thanks for all the hints/still need help

  1. thanks guys for the hints i guess i'm not yet use to this that is why i am still bbein g sloppy about my question. i have a mathematical background(B.Sc) l live in houston texas. what level of nursing program would you suggest i start from and i really do not understand the difference btw all these progs.
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  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   jvu1982
    Quote from newonboard
    thanks guys for the hints i guess i'm not yet use to this that is why i am still bbein g sloppy about my question. i have a mathematical background(B.Sc) l live in houston texas. what level of nursing program would you suggest i start from and i really do not understand the difference btw all these progs.
    well considering you have a degree. you could get your ADN license, but if you want to also consider a management position later on, it's better to get your BSN degree
  4. by   purplemania
    Associates degree is a shorter program than BSN, but both will make you eligible to take the NCLEX test for licensure. I chose BSN because, like you, I already had lots of college credit and was not too far from getting BSN. BSN degrees are more often required for any management position. UT Austin has a bridge program for people with non-nursing degrees to get their RN in 15 months (I think.) Check out their website, and other schools in your area. You need to talk to an advisor. People are often confused about the multiple entry levels available to nursing. Everyone takes the same type test, regardless of which degree program they were graduated from. Nursing school is just part of the criteria for being allowed to take the test for licensure. Hope this helps.
  5. by   mrigas
    I have a B.A. in advertising and didn't think that I had much of a chance with all of the competition these days. I applied to the generic BSN programs at both UT Health Science & UTMB and got in to both. Both were the same in length (5 sem.), but I accepted UTHSC because they have a baccalaureate plus program that allows you to get some of your basic grad classes out of the way during your last semester.
    Another option, if you can't get in as soon as you want to the major universities is to apply for an ADN program at a community college. This is a good option b/c it allows you to do a RN to BSN transition program while you are working (so most likely your employer will pay for it) and also you get to start your "1 year of experience" requirement for your master's. Good lick!

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