Possibly relocating from NJ to Texas! - page 3

by JetBlitz | 3,125 Views | 23 Comments

hello all! i believe this is the first time i've written a topic so i'll be brief. i have been unemployed for the past 7 months and have been aggressively looking for jobs even before i resigned from my previous employment... Read More


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    No, I have a California license, so when I was offered the positions in Dallas, I was told that I could not start until I had at least a temporary Texas license. Once I made my decision and accepted one of the positions, I got on that right away! The Texas BON seems to be pretty on top of things in my case - I am already in their system and things seem to be progressing. But no, I didn't attempt to get a Texas license until I had an offer in hand.
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    By "desperate" I am referencing some hospitals here close to the border that I have heard terrible things about and over the years here several people have spoken about how they quit shortly after taking the jobs because of the conditions. Seems like they were in Brownsville or McAllen? Somewhere like that.

    If you can find a job at a good hospital though North Texas is a wonderful place to live. I have been here just over 8 years now and love it. You will have AC for the heat so it is all good.
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    Quote from JetBlitz
    . . .Does anyone else have any experiences with 'desperate' hospitals? I've never heard of such a term and any insight on their methodology in recruitment and their treatment of those from out of state would help me prepare my material for the interview.
    Desperate hospitals recruit nurses from out of state because they cannot or do not attract local nurses. You have to think about a hospital's reasons for wanting to hire from out of the area when many nurses in the state of Texas are unemployed and would like to work.

    It would seem more cost-effective to interview, hire, and train nurses who live in the same metro area where the hospital is located. Why would a hospital pay good money for an out-of-state applicant's travel expenses when they could simply bypass these costs by hiring a local nurse? Behind every action is a reason...
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    Quote from TheCommuter
    Desperate hospitals recruit nurses from out of state because they cannot or do not attract local nurses. You have to think about a hospital's reasons for wanting to hire from out of the area when many nurses in the state of Texas are unemployed and would like to work.

    It would seem more cost-effective to interview, hire, and train nurses who live in the same metro area where the hospital is located. Why would a hospital pay good money for an out-of-state applicant's travel expenses when they could simply bypass these costs by hiring a local nurse? Behind every action is a reason...
    I agree. In my case, I wasn't "recruited" by either of the hospitals I received offers from. I decided that Dallas might be a good place to live, so I applied online. I found that telephone and Skype interviews are the norm, and that some hospitals would rather hire without meeting a candidate in person than pay the money to fly them out to interview them. In my case, I did not feel comfortable accepting a position to work at a place I had never seen to work with people I had never met, so I flew out at my own expense to check the place out. I'm not sure if this is the "standard" for applying for out of state jobs, but this is what I did. I definitely agree that if hospitals seem like they are trying to intentionally recruit out of state nurses, this would be a red flag.


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