Texas Nursing Laws/Policy

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    I was wondering if anyone knows the Tx Board of Nursing Rules Regarding reporting medication errors? I recently made a med error and it has to go t/the peer review board at the hospital that I work at (per policy). This error happened at the beginning of March and its now May and so far I am still waiting around basically. This will go to the Peer Review and then they will decide whether or not to report it to the BNE. So does anyone know if they have a certain amount of time that they have to report this? I have looked on the BNE but was unable to find any info. Any info will help! Thanks
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    Sadly, there is no time limit on reporting things to the BNE. Recently when my hospital wanted to get rid of an outspoken RN they went through all of her documentation, MARS and Pixys records dating back to her hire date...They reported mistakes to the BNE that were over two years old. Everything they could possibly dig up was sent to the BNE.

    Admin here will probably ask you to call the BNE or an attorney because discussion of legal problems isn't allowed on allnurses. Good luck.
    lyceeboo likes this.
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    Quote from Crazy4kids
    Admin here will probably ask you to call the BNE or an attorney because discussion of legal problems isn't allowed on allnurses. Good luck.
    Thread has been moved to the Texas Nurses forum for further discussion.

    You are correct, though. No legal advice is to be exchanged, per TOS (terms of service).
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    Sadly, there is no time limit on reporting things to the BNE. Recently when my hospital wanted to get rid of an outspoken RN they went through all of her documentation, MARS and Pixys records dating back to her hire date...They reported mistakes to the BNE that were over two years old. Everything they could possibly dig up was sent to the BNE.
    This is scary and makes me wonder if I am making a mistake by going into nursing.
    Are the majority of med errors reported to the BNE, or does it depend on what type of error it is? Is this something that the hospitals do, or is initiated by the patient and families? As a nursing student, this is something that I worry about a lot. I just don't see how a human being can be in nursing for many years and not make some kind of mistake. What happens to nurses if they make a med error and it is reported to the BNE? What happens to nurses who make honest mistakes? Are their careers over?
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    Quote from Heloisea3
    Are the majority of med errors reported to the BNE, or does it depend on what type of error it is?
    Unfortunately, it sometimes depends on who you are.

    Nursing is permeated with workplace politics. The nurse who is popular and well-liked by coworkers and management can frequently get away with med errors, while the unpopular nurse who is not in the workplace clique has a higher likelihood of getting reported for every little petty wrongdoing.

    Life isn't fair. Work isn't fair.
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    Most places I've been adhere to the rule of waiting for 3 errors before reporting to the BNE unless it falls under a particular category of carelessness or danger to pts. Then one error can get you reported.

    As the years go by, I have seen this used more often as a tool to get rid of nurses that facilities did not like, usually the ones vocal about staffing/safety issues. And yet they never seem to report the nurses that make a med error weekly but the nurses never challenge management.

    It really is a crap shoot these days whether or not you will be reported. You have to decide for yourself if you want to take the risk and be a nurse.

    To the OP - you should have a copy of your facility's P&P on the peer review process. If you cannot find it in your manual on your unit, ask for it. You have the right to know the procedures. Plus, I'd want to know the procedure so I could make sure that they followed their own rules.

    One reason it is taking so long is that some places only meet quarterly to discuss the matter. Then they still have to pick and choose the nurses that they will use as your peers. Then they have to meet and review things. This can take forever.

    I would start preparing a statement about your error. Why it happened. What you learned. What steps you are taking to prevent it from happening again. This always looks good on your part if you are prepared with something like this. You might also take a CNE course on preventing med errors as a token of taking this seriously. It could forestall any "punishment" that they might give you. Offering to do a poster inservice for the unit about preventing med errors would also look great on your part.

    Hang in there. I know that the waiting is the worst.
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    Thanks everyone for your responses! I do know nurses on my unit that have made worse errors and have not been reported AT ALL! I reported my own error though, i filled out the pmeninic (sp) on myself. I could not see lying about it, i did it and i owned up to it my mistake and that is one thing that is helping me to keep my head held high. I have searched policy's at my hospital and found nothing. Other nurses that are supporting me (pretty much the whole night shift on my unit) are trying to search for the policy too. They have even sent letters to managemnt saying how unfair they are being and how things are being handled very unprofessionaly (thats another topic !!) So thanks to everyone again!


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