Transition from bedside to call center/triage? - page 2

Hello again. I posted last year, as I am an experienced med/surg RN who applied to a call center job because I am wanting to try nursing outside of the hospital setting. I didn't get an invitation to... Read More

  1. Visit  VanessaRn89 profile page
    0
    Hello!


    Interesting I saw this post- I might have some insight as I work in a call center as a nurse. My job is a bit different - I do not triage per say. I work for a vendor, so nurses are hired to serve as licensed healthcare communicators for various pharmaceutical companies. Let's say you have a question regarding a specific medication- maybe side effect or stability information, you can call the pharmaceutical company and typically may get a nurse or other healthcare professional on the line to answer your questions and if you report that these side effects occurred to a patient then they are required by the FDA to make a post marketing adverse event report..... It's unfortunate that more information regarding this jobs are not out there- it is very different and only certain individuals actually stay. I am not sure how other companies work. The hours are not set in stone meaning even if you are scheduled to log out at 5 pm- sometimes it may not happen, you may get a call at 4:59 pm or may still be working on an adverse event report you received earlier ( if that's part of your job). Some days we don't receive that may calls, there may be a lot of sitting around not doing much- but again depends on what your role is and the call value, I know certain client ( pharmaceutical company) may receive one call after the other nonstop.


    At my job, there are certain things you have to say throughout the call because it is a requirement ( ex. a specific greeting) you are recorded and your calls are listened and "graded" based on how you handled it and if you hit all your "marks." Some nurses find it a bit overwhelming to sit all day and take calls after call, remember everything they are suppose to do during the call, other just miss the patient interaction and using their technical skills. In this job, you use the computer at all times- especially specific programs and you navigate it while still talking on the phone ( multitasking to the max) with time you start to get it. Knowing where to transfer patients to or the information you have available to answer questions is a must- most of the clients I work for have a set of FAQs you can use and you are not allowed to give any other information then what is provided ( can be tough if you know the info or what you would do or say in a clinical setting)


    At my current job we do work after hours, weekends and holidays- for a few of the pharmaceutical companies the nurses provide support and teaching as well ( injection training, answering general medication and disease questions): this I really enjoy. For other projects, I provide MRI information to HCPs and report AEs ( adverse events) and product quality complaints (PQC or PC- anything wrong with the actual med and its packaging physically), which again may differ from what you are req to do. FYI the pay not the greatest ( well at my job lol )


    I know this is a lot of info so, anything specific ask away!
  2. Visit  Maxtang profile page
    0
    VanessaRn89; are you still employed in a call center? I just had an interview for a similar job to yours in a call center today. I'm an OR nurse of 28 years & looking to make a change. It seems like very interesting work for someone who may eventually want a career change to pharmaceutical research or clinical trials, like myself. If you are still employed at such, can you tell me if it is still enjoyable or has it gotten tedious? I'm very curious about the position & if offered employment for the right salary and benefits will probably accept. Thanks!
  3. Visit  VanessaRn89 profile page
    0
    Quote from Maxtang
    VanessaRn89; are you still employed in a call center? I just had an interview for a similar job to yours in a call center today. I'm an OR nurse of 28 years & looking to make a change. It seems like very interesting work for someone who may eventually want a career change to pharmaceutical research or clinical trials, like myself. If you are still employed at such, can you tell me if it is still enjoyable or has it gotten tedious? I'm very curious about the position & if offered employment for the right salary and benefits will probably accept. Thanks!
    I am still there, as with any job there are so positives and negative aspects. I think it depends where you work. If you are interested in the clinical trials or research then starting in an actual pharmaceutical company will be best, I work for a vendor hired by the pharm. company. I am looking into working directly for a pharma. company if I decide to stay in this field of nursing. I know some nurses that have primarily worked in this field.
  4. Visit  callctrspvr profile page
    2
    I am a Nurse Manager of a triage call center with 20 nurses and a clerk. Triage is definately considered a skill, as it requires training and autonomy . It is not for everyone because it requires nurses to think quickly without support staff around them . Our call volume is such that we do 200 calls per day on weekends and 100 per evening /night during the week. They do not sit and wait for the phone to ring, it is constant.
    Our biggest challange is those who want a jobn to work from home while they reaise their kids. ALthough it looks ideal, we cannot allow our nurses to be caretakers for anyone while working. They should treat their job as if they were working from an office. It should be secluded, quiet, door for patient privacy ( no kids or dogs heard) .

    I encourage yuou to keep the certifications you have . One hsould always be at the highest level of nursing you can be. My nurses are certified pediatric nurses and cpr certified. Also we do not hire new nurses, All nurses must have a minimum of 3 years pediatric experience and be stong clinical nurses who can critically think and pass a med test.

    Good luck to you
    MatrixRn and Rntr like this.
  5. Visit  tyra_nursetye profile page
    0
    I worked non-clinical call center for almost two years. They both involved nursing assessment skill. Everything else was administration and customer service. It was what I call "a break from clinical" nursing. It was fun for me because I like to talk and type. So I excelled at becoming an adverse event nurse for the programs I worked on. You will have to "want to do it" because it can become stressful: call monitoring, remember scriptings and wordings, scheduled breaks, strict schedule adherence, etc. It was cool though; remember I only did it for a little less than 2 years *wink*


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