Anyone start their career late in Life? - page 61

I would be happy to hear from anyone here that started their career late in life, perhaps Nursing is a second career. For a number of reasons, I am seriously considering changing careers, and for a... Read More

  1. by   AZ_LPN_8_26_13
    Quote from izeofblu1973
    Please dont take this the wrong way, Im not trying to be mean. I am just expressing my opinion. Here goes:
    I think that people that are about 50 or older should not be admitted to nursing school or should be admitted last. I believe this because they are taking the place of a younger nurse that would stay in the career for 30, 40 or 50 years. If you will retire in 10 years, you contribute to the problem of baby boomers retiring and causing a shortage.
    Dont get me wrong, I think older students are usually better students. and older new grads can make very good nurses, I just think that the younger ones should have preference in getting into a school that has a wait list.
    What does everyone else think?

    Time for analytical and critical thinking skills here. Part of that is challenging assumptions that may or may not necessarily be true. Who is to say that younger nurses will necessarily stay in their career 30, 40, or 50 years? In today's work world, the average worker will change jobs six or seven times during their work life, and will actually totally change careers at least once. A more likely scenario today would be a nurse who started in nursing school at 18, and is totally burned out at 30, and is either by then in a different career, or if they are still a nurse, are working in some other setting than a hospital or direct patient bedside care.

    Not everyone who is 50-something and in school for nursing (I am one) plans on retiring in 10 years. Here's my plan - get through nursing school, becoming an RN. Work in the hospital where I'm working now for a fair number of years, gaining experience and certification in everything I possibly can. Continuing education including an MSN. When I reach the point where I maybe no longer want to, or can, keep up with the "grind", possibly I can be a nursing educator/mentor with the education and experience I've gained over the years to finish out my career. I can easily picture myself being a nursing educator or instructor in my 70's. The idea of "retirement" has never held any sort of attraction for me. We live in a different world now and part of that is that our ideas of the concepts of careers and retirement have changed too.

    My belief is that if we are going to start assigning people to the front of the line or to the back, it should be done using objective standards such as GPA, exam scores, etc. Assigning people to the front or back based on chronological age to me is in the same league as quotas based on gender, ethnic origin, that sort of thing.

    Please don't think I'm taking offense to your question - it's a legitimate question, but to me it shows a certain amount of restricted thinking. No one can accurately forsee who will contribute what in the future in any career or endeavor. Just two examples of famous people who actually began "careers" they became famous for are Benjamin Franklin and Winston Churchill. Both were actually way past what was considered prime years when they were called to duty. Of course their life experience and education helped prepare them for their moments in history, but the point is that both of them were at an age where they could have just collected a pension and said "heck with it" and stayed home. Franklin was in his 70's during the American Revolution and was sort of the elder statesman of the Founding Fathers. Winston Churchill was actually in his 60's when he finally got the call to be Prime Minister during the darkest days of WWII. Many people at that time considered his career to be over. The British people re-elected him PM again in 1951.
  2. by   waterpaint
    79 pages of posts later and I think it's safe to say that the majority of us support the OP's decision to start their career "late in the game"

    GO GET EM!

  3. by   peaceful
    Quote from VickyRN
    Yes, please take your concerns about the older students and demographics to another thread, thank you. This is a thread meant for encouragement to the older student.
    T

    Thank you for your response to the post regarding nursing school should be for younger nurses only. People are living longer, retiring later. Everybody should be encourged to follow their passion in education no matter the age! I going back for my FNP at 52 years old. I plan to work many years. Getting accepted to nursing school is based on GPA, NOT age, always has been. I was able to go to nursing school for my BSN at 46 years old. Yes I beat out younger students because my GPA was higher. The post that people should not go back to school b/c of age is absolutely ridiculous! Thanks for listening.
  4. by   BabyCatchr
    I am 40 and just beginning nursing school. I will probably have to work until I am 75 years old - that is 35 years. A 50 year old could easily work for 25 years. People can frequently no longer afford to retire when they are 65, especially with the social security age being raised and life expectancy increasing.

