Anyone start their career late in Life? - page 7

by toddster 230,644 Views | 1006 Comments

I would be happy to hear from anyone here that started their career late in life, perhaps Nursing is a second career. For a number of reasons, I am seriously considering changing careers, and for a number of reasons am looking at... Read More


  1. 1
    Go For It! I was a union organizer - organizing healthcare workers, mostly RN's and I was so inspired by the nurses I worked with and the great changes happening with more H/C workers organizing and having a say ((sic) not co-dependent, passive aggressive type say, but real voice) in pt care, their own safety, advocacy, salaries and benefits. I never thought I would be a nurse, but it is a calling and mine came. It's never too late, but I will say if you are older get inshape, drop the weight, quit smoking, start taking care of yourself, because school is hard-especially if you are going to also work-have kids-relationship, etc. and nursing is physically hard work even in best circumstances. There are many options out there other than acute nsg, but u need to get a few yrs of clinical experience (at least).I'm the 2nd oldest in my program-Good Luck and Go Union.
    calliesue likes this.
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    I'm 54 now, and having difficulty finding a program that can accept transfer credits from my MS in Human Nutrition (3.84 GPA), MFA in Writing, BA in Counseling Psych, and 12 credits towards an MA in Counseling Psych. I live in a semi-rural area on the VT/NH border, and although there's a great teaching hospital here, there are no hospital-based training programs for becoming LPNs & RNs. There's a local community technical college that has a 2-year waiting list (which would have me starting at 56 1/2 years old); no schools within an hour's commute have openings at this time for nursing students due to lack of sufficient faculty members.

    So, I'm thinking of relocating from VT to Denver, CO and doing St. Regis' accelerated BSN program; it takes only a year for those with transferrable credits and appropriate prerequisites. I hope I get in--they have few openings and are highly competitive. And I hope I can figure out the finances that would allow me to relocate and pay their relatively high (out-of-state) tuition. I am not able to get Federally-funded student loans for an Associate's degree (since I have a BA and two Master's degrees)--but must apply for higher-interest-rate vocational/career loans. Because the in-state school is full and has a long waiting list, I must pay the much higher 'out-of-state' tuition rates--and the cost of relocation--to attend school hours away from my current home--or across the country, perhaps!

    It's really a shame that there are not more opportunities for mature adults to get training for licensure as RNs in central/northern VT/NH, and that so many doors are closed to folks who have life experience that would be incredibly valuable to becoming great RNs! How can the nursing shortage be alleviated when such high barriers and difficult obstacles litter the path to getting a seat in a local nursing school?

    However, I really want to become an RN, so...onward I trod, plod, or plow! If anyone knows of any accelerated BSN programs for folks with no experience in nursing, please let me know!
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    I went nursing school when my youngest child was a freshman in college. I was 45. There was one student older than me in our class, and he was 55. Ours was a very close-knit class and we studied together and helped each other. I was worried at first that I would feel out-of-place, but the first week of classes ended those fears. I graduated almost a year ago and went directly into an ICU Internship program that lasted 4 months. I absolutely love what I'm doing! My previous background was real estate, which I did not like, working for my husband, a urologist, for 10 years (still am one day a week), and my favorite ongoing role as a Mom. You are never too old. Good luck!
    mrsz1968 and calliesue like this.
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    I am 44 and in my first semester as an endorsed enrolled nurse. I have been an a.i.n for two years and am not the oldest in the class. Prior to this I was a wife and stay at home mum. Never too late to start or change to nursing.
    calliesue likes this.
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    Todd,

