Anyone start their career late in Life? - page 6

I would be happy to hear from anyone here that started their career late in life, perhaps Nursing is a second career. For a number of reasons, I am seriously considering changing careers, and for a... Read More

  1. Visit  caosper profile page
    2
    hi all --
    my first "reply" -- scanning a lot of the replies -- looks like i am the oldest by far -- i will be 57 this month -- i start nursing school in january. can't beat that with a stick!
    carol
    student forever and calliesue like this.
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  3. Visit  canicare4u profile page
    6
    I graduated with my nursing degree at the age of 38 and am now 40. The old adage "it's never too late" did not hold true for me. I was diagnosed with a rare cancer called Leiomyosarcoma, stage IV, 9 months before graduation. I underwent a thoracotomy and TAH/BSO over the summer, as well as six cycles of Adriamycin, Ifosfomide, and Mesna during my last and most difficult year of nursing. I attended class and clinicals wearing a mask when neutropenic, and took zofran for the N/V. I was determined to become a nurse. I was hired on the med/ surg floor at a local hospital one month after graduation and continued evening school for perioperative nursing (My hope was to be an RNFA in surgery some day). Six months of this and my next CT scan indicated many new tumors. I have spent the last 8 months on medical leave after nephrectomy, a failed chemo trial and two thoracoctomy's for 269 lung mets (4mm- 1 cm, removed in Germany by laser resection, standard procedure in Europe). I have not given up hope of returning to nursing, but I now must begin another chemo trial 3000 miles from my home due to 20 new very small lung mets. No time for work. I cherish those six months of work on the med/surg floor and admire all of you who choose to dedicate yourself to the field of nursing. Kim
  4. Visit  Aquamarine profile page
    4
    I think I have everyone beat. I just graduated in May 05 and I am 58yr. I have never done anything according to anyone else's schedule...I went to college the first time in my late 30's graduated before 40yr. Now twenty yrs. later...I still want a BA in Health Care Management or something. It was hard at times but I don't think it had anything to do with my age. I am now working on a telemetry floor, what pace....I like it but onle want to do that two day a week. I also just got a job working for my favorite doctor 2-3 days a week. I am a nutritionist also, and have been for 18 yrs.
    I happen to work on a floor with people my age and also the youngsters. The older nurses give better care, hands down. The younger nurses have good skills and know a lot but just don't have the touch people need...now that is just where I work. The biggest fear I had going to school was my age. I totally dressed down, no jewelry, no good clothes...it was funny. The "kids" loved me and I studied with a bunch of 18 yrs. olds...pretty funny.
    I get along better with people 20 yrs. younger than I, or at least 10 yrs.younger. It is difficult for me to date people my age. I don't want to go too young but when they are 58yr. they seem so old....how are you doing?
  5. Visit  VickyRN profile page
    0
    Quote from canicare4u
    I graduated with my nursing degree at the age of 38 and am now 40. The old adage "it's never too late" did not hold true for me. I was diagnosed with a rare cancer called Leiomyosarcoma, stage IV, 9 months before graduation. I underwent a thoracotomy and TAH/BSO over the summer, as well as six cycles of Adriamycin, Ifosfomide, and Mesna during my last and most difficult year of nursing. I attended class and clinicals wearing a mask when neutropenic, and took zofran for the N/V. I was determined to become a nurse. I was hired on the med/ surg floor at a local hospital one month after graduation and continued evening school for perioperative nursing (My hope was to be an RNFA in surgery some day). Six months of this and my next CT scan indicated many new tumors. I have spent the last 8 months on medical leave after nephrectomy, a failed chemo trial and two thoracoctomy's for 269 lung mets (4mm- 1 cm, removed in Germany by laser resection, standard procedure in Europe). I have not given up hope of returning to nursing, but I now must begin another chemo trial 3000 miles from my home due to 20 new very small lung mets. No time for work. I cherish those six months of work on the med/surg floor and admire all of you who choose to dedicate yourself to the field of nursing. Kim
    Kim, thank you so much for taking the time to share your story with us. You will be in my prayers. Please feel free to come back and post often.
  6. Visit  syong profile page
    0
    I was a trained nurse. I have been away from nursing for the past 23 years. I am now 53++ and I am seriously thinking about going back to nursing. It is not a new career. May be the right word is re-entering but how do I go about doing it? I don't live in US
  7. Visit  Carolyn44057 profile page
    2
    I graduated with ADN in 1998 at age 53. I am surprised that no one has posted that it was a mistake. I was working in a hospital as a medical records coder, 8am-4:30pm 5 days a week, no weekends, holidays off, 4 weeks vacation and earning $2 an hour less than a starting RN. I went to school on a full ride with hospital tuition reimbursement. Nursing school was gruelling and I didn't have a life for 2 1/2 years. I did well though, graduating 2nd in the class, magna cum laude. I have a multihandicapped son who was 28 at the time and had just moved into his own home with two other handicapped clients. We had some free time for the first time since he was born. Now I was going to take a nursing job, working night shift, holidays and weekends, working my butt off for a couple bucks more? I don't think so. I kept my coding job & turned down the nursing career.