    Quote from izeofblu1973
    Please dont take this the wrong way, Im not trying to be mean. I am just expressing my opinion. Here goes:
    I think that people that are about 50 or older should not be admitted to nursing school or should be admitted last. I believe this because they are taking the place of a younger nurse that would stay in the career for 30, 40 or 50 years. If you will retire in 10 years, you contribute to the problem of baby boomers retiring and causing a shortage.
    Dont get me wrong, I think older students are usually better students. and older new grads can make very good nurses, I just think that the younger ones should have preference in getting into a school that has a wait list.
    What does everyone else think?
    **You also said:**
    My point is not that older new grads wouldnt make good nurses. They most certainly would. My point is that the profession of nursing would benefit from younger nurses, so that there would not be more baby boomers reitring all at the same time. The profession and the community would benefit, not the individual older student.

    MY REPLY: Wow, my reply is bordering on the dramatic, but isn't that a bit Hitlerish?? Allow only those that would benefit the country most with their years of service to have those jobs, even though others are perfectly capable? If someone can get through nursing school and pay for it, preventing them from entering the program based solely on age is furthering the notion that once we are past a certain age, we are worthless. Just dump us all in the nursing home and bury us up to our necks so you don't have to care for us. wow.
    Last edit by BabyCatchr on Aug 27, '09
  5. by   mswhite
    my dear...you said that you're not trying to be mean? lets see...a 50 year old woman who finally decides to fullfil a long time dream...probably after years of self-sacrifice to raise a family....you feel she shouldn't go to nursing school because she is too old...she may retire in 10 years..so why even bother with an education? what do you suggest she do? you may not have meant to be mean spirited...but you are. this blog is designed to motivate men and women who may feel too old to dream. you sound like one of my friends who felt that i wouldn't hack it in nursing school. i am a nurse today and she's still sitting at home. I hope you do some serious self reflection and change your way of thinking.
  6. by   izeofblu1973
    To the people that addressed the issue, not the "insult":
    If you are saying that you are gonna start nursing school at age 55 and work until you are 75, it is unlikely. It is possible but unlikely. I have never met a 75year old Rn still working. As a matter of fact, I dont think I have ever met a 65 year old full time nurse.
    Young nurses go out on disability for back injuries, how is a 75 year old gonna give CPR, boost people in bed, hold down an ETOHer, etc? Possible, but unlikely.
    My point is that younger nurses are more likely to spend more time being nurses and not retire at the same time as the baby boomers and leave a huge hole.
    To those people that took this an insult:
    I am not saying that older, new nurses would not have anything to offer. I have nothing against older nurses, I have gained a lot of knowledge from older nurses.
    I am sorry that I invaded a thread that was supposed to be supportive, I did not see that written anywhere. The thread said "Anyone start their career late in life?". I thought that meant that opinions about starting late in life were being solicited. I dont think I was rude. I do, however, believe that I have been called a couple of names. Please dont compare my opinion to Hitler, it diminishes the halocaust. I find that offensive to the people that suffered unspeakable torture and thier memories.
  7. by   NRSKarenRN
    Per ANA's 2008 Biennial House of Delegates meeting, 1 in 2 RN's leave their first job in less than a year...residency programs recommended to reverse this trend.
    New graduate nurses leave their first nursing position at an alarming rate. Over half of new graduate nurses leave their first professional nursing assignment in less than one year. Neophyte nurses chose to leave the nursing profession due to role overload, job dissatisfaction, stress, low self-efficacy, and physician-staff relationships. It has been projected that approximately six percent of new graduate nurses become so discouraged during the first year of practice that they choose to leave the nursing profession completely.
    http://www.nursingworld.org/Function...akeAction.aspx
    Mature older students often have a better understanding of what a career entails, understand that each job has plus and minuses and can roll with the punches without expecting "perfection". Health care is moving away from hospital walls over the past 20 years and RN's desired there ---biggest boom will be in home health care.

    On my staff in home care agency currently working FT: 1 25yo, 4 RN's in mid-late 50's, 2 mid 60's and 2 in 70's "retired" but continuing to work part time to keep mind sharp...and pay bills. I had the pleasure of working with an older RN caring for a vent dependent patient in early 90's only to become her Manager in 2002 and see her retire after a 50 year career that started 4 months after I was born.

