Anyone start their career late in Life? - page 70

I would be happy to hear from anyone here that started their career late in life, perhaps Nursing is a second career. For a number of reasons, I am seriously considering changing careers, and for a... Read More

  1. by   KeithT66
    Graduated at 43!!!!!!! Going to school as an adult is far easier than when I did it 20 + years ago. No one ever made me feel old and most of the people in my class were 20's-30's. I found that the instructors took me more seriously than some of the others and some of them were younger than me too. GOOD LUCK
  2. by   tobesmartt
    Quote from toddster
    I would be happy to hear from anyone here that started their career late in life, perhaps Nursing is a second career. For a number of reasons, I am seriously considering changing careers, and for a number of reasons am looking at a career as a Nurse as a possibility. I am a 44/yo Male with a BA and a Masters degree, though not in life sciences, BA in business and Masters in Information Systems. I would be most appreciative to anyone with similar circomstances to share their experiences. I will be reposting this every few days so If I offend, I extend my humble appology in advance.

    Thanks,

    Todd
    Why? as we get older our bodies ache, stress of this nursing is more now then ever. Rethink it. If it's your calling ...go for it..good luck
  3. by   123_ashley
    Quote from MarieD
    I am about to enter an RN program at the age of 60! I have worked as an accountant for many years and raised three children - becoming a nurse is a life-long goal - something I have always wanted to do.
    So have you reached your goal? i am interested to know since i wanted to go back into nursing too.
  4. by   123_ashley
    Quote from logic2go
    hey todd,
    just go for it--i am 53 and just finishing lvn training and i love it! it is a third career for me; i have a bs in business. i plan to go on for my rn. if you enjoy something, it doesn't matter how old you are. being more "mature nurses," we bring wisdom and life experience into the classroom and the clinical setting--the patients love us and are comfortable with us because we are older.
    hello, i am a new comer, and i am curious about all these over 50's folks who started late in their life into nursing. how are your goal since posted the thread? have you graduated, have you find work? let me know, because i am also interested in nursing too.
  5. by   tobesmartt
    Quote from 123_ashley
    so have you reached your goal? i am interested to know since i wanted to go back into nursing too. :d
    wow! if you are a young 60 and that is your calling..go for it! much luck to you.
    nursing is a demanding job, it's has it's challenges. best wishes to you.
  6. by   whodatnurse
    I'm a new nurse who graduated in August of 2009. I'm also a baby boomer, and being of that generation, have always believed that heading down the path of personal fulfillment superseded everything else when it came to making career moves. Then came the great recession of the 21st century. The realities of this new world are dramatically different from the ones that shaped our sensibilities during our young and middle adulthood. First hard knock: Jobs are no longer abundant in any discipline, yes even in that "at least you can always get a job" job of nursing. It took me 15 months from when I graduated to get a job, during which I drained all of my savings. There are many others on this site with similar stories, as well as many others who are still not working. Second hard knock: The cost of education has quadrupled since boomers were of college age. If a BSN is what you're after, depending on where you live, you could expect to shell out 30K or more for a second bachelor's degree. An ADN, of course, would be the cheaper route, but those programs too have been forced to raise their tuition dramatically over these past several years. I only point these things out so you can make an informed decision with your eyes wide open. They need to be considered so you can decide whether or not returning to school is a risk you can afford to take. Having said that, I love nursing and am very glad, despite the bumps, for having pursued this dream.
  7. by   MBARN
    Go for it. I received my BSN at 49. Nursing keeps me in shape! There are 62 year old nurses running circles around 22 year olds that are always complaining about night shift! Plus nursing is so flexible that you can do some many types of jobs that don't involve the bedside! Godspeed to you!
  8. by   123_ashley
    Quote from tobesmartt
    wow! if you are a young 60 and that is your calling..go for it! much luck to you.
    nursing is a demanding job, it's has it's challenges. best wishes to you.
    [font=book antiqua]in fact i am a 'young 60', out of job for a long time. then someone suggest i investigate health care professions, i started by taking cna classes and about to graduate. now i am aiming at lpn, then maybe rn i don't know? if finacially feasible.. i llike to read more about late boomers (or starters in nursing) and how their experiences have been.
  9. by   Jenn_B
    Now I am encouraged! I am 39 and making a life/career change into nursing. I just found out today that I was accepted into school!
  10. by   joanna73
    I've finished my BSN at 37. I have been a nurse for 2 months Lots to learn, but I am really enjoying it. Despite the fact that the economy is so awful, don't let that discourage you. It can't stay this way forever. And BTW, I work with a seasoned nurse who is in her late 60's. She is awesome!
  11. by   ShaBBy23
    [font="comic sans ms"][color="darkslategray"]i was 46 when i graduated from nursing school with a bsn. i'm now going on 49. hope to get my msn before i retire though:grad:
  12. by   39justgettingstarted
    MBARN - I saw your post - you said you were 48 when you went back to school and 49 when you finished? i also have an MBA but i have a BA undergrad. i do want to earn a nursing degree in an accelerated progam and complete in 1 year. how did you do it? did you have to take many prerequisites? i was curious to ask. thanks for any info you may have.
  13. by   chuckster
    Quote from 39justgettingstarted
    MBARN - I saw your post - you said you were 48 when you went back to school and 49 when you finished? i also have an MBA but i have a BA undergrad. i do want to earn a nursing degree in an accelerated progam and complete in 1 year. how did you do it? did you have to take many prerequisites? i was curious to ask. thanks for any info you may have.
    Like you and MBARN, I have both a BA and MBA. Unlike both of you, I was signifcantly older when I completed nursing school. So it definately is doable for the older adult though it is a bit difficult, especially if you are working full-time. For 2 full years, I was in the office 50 - 60 hours a week from Mon- Fri, had nursing classes one or 2 nights each week and clinicals every Sat and Sun for most of each day. Summers were a lot easier: Though I still needed to take a class, it was a nursing elective with no clinical component. Like I said, doable but difficult (not to mention tough on the family).

    As far as classes, most of your grad B-school courses won't really be applicable toward an ADN or BSN, except possibly statistics. Your undergrad courses will fulfill many/most of the non-nursing, non-science degree requirements (English, math, history, etc). Most nursing programs require some social sciences (at least soc and psych) and you will almost certainly need Developmental and maybe Abnormal Psych as well. You will need 1 or 2 semesters of Bio, maybe also Micro and Nutrition and probably at least one semester of Chem. You will of course also need Anatomy & Phisiology. Some schools are particular about the timing for science courses - in my case, I had to repeat Anatomy (my school had separate A&P courses) because I was outside of their 5-year window. I was in an ADN program so in addition to the pre-reqs, there were the nursing classes (4), all with a clincical component (38 semester-hours total). For a BSN you will have another ~30 sh of nursing classes (5 - 6 classes) on top of what I've mentioned so far, though most of these thankfully do not have a siginficant clinical element. I'm planning to start an RN-BSN program in the Fall and it looks like I will need "only" 5 additional classes for that degree. A can of corn compared to the ADN.

    Now as far as finding a nursing job after all of this . . .

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