    Hello! I want to let you know I am 44 years old and doing my pre-req.'s for nursing. By the time I get done I will be 47 or 48 years old. You go dude. It is never to late to get a career. Right know I am a medical assistant for a dermatology office where I am also a backofficew manager. I am finally at the piont of my life whrer I am at the opportunity beabling to get a career. So go for it.
    calliesue likes this.
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    hi all --
    my first "reply" -- scanning a lot of the replies -- looks like i am the oldest by far -- i will be 57 this month -- i start nursing school in january. can't beat that with a stick!
    carol
    student forever and calliesue like this.
  7. 6
    I graduated with my nursing degree at the age of 38 and am now 40. The old adage "it's never too late" did not hold true for me. I was diagnosed with a rare cancer called Leiomyosarcoma, stage IV, 9 months before graduation. I underwent a thoracotomy and TAH/BSO over the summer, as well as six cycles of Adriamycin, Ifosfomide, and Mesna during my last and most difficult year of nursing. I attended class and clinicals wearing a mask when neutropenic, and took zofran for the N/V. I was determined to become a nurse. I was hired on the med/ surg floor at a local hospital one month after graduation and continued evening school for perioperative nursing (My hope was to be an RNFA in surgery some day). Six months of this and my next CT scan indicated many new tumors. I have spent the last 8 months on medical leave after nephrectomy, a failed chemo trial and two thoracoctomy's for 269 lung mets (4mm- 1 cm, removed in Germany by laser resection, standard procedure in Europe). I have not given up hope of returning to nursing, but I now must begin another chemo trial 3000 miles from my home due to 20 new very small lung mets. No time for work. I cherish those six months of work on the med/surg floor and admire all of you who choose to dedicate yourself to the field of nursing. Kim
  8. 4
    I think I have everyone beat. I just graduated in May 05 and I am 58yr. I have never done anything according to anyone else's schedule...I went to college the first time in my late 30's graduated before 40yr. Now twenty yrs. later...I still want a BA in Health Care Management or something. It was hard at times but I don't think it had anything to do with my age. I am now working on a telemetry floor, what pace....I like it but onle want to do that two day a week. I also just got a job working for my favorite doctor 2-3 days a week. I am a nutritionist also, and have been for 18 yrs.
    I happen to work on a floor with people my age and also the youngsters. The older nurses give better care, hands down. The younger nurses have good skills and know a lot but just don't have the touch people need...now that is just where I work. The biggest fear I had going to school was my age. I totally dressed down, no jewelry, no good clothes...it was funny. The "kids" loved me and I studied with a bunch of 18 yrs. olds...pretty funny.
    I get along better with people 20 yrs. younger than I, or at least 10 yrs.younger. It is difficult for me to date people my age. I don't want to go too young but when they are 58yr. they seem so old....how are you doing?
  9. 0
    Quote from canicare4u
    I graduated with my nursing degree at the age of 38 and am now 40. The old adage "it's never too late" did not hold true for me. I was diagnosed with a rare cancer called Leiomyosarcoma, stage IV, 9 months before graduation. I underwent a thoracotomy and TAH/BSO over the summer, as well as six cycles of Adriamycin, Ifosfomide, and Mesna during my last and most difficult year of nursing. I attended class and clinicals wearing a mask when neutropenic, and took zofran for the N/V. I was determined to become a nurse. I was hired on the med/ surg floor at a local hospital one month after graduation and continued evening school for perioperative nursing (My hope was to be an RNFA in surgery some day). Six months of this and my next CT scan indicated many new tumors. I have spent the last 8 months on medical leave after nephrectomy, a failed chemo trial and two thoracoctomy's for 269 lung mets (4mm- 1 cm, removed in Germany by laser resection, standard procedure in Europe). I have not given up hope of returning to nursing, but I now must begin another chemo trial 3000 miles from my home due to 20 new very small lung mets. No time for work. I cherish those six months of work on the med/surg floor and admire all of you who choose to dedicate yourself to the field of nursing. Kim
    Kim, thank you so much for taking the time to share your story with us. You will be in my prayers. Please feel free to come back and post often.
  10. 0
    I was a trained nurse. I have been away from nursing for the past 23 years. I am now 53++ and I am seriously thinking about going back to nursing. It is not a new career. May be the right word is re-entering but how do I go about doing it? I don't live in US


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