If you are a hispanic nurse or you know someone who is a hispanic nurse...

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    can you please tell me your or her success story, how did you overcome your obstacles(I'm not talking about financial aid) did you get respected working as a nurse?
    lovegreen27 likes this.
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    my best friend is.. she hasnt had any problems or discrimination??? We're in SW Arkansas though...
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    What a bizarre question. I guess I'm just culturally ignorant, but I've never heard of hispanic nurses as a group being treated with less respect than nurses of any other ethnicity. I've worked with many hispanic nurses and have never had an issue with them based on their race.

    What leads you to believe that hispanic nurses are less respected?
    cebollita, Sterren, JohnnysGirl, and 1 other like this.
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    I used to work at a facility where one of the residents always referred to me as "the little Mexican nurse". She was a Mennonite lady of indeterminate old age with more than a little dementia, but her name for me wasn't meant disrespectfully---she used it to distinguish me from the other nurses, whom she either didn't care for or simply didn't know well.

    Maybe it's because we are in a middle-upper income category, but I've never felt particularly discriminated against. In fact, the only times I've ever felt that way were when my husband and I would get stopped for what we called DWH (Driving While Hispanic). It used to happen in California fairly often because we are both dark-haired and brown-skinned (at least in summer) and we drove a low-slung Oldsmobile. The Border Patrol just loved pulling us over and making us open the car trunk. Good times. Sheesh.
    peruanita and SuesquatchRN like this.
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    Quote from VivaLasViejas
    In fact, the only times I've ever felt that way were when my husband and I would get stopped for what we called DWH (Driving While Hispanic).
    You have a great sense of humor about a not-funny problem.

    However, I cannot believe we still have such prejudice among our police officers.
    newRNstudent02 likes this.
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    I have two very good nurse friends who are Hispanic - one is from Puerto Rico, the other Mexican-American. My Puerto Rican friend is lighter skinned and does not get much in the way of questioning about anything. My Mexican-American friend speaks perfect Spanish (of course) but also speaks English with a very southern accent. Of course she gets questions all the time about how she learned English. "Uh, I was born & raised right here in this county...."

    She has encountered some racial issues and has been told to "go back home, wetback" which is of course hurtful. What she has told me is that she can't change other people's minds but she can be the best person possible and show them kindness no matter what. Most of the time, however, she has no problems at all.

    I consider both of these women very good friends and am glad I count them in my circle. I worked with both of them for a number of years and they are exceptional nurses as well.
    rninformatics, lola80, and BBFRN like this.
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    Never had any problems, but I am pretty light skinned and really don't 'look' hispanic. In fact, I've had the opposite problem: Other hispanics not taking me seriously because I don't 'look' hispanic. When I was in college I wanted to join a Latina club (WAYY back in the 80's) and they all looked at me like I had three heads. But, I have to say, if I had darker skin, I might have run into problems because I used to live in places (Inland Pacific Northwest) where people are pretty prejudiced.
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    I have had the reverse happen to me I was refused work becaue i was not spanish figure that i understand differrent languages so i look at it there loss too bad.
    Sterren likes this.
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    Quote from Dolce
    You have a great sense of humor about a not-funny problem.

    However, I cannot believe we still have such prejudice among our police officers.
    You just haven't lived long enough. :wink2:

    I guess it depends on where you live. Brief history of Hispanic peoples:

    Spain conquered the native peoples south of the border and in California and the desert southwest of what is now the US. Along with other Europeans, they essentially enslaved the native populace. Study the history of the Missions in California to get a little flavor of what life was like under European rule of the natives. Study topics like La Raza, the zoot suit wars, migrant farm/agricultural workers, "wetbacks" (a really hateful term), and you will get an idea of where the animosity originated and where things stand today.

    A lot of native Hispanic Americans do not speak English, believe it or not, as there is either no need to use it within their barrios (ghettoes) or they do not want to learn it, due to contempt for English-speaking imperialists who stole their land not so very long ago. Their ancestors were here first and they just have had a hard way to go under European rule. Understandable. How would you feel if your homeland was overrun and you and your loved ones and neighbors were forced to adopt a new language, a new religion, and new ways? Even several generations later, the desire to know and live their heritage is very, very strong.

    Look up the Hispanic Nurses' Association and the Chicano issue/movement.

    Some Spanish-speaking nurses tell me that they are very often called to translate. They don't mind except that it takes them away from their own work and takes up a lot of time. That's why some places have instituted a bilingual bonus.
    hijadecalifas likes this.
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    Quote from molly16
    can you please tell me your or her success story, how did you overcome your obstacles(I'm not talking about financial aid) did you get respected working as a nurse?
    I know an Hispanic nurse who went through school while working full time and raising 5 children!

    She has never mentioned racial trouble while in school but has called upon the Hispanic Nurses' Association a couple of times for help in dealing with trouble on the job. Warranted or not, that is, whether the troubles were due to race, I do not know. She's still employed so I guess the HNA helped.

    Why do you ask?


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