So I cannot find a job, thinking about relocating to Texas - page 2

by lampost20 8,513 Views | 26 Comments

Been a RN for two Years, and recently and stupidly made a move to Nevada the unemployment capital of the US at a strong 19 % (including the 5 % that have given up or not eligible for unemployment) So I am thinking of relocating... Read More


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    I moved from the Midwest to TX, and lived there from 1985-2002 (nearly 2003). In the rural areas, they have jobs. Look into the towns within 60-100 miles of a larger town, so day trips are easily done. The cost of living was WAY lower than here (back in MW, came to help with demented mom- she died, I got sick, now am stuck at least for the midrange future). The salaries sound bad on paper, but once the cost of living is figured in, it was a higher quality of life there.

    I've packed to go back 3 times in 8 1/2 years- it was good enough to go back to - just haven't been able to. Maybe figure out a way to visit? I love Austin and the Hill Country...my heart is home there
    nola1202 likes this.
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    This is courtesy of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The general unemployment rate of an area should give you a good idea of the outlook on healthcare jobs since unemployment in non-healthcare fields directly affects employment for HCW's.

    http://www.bls.gov/web/laus/mstrtcr1.gif
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    I think you would easily find a job in south texas (san antonio or further south).
    xtxrn likes this.
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    It all depends on what part of the state you are talking about. There's about 600 hospitals and over a thousand LTC's here. I keep hearing about openings in the Temple/Belton/Killeen area. The advice about smaller towns with smaller hospitals is good. Get out a map and try to find the smaller cities under 50,000 population. Sherman and Denison come to mind. And don't turn up your nose at the towns that have hospitals with only 25 or 30 beds. They may not have the best pay and benefits but they are good places spend a year or so and get some refrences built up.
    xtxrn likes this.
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    Quote from belgarion
    It all depends on what part of the state you are talking about. There's about 600 hospitals and over a thousand LTC's here. I keep hearing about openings in the Temple/Belton/Killeen area. The advice about smaller towns with smaller hospitals is good. Get out a map and try to find the smaller cities under 50,000 population. Sherman and Denison come to mind. And don't turn up your nose at the towns that have hospitals with only 25 or 30 beds. They may not have the best pay and benefits but they are good places spend a year or so and get some refrences built up.


    And ime, they are more invested in the person as well as the "product" you bring...I worked in Kerrville- and loved it. Fredricksburg is also nice, and has a newer hospital from what I've heard (Kerrville does too). They're both roughly 100 miles SW of Austin or 65 miles NW of San Antonio... WONDERFUL part of TX....very pretty
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    I'm a new RN grad in Texas and neither have I, nor 90% of those I graduated with, landed nursing jobs. It's going on 6 months now. I'm not sure where everyone is getting the info that jobs are plentiful in Texas, they're really not. It's been a HUGE struggle just to land an interview. I graduated with honors and have been in the medical field for years. We have tons of nursing schools churning out new grads and I'm really sorry to say this but it depresses me even more to read everyone packing up and wanting to move here. Lived here all my life and I can't find a nursing job.
    all4ofus likes this.
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    Quote from Bonnie86
    I'm a new RN grad in Texas and neither have I, nor 90% of those I graduated with, landed nursing jobs. It's going on 6 months now. I'm not sure where everyone is getting the info that jobs are plentiful in Texas, they're really not. It's been a HUGE struggle just to land an interview. I graduated with honors and have been in the medical field for years. We have tons of nursing schools churning out new grads and I'm really sorry to say this but it depresses me even more to read everyone packing up and wanting to move here. Lived here all my life and I can't find a nursing job.
    I'm not sure where you're at, but maybe you need to move further south for a while?
  8. 0
    Quote from nursemichelle80
    The Pensacola area.
    I LOVE Pensacola! I used to live 8 hours from you and vacationed there as often possible. The sugar white beaches are to die for! I'd jump at this job opportunity in a heartbeat if the planets aligned for me
  9. 0
    Quote from Bonnie86
    I'm a new RN grad in Texas and neither have I, nor 90% of those I graduated with, landed nursing jobs. It's going on 6 months now. I'm not sure where everyone is getting the info that jobs are plentiful in Texas, they're really not. It's been a HUGE struggle just to land an interview. I graduated with honors and have been in the medical field for years. We have tons of nursing schools churning out new grads and I'm really sorry to say this but it depresses me even more to read everyone packing up and wanting to move here. Lived here all my life and I can't find a nursing job.
    From my understanding the larger cities are naturally more saturated with new grads....but smaller towns have more openings, and are more likely to give someone a chance as a new grad. When I lived in Kerrville, they were getting nurses from agencies all the time to have enough RNs (from 1991-2002). The folks I'm in contact with are having no problems finding jobs in smaller towns It can't hurt to call local employers, and ask
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    An RN with two years of experience is not going to have the same difficulties or be competing with the new grad for jobs. Jobs here (in Texas) are definitely not plentiful no matter how you look at it. I wish the rumor of there being a huge number of nursing jobs in Texas would die down.

    That being said, if you are willing to look along the Texas/Mexico border (definitely rare to get snow there) or in the more remote places you most likely will find a warm reception as an experienced nurse and sometimes even as a new graduate. The suburbs are a little bit friendlier to experienced nurses than to new grads. A new grad can forget finding a position in the major cities right now, but having two years of experience is different.

    I do heartily, strongly, persuasively recommend you have a firm job offer with a start date and salary info before you move ANYWHERE - Texas or otherwise.
    SandraCVRN likes this.


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