Tennessee RN Requirements

  1. 0
    Hello everyone! My aunt is planning a move to Tennessee from Ohio and I am trying to find out the requirements for an RN in Tennessee. She was wondering how she could go about transferring and if the requirements are the same. I would love some help! Thank you so much!

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  2. 13 Comments...

  3. 0
    All 50 states practice reciprocity; that is, if you are licensed as an RN in one state you can automatically get a license in another state (assuming you have a clean criminal and disciplinary record ...) Your aunt just needs to contact the TN Board of Nursing and request an application. There will be a fee for the license (of course! :chuckle ), which is determined by each state board and varies widely from state to state. The amount of time it takes to issue the license also varies greatly. Many states issue you a temporary permit right away which enables you to start working while they finish the background checks and issue the real license.
  4. 0
    Quote from elkpark
    All 50 states practice reciprocity; that is, if you are licensed as an RN in one state you can automatically get a license in another state (assuming you have a clean criminal and disciplinary record ...) Your aunt just needs to contact the TN Board of Nursing and request an application. There will be a fee for the license (of course! :chuckle ), which is determined by each state board and varies widely from state to state. The amount of time it takes to issue the license also varies greatly. Many states issue you a temporary permit right away which enables you to start working while they finish the background checks and issue the real license.

    All states do not practice reciprocity. There is an something called the "Nurse Licensure Compact". States that are members are Arizona, Arkansas, Delaware, Idaho, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Mexico, N.Dakota, S.Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Wisconsin. Those that are pending are IN, NJ, VA.
    For info go to: http://www.ncsbn.org/nlc/rnlpvncompact.asp
  5. 0
    Quote from soon2bsmith
    Hello everyone! My aunt is planning a move to Tennessee from Ohio and I am trying to find out the requirements for an RN in Tennessee. She was wondering how she could go about transferring and if the requirements are the same. I would love some help! Thank you so much!
    If your aunt is an RN, she should be able to figure this out. I don't mean to sound rude, but she shold know this.
  6. 0
    Quote from BETSRN
    If your aunt is an RN, she should be able to figure this out. I don't mean to sound rude, but she shold know this.

    The number for the TN Board of Nursing is (615) 532-3202. I wish you the best of luck. klsteele

    I hope I posted on the right space. My post is not the first one. klsteele
    Last edit by klsteele on Feb 14, '05
  7. 0
    All states do not practice reciprocity. There is an something called the "Nurse Licensure Compact". States that are members are Arizona, Arkansas, Delaware, Idaho, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Mexico, N.Dakota, S.Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Wisconsin. Those that are pending are IN, NJ, VA.
    For info go to: http://www.ncsbn.org/nlc/rnlpvncompact.asp
    All states do practice reciprocity, and the Nurse Licensure Compact is entirely separate from that. The NLC is a program in which nurses licensed in a Compact state can practice in another Compact state without getting a separate, additional license from the other state. You are still only licensed in your original state. It is a relatively new program and, as you note, does not include all states (although it does include more states than you listed).

    Any of the 50 states will issue you a license yo practice nursing in that state if you have a current license in good standing in another state and a clean disciplinary record, and pay whatever fee they require (this is what is usually meant by the term "reciprocity" in nursing).


    (
    If your aunt is an RN, she should be able to figure this out. I don't mean to sound rude, but she shold know this.
    ITA, and yet, if you do a search on this site, you will find that people keep asking this same question over, and over, and over, and over, and ....)
  8. 0
    Quote from elkpark
    All states do practice reciprocity, and the Nurse Licensure Compact is entirely separate from that. The NLC is a program in which nurses licensed in a Compact state can practice in another Compact state without getting a separate, additional license from the other state. You are still only licensed in your original state. It is a relatively new program and, as you note, does not include all states (although it does include more states than you listed).

    Any of the 50 states will issue you a license yo practice nursing in that state if you have a current license in good standing in another state and a clean disciplinary record, and pay whatever fee they require (this is what is usually meant by the term "reciprocity" in nursing).


    (
    ITA, and yet, if you do a search on this site, you will find that people keep asking this same question over, and over, and over, and over, and ....)
    That's not true. Ask any traveling nurse.
    As a former travel nurse, depending on the state, there is a LOT more to gaining licensure in another state than having an RN license in one state, paying the fee, and having a clean criminal background.
    If that were true, there would never have been a nurse licensure compact. It was designed to cut the red tape of "your RN program doesn't meet the state requirements of our RN program."
    Last edit by RN34TX on Feb 15, '05
  9. 0
    That's not true. Ask any traveling nurse.
    As a former travel nurse, depending on the state, there is a LOT more to gaining licensure in another state than having an RN license in one state, paying the fee, and having a clean criminal background.
    If that were true, there would never have been a nurse licensure compact. It was designed to cut the red tape of "your RN program doesn't meet the state requirements of our RN program."
    Then I have been misinformed and I apologize. I have not worked as a traveling nurse, but I have lived in a few different states over the years, and each time the process of getting the new license was as I described; no additional requirements. I guess I was just lucky in my choice of states!
  10. 0
    Quote from elkpark
    Then I have been misinformed and I apologize. I have not worked as a traveling nurse, but I have lived in a few different states over the years, and each time the process of getting the new license was as I described; no additional requirements. I guess I was just lucky in my choice of states!
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but it used to be that certain states required a BSN (out west I think????). I didn't worry too much about it as I have a BSN but at any rate, it may not be that way anymore & I have no clue if that matters if you are already an RN & want to work in one of those places as far as reciprocity.
  11. 0
    Quote from elkpark
    All states do practice reciprocity, and the Nurse Licensure Compact is entirely separate from that. The NLC is a program in which nurses licensed in a Compact state can practice in another Compact state without getting a separate, additional license from the other state. You are still only licensed in your original state. It is a relatively new program and, as you note, does not include all states (although it does include more states than you listed).

    Any of the 50 states will issue you a license yo practice nursing in that state if you have a current license in good standing in another state and a clean disciplinary record, and pay whatever fee they require (this is what is usually meant by the term "reciprocity" in nursing).


    (
    ITA, and yet, if you do a search on this site, you will find that people keep asking this same question over, and over, and over, and over, and ....)
    Several states require CEU's before you can be licensed in their state. NY comes to mind. Many are requiring fingerprints, some require a birth certificate, some verify every license you carry some only verify your "home" state.. Some require you to have a job in that state before they will issue you a license..

    So it's not that easy to figure out exactly what a state wants.

    Some have their forms on their websites some don't.

    That's why the compact was instituted. Among other reasons.

    6 years is hardly "relatively new"


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