    One can be sitting in a wheelchair, rocking chair or behind a race car at age 65-75 (think Paul Neuman). It's what YOU want out of life that makes the difference.
  8. by   AZ_LPN_8_26_13
    Quote from izeofblu1973
    To the people that addressed the issue, not the "insult":
    If you are saying that you are gonna start nursing school at age 55 and work until you are 75, it is unlikely. It is possible but unlikely. I have never met a 75year old Rn still working. As a matter of fact, I dont think I have ever met a 65 year old full time nurse.
    Young nurses go out on disability for back injuries, how is a 75 year old gonna give CPR, boost people in bed, hold down an ETOHer, etc? Possible, but unlikely.
    My point is that younger nurses are more likely to spend more time being nurses and not retire at the same time as the baby boomers and leave a huge hole.
    To those people that took this an insult:
    I am not saying that older, new nurses would not have anything to offer. I have nothing against older nurses, I have gained a lot of knowledge from older nurses.
    I am sorry that I invaded a thread that was supposed to be supportive, I did not see that written anywhere. The thread said "Anyone start their career late in life?". I thought that meant that opinions about starting late in life were being solicited. I dont think I was rude. I do, however, believe that I have been called a couple of names. Please dont compare my opinion to Hitler, it diminishes the halocaust. I find that offensive to the people that suffered unspeakable torture and thier memories.

    I am 56 years old.... I'm in better shape now than I was at 26 (really). Not saying this to brag or anything, but I'm frequently mistaken for being younger than I actually am. Shock and surprise when I mention to anyone my actual age... LOL Back injuries? Well, I'm a guy who spent years working in a career where lots of physical labor and sometimes heavy lifting were the norm. Proper lifting techniques and safety will prevent back injuries. People now are living healthier and longer lives - that's a fact and I can personally attest to it. As to what I will be at 75, well, we'll see...... I promise to get back to you in 19 years as to where I'm at and what I'm doing ;-) To all of you out there who are my age or older - watch and be proactive with your health - stay engaged both physically and mentally.
  9. by   nurse101ok
    yes, just graduate in feb of 2009 at age 45
  10. by   anointed2touch RN
    Thank u so much for the encouragement. im 49yrs old and i just got a new job at a major hosp in Dallas on the digestive disease floor and im scared wondering if im too old. they r offering me an internship which is fabulous. i also want to go back for my BSN.
  11. by   nurse101ok
    Good luck on the dd floor we are not old just seasoned (lol)
  12. by   AllieKat
    [font=lucida console]hello aspiring nurses and current nurses,
    [font=lucida console]
    [font=lucida console]this is an absolutely amazing topic. i am just amazed at the wealth of support and encouragement from everyone. this topic is something i was concerned about. i am 35, which to some may seem pretty young, but when you are 35 and possibly faced with a class full of 20 somethings it can be extremely daunting to say the least. however, after having read many of these posts i am feeling a little more reassured.
    [font=lucida console]i have not started any nursing program yet. i would like to do the rn nursing program, but it just doesn't seem feasible. i live in a very remote area. so, my best bet would probably be to do the local lpn program and try to bridge over to the rn; possibly online. the winters here in wny can be absolutely atrocious. so, i don't think it would be smart to travel an hour one way in the dead of winter.
    [font=lucida console]
    [font=lucida console]i previously went to school for medical billing & coding and halfway through realized i loved nursing, but they didn't have a nursing program so i kept trudging along with it. graduated with an associate of applied science degree with honors, no less. i am 35 and a married mom of four. the lpn program is part-time. i wish it were full-time so it wouldn't take nearly as long to reach my goal. i'm not getting any younger and of course, we need the money, but we also need the benefits. but more importantly to me, i want to help people and give back to my community. i have wanted to be a nurse since i was very young, but i just didn't think i was smart enough to achieve it. i just wasn't very good at science in high school. believe it or not though, i absolutely love science and biology now. i took anatomy & physiology i & ii with my degree program and loved it ( got all a's yay me!) there are a few pre-req's i probably won't have to take. i'll have to check into it. the lpn program doesn't start until next september. i was just a little too late anyway, you guys are so inspirational. i am so glad i found this site.
  13. by   mswhite
    good luck alliekat. I completed my lpn program a year ago at the age of 47 and believe it or not, I was not the oldest broad in class. the problem im having now is....i am too beastly tired to study my online BSN program. so think about it first. I suggest for you to bite the bullet and go straight to the BSN program is that's your ultimate goal. good luck in whatever you plan to do

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