru the Program Policies and came across the [COLOR=#000000]Management of Metric Conversions, Intake and Output, Dosages and Solutions Policy. It states students will be required to pass with 100% accuracy Dosage and Solutions for Health Assessment I course. I have taken Pharmacology / Calculation class before so I am familiar but it its not necessarily a strong area for me. Can you recommend some areas I can start concentrating on to study for this now?

    Also I have read several years back in postings for past UT students and most do say most of the people that dropped out did not find a good way to study material. Do you have any insight you can provide on that maybe ways you have found helpful in your studying?

    Thanks again. I really [/COLOR]
    [COLOR=#000000]appreciate all your info.[/COLOR]
  8. 1
    The dosage calculatons test is really easy. Seriously, don't stress out over it or bother studying for it now. It's just really basic conversions, like mL to ounces, oz to pints, or lbs to kg. Or if you have an order for 750mg of a drug and there's 250mg in a tablet, how many tablets do you give? Simple stuff like that. Most people passed it on the first try and even if you don't for whatever reason, you have up to 3 chances to get 100%.


    Don't stress out over reading ahead of time either. The only thing I recommend you do once you get a copy of the Saunders' NCLEX book - write a 3 page summary (can be double spaced) on chapter 5. Get it out of the way before classes start. This will give you 5 extra points on your first care I test.


    For studying... well, the profs all record their lectures so that you can watch them online, and I think a lot of people rely too much on this. I like to prepare a little bit ahead of time (like skim the chapter in the book or the powerpoint slides) and just try to get the most out of the lecture as I can, rather than going back and rewatching it later. Don't get me wrong, it's a great resource to have, but I only like to go back and rewatch lectures if there's a certain thing I missed or didn't understand at the time. Rather than watch a 3hr lecture all over again, I'd rather make better use of my time. I like to make outlines of the slides/reading/etc. just so that I can organize things into something that's easier for me to study and that flows better/whatever and to have everything in one place. You might have to experiment a bit to figure out what works best for you. Also, focus only on what the prof goes over in class and what's on the powerpoint slides. The patho book for example goes into a lot more depth than you need to know. Be organized, use your time efficiently, and don't fall behind/keep up with the work and readings, and you should be fine.
    UTHSC_Bound likes this.
  9. 0
    Quote from oceanise
    The dosage calculatons test is really easy. Seriously, don't stress out over it or bother studying for it now. It's just really basic conversions, like mL to ounces, oz to pints, or lbs to kg. Or if you have an order for 750mg of a drug and there's 250mg in a tablet, how many tablets do you give? Simple stuff like that. Most people passed it on the first try and even if you don't for whatever reason, you have up to 3 chances to get 100%.


    Don't stress out over reading ahead of time either. The only thing I recommend you do once you get a copy of the Saunders' NCLEX book - write a 3 page summary (can be double spaced) on chapter 5. Get it out of the way before classes start. This will give you 5 extra points on your first care I test.


    For studying... well, the profs all record their lectures so that you can watch them online, and I think a lot of people rely too much on this. I like to prepare a little bit ahead of time (like skim the chapter in the book or the powerpoint slides) and just try to get the most out of the lecture as I can, rather than going back and rewatching it later. Don't get me wrong, it's a great resource to have, but I only like to go back and rewatch lectures if there's a certain thing I missed or didn't understand at the time. Rather than watch a 3hr lecture all over again, I'd rather make better use of my time. I like to make outlines of the slides/reading/etc. just so that I can organize things into something that's easier for me to study and that flows better/whatever and to have everything in one place. You might have to experiment a bit to figure out what works best for you. Also, focus only on what the prof goes over in class and what's on the powerpoint slides. The patho book for example goes into a lot more depth than you need to know. Be organized, use your time efficiently, and don't fall behind/keep up with the work and readings, and you should be fine.

    Thanks a million this really helps!
  10. 0
    Quote from oceanise
    The dosage calculatons test is really easy. Seriously, don't stress out over it or bother studying for it now. It's just really basic conversions, like mL to ounces, oz to pints, or lbs to kg. Or if you have an order for 750mg of a drug and there's 250mg in a tablet, how many tablets do you give? Simple stuff like that. Most people passed it on the first try and even if you don't for whatever reason, you have up to 3 chances to get 100%.


    Don't stress out over reading ahead of time either. The only thing I recommend you do once you get a copy of the Saunders' NCLEX book - write a 3 page summary (can be double spaced) on chapter 5. Get it out of the way before classes start. This will give you 5 extra points on your first care I test.


    For studying... well, the profs all record their lectures so that you can watch them online, and I think a lot of people rely too much on this. I like to prepare a little bit ahead of time (like skim the chapter in the book or the powerpoint slides) and just try to get the most out of the lecture as I can, rather than going back and rewatching it later. Don't get me wrong, it's a great resource to have, but I only like to go back and rewatch lectures if there's a certain thing I missed or didn't understand at the time. Rather than watch a 3hr lecture all over again, I'd rather make better use of my time. I like to make outlines of the slides/reading/etc. just so that I can organize things into something that's easier for me to study and that flows better/whatever and to have everything in one place. You might have to experiment a bit to figure out what works best for you. Also, focus only on what the prof goes over in class and what's on the powerpoint slides. The patho book for example goes into a lot more depth than you need to know. Be organized, use your time efficiently, and don't fall behind/keep up with the work and readings, and you should be fine.
    Thanks again for all the great info!! Very helpful!


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