    As luck would have it (or bad luck), my son had surgery and developed respiratory complications and came home with a new tracheostomy, feeding tube and a seizure disorder in addition to the profound MR/CP & Type I Diabetes that he already had. He requires 24 hr. nursing in addition to the aides he already had caring for him through his I/O waiver. Since I had kept my nursing license, I am able to do some of that nursing care by working through a home health agency and also get paid for doing it. I also manage 4 independent LPN's who care for him. Do I regret getting my degree? Not at all. Do I wish I had gotten the few years of hospital nursing experience? Yes, I do. But I believe that God led me to nursing so that I would be able to quit working and be available to care for my son.

    Make sure you know that you want to really make the sacrifices that nursing requires. Had it not been for my son needing nursing care, I don't believe I would be doing any nursing. Even though I went to school to fulfill a lifelong dream, it turned out not to be the dream that I thought it was. Because I didn't do the expected transition of going in to hospital nursing, I still feel I never fulfilled the dream, but I just couldn't do it. Having said all that, I am happy and enjoying my life right now. My son is doing very well and I am glad that I can help him in every way that he needs.
    calliesue and afranklin like this.
  8. Visit  Mermaid profile page
    1
    I am 42 years old and will be graduating with my BSN in December and starting my new career as an Oncology nurse after I pass the NCLEX in January. It has been tough going back at my age what with all the other responsiblities but I feel as if my new life is just beginning.

    My inspiration has been my Nurse Practioneer in my OBGYNs office, she raised her children as I did, and got her BSN at age 43, worked for several years to help get her children through college and then went back to school for her masters degree at age 53. She now works in a busy OBGYNs office and I always get a much more better exam from her then I ever have from the docs.
    calliesue likes this.
  9. Visit  alegea23 profile page
    0
    i'm 30 yrs. old and have a b.s. in psychology. the only job i am able to get is a mental health counselor. to make more money, i would need to get my masters and could even go past that. i have decided to go into nursing. there are so many opportunities with nursing. my mom has been a nurse for 15 years. i just got accepted into the lpn nursing program, which starts in january. i then plan to get my rn. i should finish up with my lpn by decemeber 2006. i am so psyched about my future and know i have made the right choice.
  10. Visit  skwirlygirl profile page
    0
    Hello..... I just turned 34 in August... and graduated in May! Opportunities are endless.... I couldn't feel more fulfilled! GO FOR IT!!!!!!

    My classmates ages ranged from 50 y.o. to 19 y.o. Some were empty nested, some were just starting their family (I had a classmate that was giving birth as we participated in our graduation ceremony). I, being a mother of two young children, persevered through a divorce, relocated almost200 miles away after my divorce, but continued to pursue my career...... I tried to transfer into local colleges and universities where I relocated to, but the waiting lists were ridiculous (not to mention transfer credit issues).....

    I kept in touch with my classmates when I moved (your classmates will become your second family through nursing school), they told me that the the nursing program that I was enrolled in, previous to my relocation, was starting an on-line (pilot) program. After all of the attempts, counselor meetings, pre-tests etc. at the colleges and universities around the area where I relocated to, this news was godsend! I was so disappointed about waiting lists, etc. at the colleges/universities in my area I almost gave up!

    NOT ME! I'MNOT A QUITTER! So I enrolled in the pilot program, I had to travel every week (196 miles) to the college that I began at......... I would leave Tuesday after work so I could attend my clinical's Wednesday and Thursday, and then I would return home Thursday evening. Testing was on campus for the on-line students to ensure security and monitoring (they were planned around commuting students like me). Everything else (on-line discussions, homework, short quiz's, papers, etc.) I could submit online. Graduating for my was a feat!...I worked, I commuted, I studied, cared for 2 children, yadda-yadda......

    I couldn't have succeeded and accomplished my studies without the support, love and sacrifices that my family made for me. They took great care of my children when I was away. When I traveled, I was able to completely focus on my studies because I knew my children were taken care of. I cherish the bonds that were created with my children and my family in my absence.

    Sorry to have rambled on, but......... being that I began pursuing my nursing career when I was in my mid-20's, and graduated when I was 33, and what I had endured during my pursuit (failing marriage, divorce, relocation, communting distance (197 miles one way), gone from my children) I feel those hardships, sacrifices, and failures, that I have gained invaluable wisdom, experience, and self-confidence that only comes with experiences like mine and age.

