If you are a hispanic nurse or you know someone who is a hispanic nurse... - page 2

can you please tell me your or her success story, how did you overcome your obstacles(I'm not talking about financial aid) did you get respected working as a nurse?:bluecry1::sniff:... Read More

  1. Visit  IngyRN} profile page
    0
    I just moved th the greater Cincinnati area from the northeast. I have never felt so out of place. I know there is a Hispanic community here, but in the hospital and in my neighborhood I feel like people look and speak down to me ( as if they have never seen "my kind"), they are rude and short. So much for that midwest warm welcome. And they say northeasterners are rude! I have never felt this kind this feeling-I can assure you I DO NOT like it-good thing I am only in OH for 1 year. It makes me so sad and angry at the same time. I am not sure how to handle this in a professional and assertive without getting upset.
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  3. Visit  Dolce} profile page
    0
    Quote from molly16
    I'm asking because I'm a hispanic nursing student and where I live white people are very racist. they really need to know that not all hispanic people are illegal immigrants , that if a person is hispanic that doesn't mean a person is not smart. by the way I asked this question because I wanted to know if hispanic nurses get respected in their jobs . I'm an international student I'm living in this state for about less than 1 year so what hurts me the most is the people of my same country who are rude and make fun of my english accent. for example if you dont have a perfect english pronunciation they always talk to you in spanish but they do it with an bad attitude and very rude. I don't know but I'm trying to change my mind and drop out of my nursing program and do something else.
    I'm sorry you are having such a difficult time. Racism is inexcusable and unacceptable. There is no reason for you to be treated in such a way.

    I have the deepest respect for my Hispanic coworkers and they are considered an asset where I work because most of them can translate for our Spanish speaking patients. I love telling patients who speak only Spanish that we have a Spanish-speaking nurse for them. It instantly puts the patients at ease when they have someone caring for them who speaks their language. My department that I am working in now does not have any Spanish-speaking nurses and so we have to use the translators or translation line for patients. I would love to have a nurse in our department who was bilingual. Many hospitals will pay bilingual nurses more per hour if they agree to translate.

    Please don't let the haters get you down. Ignore their ignorant comments--they don't know what they are talking about.
  4. Visit  molly16} profile page
    0
    Quote from IngyRN
    I just moved th the greater Cincinnati area from the northeast. I have never felt so out of place. I know there is a Hispanic community here, but in the hospital and in my neighborhood I feel like people look and speak down to me ( as if they have never seen "my kind"), they are rude and short. So much for that midwest warm welcome. And they say northeasterners are rude! I have never felt this kind this feeling-I can assure you I DO NOT like it-good thing I am only in OH for 1 year. It makes me so sad and angry at the same time. I am not sure how to handle this in a professional and assertive without getting upset.
    people are never going to understand that hispanic people are not worms we are human being. I really don't know what to do if I should drop out of the nursing program because I really like nursing, I'm a really nice person that love helping other people and care about them, I'm taking this career not for the money because I really don't need it. but I don't want to work with ****** females or feel out of place.
  5. Visit  molly16} profile page
    0
    Quote from Dolce
    I'm sorry you are having such a difficult time. Racism is inexcusable and unacceptable. There is no reason for you to be treated in such a way.

    I have the deepest respect for my Hispanic coworkers and they are considered an asset where I work because most of them can translate for our Spanish speaking patients. I love telling patients who speak only Spanish that we have a Spanish-speaking nurse for them. It instantly puts the patients at ease when they have someone caring for them who speaks their language. My department that I am working in now does not have any Spanish-speaking nurses and so we have to use the translators or translation line for patients. I would love to have a nurse in our department who was bilingual. Many hospitals will pay bilingual nurses more per hour if they agree to translate.

