Parkland - page 2

Does anyone know anything about Parkland's NICU?... Read More

  1. by   txspadequeenRN
    Okie dokie then.....thanks for the corretion


    Quote from RN-BSN2B
    A Nurse Clinician(I-III) at UTMB Galveston means a registered nurse with a ASN or BSN degree not an advanced practice nurse.

    Titles usually change per institution.
  2. by   sunnyjohn
    Quote from txspadequeen921
    I noticed that Parkland has several levels for RN's. How do you get to levels II and III.

    Experience, years on the job, additional certs, empoyer performance evaluations, etc..... Climbing the ladder, just like with any job.

    I *heart* Parkland!
  3. by   Finallyat40
    Yeah, what Sunnyjohn said....the differences between RN I, RN II and RN III, is typically based on years of experience, activities within your unit (i.e., are you active on unit committees, do you participate in performance improvement projects, do you attend continuing education events to expand your knowledge base, yada, yada, yada?) A nurse with and ADN can difinitely ascend to the RN II position, however, I don't know about the RN III positions. I think that Nurse Clinicians are going to be closer to the nurse practitioner type position....probably a physician extender, maybe in the clinical setting.

    As for the question of what a nursing student extern would do in a NICU environment, we use our PCT's in the Acute Care and Continuing Care Nurseries (these are our feeder/growers as they are getting better and preparing for home). Our PCT's help us with vital signs, feedings (gavage, bottle and g-tube), bathing, holding and comforting our babies....they also help us keep our supplies stocked, discharge babies to home, etc. They are so necessary and at least in my opinion VERY appreciated! It's great experience, especially for someone who is seriously considering NNICU as it allows you to become more comfortable with the wee ones and the complicated cases, so that when you start the RN residency program after graduation, you are much more prepared for what lies ahead.

    It is my opinion that a NNICU nurse is called, not made....there have been many nurses come through who get close to completing the residency program and then decide it's not for them....that's ok...everyone has a love and it's a matter of finding that for you.

    My husband works for a local private hospital and keeps trying to get me to consider a job there and I tell him no way....I love the challenge, I love being busy, and most of all, I love my co-workers...and that's what counts!

    Jamie
  4. by   foxyhill21
    This sounds like such a cool program, I grad nxt yr and Im thinking abt this program. It is nice to hear feedback from pple that went through the program? How many pt do the nurses take care of in a shift?(NICU) Is it hard to get an internship at parkland?
  5. by   Junebug7700
    I'm new here, but am actually starting the NICU residency in January. My group had 40 applicants (before they stopped accepting applications) and they only had 10 spots open. However, I think if you are right for the position you will get it and if you aren't then you will get another job where you fit.

    You can ask me any questions about the interview/ application process. Also, I will keep you posted as I go through the program.
  6. by   lifeLONGstudent
    Someone said that this program is not for everyone... that is correct. There is no shame in realizing that. It would be sad for anyone to do the residency and then be in a 2 year contract for a job they didn't like.


    You can drop out for free up to 1/2 way through the residency. You will have had 6-9 shifts on your unit by then, so you should have a pretty good feel of your unit (staff relations) and what is expected. Personally, I cannot say anything but great stuff about my unit & the staff on my unit, but I realize that is not the case everywhere.


    I am in the residency for ER, MICU, BICU, CPICU, and SICU -- we don't have NNICU or LD with us... I think you guys have your own residency. Our class started with about 35 people. Now, we are at 28 (or close to it). Some decided that it was not what they were looking for. Some had problems with NCLEX or trouble scheduling NCLEX because their out of state school didn't send records in time (you must test and pass NCLEX by a certain deadline at Parkland). I think that some realized that the program was too intense for them, but realize that these people didn't get much time in school with critical patients on vents, etc.... and that makes it hard, because Parkland will teach you everything you wanted to know about vents and then some.... plus you are EXPECTED to know it when you are on the floor! They will teach it to you, but you have to make an effort also, and if you didn't get vent lectures or vented patients in school (yes, some schools just kind of skim over this stuff).... it is really hard to catch up.

    I guess I am saying that you CAN do the program, but if you get in and realize it is not for you, that is ok too --- don't feel bad. You have to do what you think is best for you... .and only you know what that is. Don't try to make it happen if it isn't working out for ya.

    lifeLONGstudent
  7. by   sunnyjohn
    Quote from lifeLONGstudent
    Someone said that this program is not for everyone... that is correct. There is no shame in realizing that. It would be sad for anyone to do the residency and then be in a 2 year contract for a job they didn't like.


    You can drop out for free up to 1/2 way through the residency. You will have had 6-9 shifts on your unit by then, so you should have a pretty good feel of your unit (staff relations) and what is expected. Personally, I cannot say anything but great stuff about my unit & the staff on my unit, but I realize that is not the case everywhere.


    I am in the residency for ER, MICU, BICU, CPICU, and SICU -- we don't have NNICU or LD with us... I think you guys have your own residency. Our class started with about 35 people. Now, we are at 28 (or close to it). Some decided that it was not what they were looking for. Some had problems with NCLEX or trouble scheduling NCLEX because their out of state school didn't send records in time (you must test and pass NCLEX by a certain deadline at Parkland). I think that some realized that the program was too intense for them, but realize that these people didn't get much time in school with critical patients on vents, etc.... and that makes it hard, because Parkland will teach you everything you wanted to know about vents and then some.... plus you are EXPECTED to know it when you are on the floor! They will teach it to you, but you have to make an effort also, and if you didn't get vent lectures or vented patients in school (yes, some schools just kind of skim over this stuff).... it is really hard to catch up.

    I guess I am saying that you CAN do the program, but if you get in and realize it is not for you, that is ok too --- don't feel bad. You have to do what you think is best for you... .and only you know what that is. Don't try to make it happen if it isn't working out for ya.

    lifeLONGstudent
    This is the one I want to do: http://www.parklandcareers.com/conte...c=cricarandtra

    I was sent a brochure and detailed write up on the program and it is just what I am looking for!
  8. by   foxyhill21
    Are the graduate credits going toward a certain degree eg. like a NP degree?

    Quote from sunnyjohn
    I would love to try for the Parkland Critical care residency program, (the long one that gives you graduate credit and rotates you through all the ICU sub-sections.

    Could you imagine getting trained in Neuro, Burn and all the adult ICU's before settling down to your home dept???
  9. by   a_clay
    I would assume that the credits would apply to any graduate level nursing degree.
    Quote from foxyhill21
    Are the graduate credits going toward a certain degree eg. like a NP degree?

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