    I work with other new R.N.'s and because they are so young, I see them getting taken advantage of. They struggle to therapuetically (genuinely verbalize compassion, concern, and embrace) communicate with their patients. We work on an oncology floor.....all of my colleuges are veterans and have worked on the floor for years. I know you learn as you go along, and I have, and I still do........... but I find being that I'm older, have children, have perservered through difficult times, that I have gained wisdom and that I can really connect with my patients. There are many patient that we see repeatedly because of complications and I so enjoy those relationships as I know they do as well.

    FARE WARNING THOUGH>>>>>>>at your (our) age, the nursing profession is definitely a career that eats their young! This topic was even a discussion in our nursing management class in our last semester before we graduated. It was nothing new to me or any of my classmates by then, we had already experienced "the feedings" throughout our clinical's. All of us had already experienced multiple times what the meaning of "eating their young" meant.

    What all of my classmates and I couldn't understand was "why"? Through discussions among ourselves and with our clinical preceptors and instructors participating, we came up with all kinds of explanations/reasons.

    The remaining LPN's (seniority) issues?
    Students focusing on proper techniques (threatening/inferiority)?
    Student/Staff Nurse Abandonment vs. Embrace/Assist (lighten their load)?
    I could go on and on but I won't.......

    I'm the kind of nurse that if I can help anyone, in any way, be it with assisting an NA, or my fellow colleagues, you can count on me! I'm HERE THIS IS WHY I CHOSE THIS CAREER!!!!!!!!!!

    Like I said in the beginning GO FOR IT! It is definately a rewarding profession.
  11. Visit  skwirlygirl profile page
    0
    See my post! You can do it! If God brings you to, you will get through it! I'm now at peace and waiting for the right time to tell my ex "thanks for everything that has made me the woman I am today."
  12. Visit  marylyric profile page
    0
    Quote from canicare4u
    I graduated with my nursing degree at the age of 38 and am now 40. The old adage "it's never too late" did not hold true for me. I was diagnosed with a rare cancer called Leiomyosarcoma, stage IV, 9 months before graduation. I underwent a thoracotomy and TAH/BSO over the summer, as well as six cycles of Adriamycin, Ifosfomide, and Mesna during my last and most difficult year of nursing. I attended class and clinicals wearing a mask when neutropenic, and took zofran for the N/V. I was determined to become a nurse. I was hired on the med/ surg floor at a local hospital one month after graduation and continued evening school for perioperative nursing (My hope was to be an RNFA in surgery some day). Six months of this and my next CT scan indicated many new tumors. I have spent the last 8 months on medical leave after nephrectomy, a failed chemo trial and two thoracoctomy's for 269 lung mets (4mm- 1 cm, removed in Germany by laser resection, standard procedure in Europe). I have not given up hope of returning to nursing, but I now must begin another chemo trial 3000 miles from my home due to 20 new very small lung mets. No time for work. I cherish those six months of work on the med/surg floor and admire all of you who choose to dedicate yourself to the field of nursing. Kim
    Oh what a strong person you are. Your thread touched my heart. I could have never gone to school under those circumstances. Keep your head up, someday you will be a true blessing to someone you are caring for. You keep fighting and believing . God Bless you.
  13. Visit  twigloo profile page
    0
    Quote from toddster
    I would be happy to hear from anyone here that started their career late in life, perhaps Nursing is a second career. For a number of reasons, I am seriously considering changing careers, and for a number of reasons am looking at a career as a Nurse as a possibility. I am a 44/yo Male with a BA and a Masters degree, though not in life sciences, BA in business and Masters in Information Systems. I would be most appreciative to anyone with similar circomstances to share their experiences. I will be reposting this every few days so If I offend, I extend my humble appology in advance.

    Thanks,

    Todd
    Hi Todd,
    I will be 51 when I graduate with a BSN....never too late!!!! When I considered going back to school, a friend asked me: How old will you be when you graduate from Nursing..so I said 51..and then she said How old will be if you don't go back to school.......51........that made my decision
    Good luck!
    Patti
  14. Visit  Tinkerbell2 profile page
    0
    I am 43 years of age, and graduated with a Bachelor Degree
    in General Studies in 2004. I havn't had many "significant"
    jobs throught the years, while being homeaker and mother,
    and have been unable to find a suitable job with this degree.

    I have always been intersted in nursing. I would like to start with a
    ASN, and then bridge over to get my BSN. My husband and I are
    planning to move to Collin County/Dallas TX area next year. Are
    there any readers out there who have attended nursing schools
    in that area ?

    All of the stories that I have read on this thread are very
    encouraging. I would appreciate any tips and advice that
    you have to offer.

    The professors at our local nursing school are reputed
    to "eat their young" also. Is this a widespread consensus
    for all and any nursing school ? Are there any schools with
    professors who actually CARE , or help you ?
    Last edit by Tinkerbell2 on Nov 5, '05


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