Working full-time throughout nursing school

  1. 13
    It's possible. I am living proof. I worked full-time as a LVN during my RN bridge program. It wasn't easy. My advice for people who have to work is to get a job as a tech. The experience helps in nursing school. The hardest part was the lack of social life. I feel like I haven't seen my friends and family for a year. Glad I'm done with this.

    It's possible.

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  3. 9 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    Congratulations!!
    virgo,student nurse likes this.
  5. 1
    Yes grats!!! What were your grades like?
    virgo,student nurse likes this.
  6. 1
    I am in a similar boat. I work full time Thr,Fri,sat, 12 hr nights. Just took my final for the first semester and was the only overall A in the class. there were other that didn’t work at all and just got C’s. It is all about how you apply yourself. Mind you I had no life besides work and school but in three more semesters it will hopefully all pay off.

    I have been saving up my pto so this next semester I plan to only work two days a week when there is an exam. Plus working full time at my hospital as a tech qualifies me for four grand a year in tuition reimbursement which more than pays for my CC expenses. There is also no obligation to work any amount of time for the money after graduation.
    virgo,student nurse likes this.
  7. 1
    Quote from newway
    I am in a similar boat. I work full time Thr,Fri,sat, 12 hr nights. Just took my final for the first semester and was the only overall A in the class. there were other that didnít work at all and just got Cís. It is all about how you apply yourself. Mind you I had no life besides work and school but in three more semesters it will hopefully all pay off.

    I have been saving up my pto so this next semester I plan to only work two days a week when there is an exam. Plus working full time at my hospital as a tech qualifies me for four grand a year in tuition reimbursement which more than pays for my CC expenses. There is also no obligation to work any amount of time for the money after graduation.
    Please excuse my ignorance as I am just now doing prereqs for nursing school. I am also in the midst of a NA II class. What do you mean by "working as a tech?" My plan has been to get on at the local hospital as a NA II and work barely part time while I do nursing school which I wouldn't start until fall 2012. I am also thinking of taking a phlebotomy course this spring. Which would be better to work as? NA II or phlebotomist?
    virgo,student nurse likes this.
  8. 2
    Congrats! It can be done, I am also working full-time as a LPN while going to school for RN. I am "lucky" because my classes are online so at least that part works around my schedule. I am also a mother and wife which is a blessing and a curse in this situation. Love my family and my husband is very supportive but my daughter is only 4 and I sometimes feel like she gets the short end. I do try to take off of work the day before an exam so that I can rest and study but that doesn't always happen. 5 more months and I am done!Good luck to anyone considering RN school that knows you will have to work full-time. It is very hard at times but it is going to pay off!
  9. 1
    Quote from Klimpys
    Please excuse my ignorance as I am just now doing prereqs for nursing school. I am also in the midst of a NA II class. What do you mean by "working as a tech?" My plan has been to get on at the local hospital as a NA II and work barely part time while I do nursing school which I wouldn't start until fall 2012. I am also thinking of taking a phlebotomy course this spring. Which would be better to work as? NA II or phlebotomist?
    Personally I definitely think working as a nursing assistant would be much better experience than as a phlebotomist. Sure, as a phlebotomist you will have super needle-sticking skills as a new nurse, but you will not have the overall "nursing" experience that being a nursing assistant would give you. Also, where I worked as a nursing assistant during nursing school, we did the blood draws on our pts, so I got that experience too.
    virgo,student nurse likes this.
  10. 0
    Quote from ProgressiveThinking
    It's possible. I am living proof. I worked full-time as a LVN during my RN bridge program. It wasn't easy. My advice for people who have to work is to get a job as a tech. The experience helps in nursing school. The hardest part was the lack of social life. I feel like I haven't seen my friends and family for a year. Glad I'm done with this.

    It's possible.


    Congratulations! Though I'm just starting the application process for nursing school (Fall 2012), I'm planning on working full-time as a tech while going through school. Thank you for this post.
  11. 0
    Quote from Klimpys
    Please excuse my ignorance as I am just now doing prereqs for nursing school. I am also in the midst of a NA II class. What do you mean by "working as a tech?" My plan has been to get on at the local hospital as a NA II and work barely part time while I do nursing school which I wouldn't start until fall 2012. I am also thinking of taking a phlebotomy course this spring. Which would be better to work as? NA II or phlebotomist?
    I am a patient care technician. It is basically a CNA with a little extra in hospital training to do things like EKGís DC (discontinue) Foleys and IVís. in the ER you may also be asked to things like irrigate small wounds casting and put stirrey strips on something superficial. It is most likely the same thing as your hospital calls a nursing assistant II. I think the NA II job would be more beneficial IMO.


    I Honestly think I learned more working as a tech than I did in clinicals. In clinical you are assigned a nurse who may or may not like teaching, and who may or may not trust you. At work you can seek out the nurses who like to teach. I remember asking one nurse about a chest tube once. She spent the next fifteen minutes explaining the in and out of it to me. I never got anything close to that in clinical.


    We unfortunately had a very poor theory instructor. Our class was her first class she ever taught theory to, and we kind of paid the price. In additions to being a tech I did have another advantage and that is that my wife is an RN working on her NP. So I had a live in tutor I could ask questions to at any time.
    Working is not for everyone. I had a classmate that was working three 8 hour shifts a week and had to cut back to just two because she was failing. If you do get a job try to get in the flex department. It is a little harder because you never get the same patients, and have to get to know all the differences of each department, but you will also get the broadest view. If you do get a tech job you will also be comfortable working with patients in clinical, and know most of the terminology such as C&S, UA, Bipap, due to void and such.


    My biggest advice is stay out of the drama and negativity, and if you are not getting what you need from your instructor seek other sources. For me I left theory at first break the whole second half of the semester because she just read from the book and I could do that at home. So instead I had the book in one hand and my laptop in the other and anything that wasnít clear to me I just goggled. Sources like pubmed and mayo clinic puts things in very understandable terms. It is always good to hear things from a second source, and that is what a good instructor will do but it just wasnít there in my case.


    Best of luck
  12. 1
    I did this also but I did it for LPN and RN. 3 full years, and I had good grades.
    Nurse2b7337 likes this.


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