Lnp to RN

  1. 0
    I am about to start LPN at Tenn Tech in May and I am extemely excited. I have about 36 college credits but I havent been to school in ages. I am now starting over at 45. EEEK I am hoping that I will get my license and my goal is to then continue on to receive my RN. I am trying to do research now but it seems a bit confusing to me. It seems the fast track is still the same amount of credits and time needed? 65 and 2 years??? Does receiving your LNP make it easier to get into an RN course and are some schools easier than others? I am in the Jackson TN area.
    for your thoughts!

    Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  2. 7 Comments...

  3. 1
    First of all Congrats! My mother-in-law just graduated from Jackson's LPN to RN program. It was hard for her, she had to repeat a class or two but she is happy to have her RN license (just got it a like a month or two ago) and is working at Jackson Madison County General.

    I am currently in the BSN program at UTM almost finished with my junior year of the program which means I have one more to go.

    I don't have experience with your direct situation but basically an LPN program is 1 year and a straight ADSN program is 2 years. The benefit of getting your LPN first is you are able to work after just 1 year so you can make money and also they get more clinical experience.

    Getting your LPN first wouldn't make it easier to get into an RN course if you are going to bridge in the LPN-RN class as everyone else trying to get in has the same qualifications as you. If you are wanting to get your LPN and then start a ADSN or BSN program then you might have a leg up. We currently have 1 girl in my BSN class who already is an LPN and she is doing well.
    Last edit by Gauge on Mar 23, '09
    pupsnpaws likes this.
  4. 1
    There are people who go into an LPN to RN bridge program to avoid competing with everyone in the traditional program. One can sometimes save lots of time and possible disappointment. No lotteries, no rejections, no waitlists. The specific situation would be different with each program.
    pupsnpaws likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from caliotter3
    There are people who go into an LPN to RN bridge program to avoid competing with everyone in the traditional program. One can sometimes save lots of time and possible disappointment. No lotteries, no rejections, no waitlists. The specific situation would be different with each program.

    Not sure what program you are referring to? That sounds too easy, and I would be weary of that type of school. I am an LPN and had to do the exact same thing as the rest of the applicants. I even had to take an NCLEX style test to even be considered. I am going up against many others for about 10 spots or less. So...competive? yes...rejections..yes...waitlist...yes...lotteries ...what is that? The advantages are that I will go 3 semesters instead of 4 and I have experience. I have already gone to school for one year for LPN, but I still will have to maintain to stay in the program, so the stresses are the same for us as well
  6. 2
    Quote from caliotter3
    There are people who go into an LPN to RN bridge program to avoid competing with everyone in the traditional program. One can sometimes save lots of time and possible disappointment. No lotteries, no rejections, no waitlists. The specific situation would be different with each program.
    True,

    As an LPN-RN bridge applicant, you are NOT competing against the same group of people that are starting the program fresh. If approx half of the initial batch flunk out, there should be many openings for the LPN to slide in and take the place of the class dropout.

    ETSU in Johnson City told me that as a "bridger" I don't have to compete against the new program starters. Also, several other schools guarantee you a spot.

    Good luck all, I need to start my RN bridge pre-req and get going on my RN, sooner rather than later.
    jacquisosa and pupsnpaws like this.
  7. 0
    The same at Walter State. Because I am an LPN, I am able to be "bumped" so to speak because I have more experience. I have to complete two semesters and I am an RN. I am still required to meet the same requirements as an entry level nurse but they slip me into a separate group away from the traditional students. That is why a lot around here do this. So they can work to pay for RN and get in easier. I don't believe this makes the school any less. I tell employers where I am going and they are please with my choice in school.
  8. 0
    In the LPN-ADN program at Motlow, you have to have taken certain prerequisites (English, Psychology, Biology, A&P, etc.) and then you have to take a class in the summer that is all of the credits from the first year of the regular ADN program, consolidated into one class. After taking all of those, you only have one year left. But, it is true that if you look at the catalog, both the regular ADN program and the LPN-ADN program are 66 credit hours.
  9. 0
    Thank you so much and good luck to you!


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top