If you are a hispanic nurse or you know someone who is a hispanic nurse... - page 4

by molly16 23,265 Views | 55 Comments

can you please tell me your or her success story, how did you overcome your obstacles(I'm not talking about financial aid) did you get respected working as a nurse?:bluecry1::sniff:... Read More


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    Quote from Covet
    I am an hispanic nurse. I came from PUERTO RICO knowing no English. People make fun of my accent but they don't have what i have........... Determination and courage to make it everyday. Now am an L.P.N. working for the federal Goverment and still going to school to pursue a master in Nursing.. To all the hispanic nurses dont ever , ever give up on your dreams.
    I would consider you a brother or sister, depending on whether you are a man or a woman
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    my charge nurse is from honduras and i think she gets a lot of respect. i know i respect her. patients, especially older patients, are more likely to comment on your heritage or skin color than younger ones. i am white, but live in a city that has a very good mixed population of various cultures. white people are not the majority here and there are plenty of times patients and coworkers alike will make fun of my 'whiteness'. either because they think i am literally to white or because i'm rhythmically challenged or about the probability that my family enslaved their's hundreds of years ago. i don't mind it as long as the person joking can take me joking back with them. it's not fair if an african american or latino can pick on me because of my color/ethnicity but i can't say something back in a joking manner without them taking it as me being racist.
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    Twenty years ago or so, I worked with a nurse who came from Mexico as an adult, but attended nursing school in the US. She was treated so shamefully in the clinic associated with our hospital when she was there as a patient that she left us to take a job in a clinic that treats some of our hispanic population. We nurses really missed her and were infuriated with the people in the cliic who couldn't see past her rather pronounced Spanish accent.
    D_lohvRN likes this.
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    I'm very white (although I have a chunk of Native American in me!) and I must say, I have a deep appreciation for the Mexican culture. In Texas, I had the opportunity to take care of Mexican patients all the time. It was delightful for me, even though my Spanish is extremely limited. We had no Mexican nurses, though: at least where I lived, there was a definite barrier for them.

    I knew one black nurse at that hospital, and she was one of the best nurses I've ever known. When she was working in the ER one night, the trauma doc ordered her out of the room because (quote) "I won't work with n*****s".

    I had one nursing instructor who was blatantly racist. A good friend of mine, who was white, was married to a Mexican man. Our instructor did everything she could to boot my friend out of the program. This instructor also forced her own daughter to switch to another university because "there were Jews there".

    Elderly patients are especially prone to be racist. I've seen patients demand to have different nurses or doctors because they refused to be cared for by non-whites. But that generation is dying away, and much of their ignorance is dying with them.

    I think it's shameful when anyone of any ethnicity is degraded. When my children were little, my husband and I deliberately chose to live in a neighborhood that had a wild mix of different colors and cultures because we wanted our kids to learn tolerance. I'm very happy to say that my kids are thoroughly color-blind. They not only have friends of all colors, but they do not hesitate to step up and protest when they see a person being put down.

    My mom was a racist: it was how she was taught and she never questioned it. She adored my boyfriend, who was her home health nurse during her terminal illness. Imagine her surprise when I eventually told her my boyfriend, whom she regarded as the most perfect man on earth, is Puerto Rican. (He's light skinned, so she didn't suspect it.)

    One day, these mindless prejudices will melt away. The sooner the better. I think we all have a duty to teach our children that skin color is irrelevant, cultural differences are to be embraced, and to practice what we preach.
    USNurse1, D_lohvRN, StarryEyed, RN, and 2 others like this.
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    Quote from DonaldJ
    What a bizarre question. I guess I'm just culturally ignorant, but I've never heard of hispanic nurses as a group being treated with less respect than nurses of any other ethnicity. I've worked with many hispanic nurses and have never had an issue with them based on their race.

    What leads you to believe that hispanic nurses are less respected?
    I'm assuming it depends on where you work and the overall environment for Hispanics in your state, geographic region etc. I am a Hispanic nurse and in my state Hispanic nurses are just as DISRESPECTED as all the others!
    Zookeeper3 likes this.
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    Quote from Jamesdotter
    Twenty years ago or so, I worked with a nurse who came from Mexico as an adult, but attended nursing school in the US. She was treated so shamefully in the clinic associated with our hospital when she was there as a patient that she left us to take a job in a clinic that treats some of our hispanic population. We nurses really missed her and were infuriated with the people in the cliic who couldn't see past her rather pronounced Spanish accent.
    Thank you for that James. I see many folks posting here thinking that this is a non-issue. Only folks that have never experienced any type of racism themselves could question the validity of this question.
  7. 0
    i had to do a project my last semester in school where i interviewed someone from another culture about their thoughts on healthcare. the person i interviewed was a hispanic policeman. i learned so much through the very elaborate interview/conversation with him. one thing he said was that he didn't respect nurses from other cultures. he prefered to have a hispanic nurse proividing his care while hospitalized. so, i think it goes both ways, unfortuntaley. (he also said his culture considered blue eyed people the devil because in the story of adam and eve, the snake had blue eyes. these were his words, not mine) there is so much to learn regarding culture and healthcare. it's sad to hear nurses are treating others nurses differently just because of their race. we're supposed to be a team!
  8. 1
    Quote from nc29mom
    i had to do a project my last semester in school where i interviewed someone from another culture about their thoughts on healthcare. the person i interviewed was a hispanic policeman. i learned so much through the very elaborate interview/conversation with him. one thing he said was that he didn't respect nurses from other cultures. he prefered to have a hispanic nurse proividing his care while hospitalized. so, i think it goes both ways, unfortuntaley. (he also said his culture considered blue eyed people the devil because in the story of adam and eve, the snake had blue eyes. these were his words, not mine) there is so much to learn regarding culture and healthcare. it's sad to hear nurses are treating others nurses differently just because of their race. we're supposed to be a team!
    this is true, i think it can go both ways. an interesting thing is that i believe it all stems from ignorance. i am hispanic by ethnicity but there is no such thing in my specific origin that even resembles your patient's comments regarding blue-eyed people. the reason for that is that hispanics have a common language but the culture is quite variable between countries of origin, we are multi-racial (just like the united states). some of us are white (and have blonds, redheads and blue-eyed people in our families), some are black, some are actually native americans (indigenous central & south americans)...and many are actually a combination of two or three races. yet, in the u.s. hispanics are seen as this monolith...which is completely incorrect. racism is experienced when people cannot see beyound the stereotypes to get to know real person, when you are a minority in numbers...it can become a pretty lonely existence.
    cebollita likes this.
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    i am mexican american and i have never had any issues.in fact, i wouldnt even want anyone bringing up the fact that im mexican in the same sentence of congratulating me on my career success (if that makes any sense lol). what im trying to say is that i am equal to the person next to me regardless of my or their nationality. i wouldn't say im a successful mexican, but rather a successful person.i do think its a shame if someone is mistreated because of their nationality. we have physicians at my hospital that are from other countries and its hard to understand them.there can be language barriers and its ignorant to disrespect someone because of their accent.for me i am a person, a human, not a race. i do embrace my culture, but its not measured in my success.
  10. 0
    That's my problem too...I don't look Hispanic at all...and I too get looked at strangely when I have joined Hispanic associations/causes in the past!


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