    Please don't let the haters get you down. Ignore their ignorant comments--they don't know what they are talking about.
    Thanks for the advice! I'm glad that you made your dream come true and became a nurse.
  6. Visit  mimilinda77} profile page
    1
    I am colombian and very light skinned. It's always hilarious to me when patients (and fellow staff-nurses, aides, and MD's) seemed so shocked when I speak to them in Spanish. "I thought you were white" has been said to me on more than one occasion. "You speak Spanish and English so well." is another. My favorite was when I told someone I was from Colombia and they asked, "What part of Mexico is that?". When I responded that it wasn't a part of Mexico, they looked baffled and asked, "Then where is it?" trying my hardest to not be a smartie pants I said to them in my sweetest voice, "It's one of the other 20 countries in the world that use Spanish as its native language." Geez, funny how we all gravitate towards stereotypes (I don't exclude myself in this observation)!
    Anyway, at my particular hospital in Southern California being hispanic facilitates communication with my patients, and while not making me fully culturally competent (this takes, in my opinion, years of advanced studies in sociology!) much more culturally aware. I would say that about 45% of my hospital staff is either hispanic, asian, or middle eastern. And it rocks! And as hurtful as experiencing someone elses prejudice may be, try and teach others about your culture. I never miss an opportunity to speak of the beauty of Colombia, and I always give my coworkers Colombian coffee! I try not to feel hurt with negative or derogatory comments about hispanics (or any other culture). I have family in Kansas City, Mo. (Colombian as well), and midwesterners do tend to be standoffish at first, but eventually they see where your coming from...and now they beg for my uncles and cousins to invite them over for ajiaco and arepa colombiana (traditional foods).
    Suerte (good luck)!
    SuesquatchRN likes this.
  7. Visit  Vito Andolini} profile page
    0
    Quote from IngyRN
    I just moved th the greater Cincinnati area from the northeast. I have never felt so out of place. I know there is a Hispanic community here, but in the hospital and in my neighborhood I feel like people look and speak down to me ( as if they have never seen "my kind"), they are rude and short. So much for that midwest warm welcome. And they say northeasterners are rude! I have never felt this kind this feeling-I can assure you I DO NOT like it-good thing I am only in OH for 1 year. It makes me so sad and angry at the same time. I am not sure how to handle this in a professional and assertive without getting upset.
    Can you give some examples? What makes you sure it's based on you being Hispanic?
  8. Visit  Vito Andolini} profile page
    2
    Quote from molly16
    people are never going to understand that hispanic people are not worms we are human being. I really don't know what to do if I should drop out of the nursing program because I really like nursing, I'm a really nice person that love helping other people and care about them, I'm taking this career not for the money because I really don't need it. but I don't want to work with ****** females or feel out of place.
    Nursing is definitely not for you if you don't want to work with **** females.
    RN1982 and FireStarterRN like this.
  9. Visit  SuesquatchRN} profile page
    5
    Quote from mimilinda77
    Anyway, at my particular hospital in Southern California being hispanic facilitates communication with my patients, and while not making me fully culturally competent (this takes, in my opinion, years of advanced studies in sociology!) much more culturally aware.(good luck)!
    I've discovered that a kind smile and gentle touch go far to dispel cultural differences.

    rustyspoon, BBFRN, VickyRN, and 2 others like this.
  10. Visit  olympus_15} profile page
    0
    i agree with you!!!
    some people are rude, but i ignore them. i've been here 6 years and i have no only my cna, r/n license, but also i have a texas cosmetologist license. and i want to study moreeeeeeeeeeee
    my accent??? yes it is part of my everyday life. my daughter told me one day___ mom you speak english like if you have a gum in your mouth_ __jajaja i answered, yes... but i speak 2 languages, i understand everything.
    i don't let nobody abuse or do something against me because my accent or because i'm from mexico. no srrrrrrrrrrr!!!! i think if one day i have a situation like that!!! i'll answer. ___yes you speak english with no accent, but do you have what i have ( r/ n). because most people who make fun, are people who have a lower rank at work. they can't understand how somebody from another country and with accent can make more money.!!!
    thank you god because in 2 years i learned to communicate here!!!!
    don't let anything stop your dreams!!!!!
  11. Visit  chaxanmom} profile page
    0
    Quote from molly16
    can you please tell me your or her success story, how did you overcome your obstacles(I'm not talking about financial aid) did you get respected working as a nurse?
    http://www.cc.nih.gov/nursing/nursin...rch_Staff.html A good friend of mine is on here. Dr. Rivera-Goba. Definitely a success story for hispanic nurses. She's also done some research on the nursing school experiences of hispanic nurses. Google her and you should find some encouraging info.

    Here's an article she wrote that you might be interested in. http://www.minoritynurse.com/feature...02-14-01e.html
  12. Visit  Bortaz, RN} profile page
    0
    I'm one of about 5-7 white students in a nursing program that is otherwise fully hispanic, so...I know how you feel. Patients, staff, instructors, and classmates all constantly speak in Spanish around and to me, knowing full well I'm not fluent with the language.

    It's common to be identified as "that white man". I've had several patients talk about me (in Spanish), thinking I knew nothing of the language (I can understand some), while I was standing right there.

    Just last week, I had an instructor tell me "I can't believe you're in school to be a nurse, and don't know Spanish...you need to really work on your Spanish if you want a good grade in clinical."
  13. Visit  chaxanmom} profile page
    0
    In some states medical Spanish really is necessary. I got my LVN in California and worked there as a CNA as well. I had taken 5 years of Spanish in school and forgot most of it butI relearned it really quick!
  14. Visit  MELYRN} profile page
    0
    I am a Hispanic nursing student and in my Lpn clinical round I encountered a Hispanic male nurse that seem to have changed his race or something like that. My cousin was a traveling nurse and she had her share of discrimination. Hispanics in general get looked down on and once a Hispanic turns professinal it's the worst most of the time. Some act like only their people can be professional. But hey we're not here to please everyone just do our jobs without being bias like them!


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