Anyone start their career late in Life? - page 59

I would be happy to hear from anyone here that started their career late in life, perhaps Nursing is a second career. For a number of reasons, I am seriously considering changing careers, and for a... Read More

  1. by   Mahage
    Quote from PALPN4018
    I inquired about finishing my RN however my science courses are too old for transfer credits. I am about to turn 50 and do not relish repeating those courses. It took me about 10 years to pay off previous loans and at this point I really do not have the strong desire to finish.

    Does anyone know if Excelsior or other related online sites are acceptable for finishing my RN?
    Yes, many states will accept the online program through Regents. I don't know much about Excelsior. Check on which states accept which online programs. There are many, many accredited on line nursing programs now. Check into the Federal Nursing Subsidies which are available in exchange for working in underserved areas and disproportionate share facilities.

    If you really want to do it, you can.

    Good Luck,
    Mahage
  2. by   AZ_LPN_8_26_13
    Quote from toddster
    I would be happy to hear from anyone here that started their career late in life, perhaps Nursing is a second career. For a number of reasons, I am seriously considering changing careers, and for a number of reasons am looking at a career as a Nurse as a possibility. I am a 44/yo Male with a BA and a Masters degree, though not in life sciences, BA in business and Masters in Information Systems. I would be most appreciative to anyone with similar circomstances to share their experiences. I will be reposting this every few days so If I offend, I extend my humble appology in advance.

    Thanks,

    Todd
    I started back to school for nursing (ADN to become an RN) two years ago at age 54. No medical or clinical experience prior to that. I already have a BS degree, but not in the health or life sciences. I had to take most of the prereqs like A&P I & II, microbiology, algebra, chemistry, psychology, etc. and that is what I've spent most of the last two years doing.... I am now waiting for placement in a local community college nursing program. Will probably start that in the fall semester of 2010 if all goes according to schedule. I was recently accepted into a CNA training program and will hopefully be working as a CNA gaining clinical experience while I am waiting. I will probably be 58 or 59 y.o. by the time I'm all done with this and finally working as an RN.

    Why did I decide to do this? I believe that it is something that I'm being pointed toward, and I look at it as a vocation and a calling, not just another job. It also falls more in line with the type of person I am, my personality, my core values. I look forward to pursuing a vocation where I am actually helping people, and giving back to society. The pay and the opportunities available in nursing don't hurt either. Like someone once said, "There are a thousand ways to be a nurse." I can't off the top of my head think of any other career that gives you as many potential career pathways, or ways to grow and develop.

    My advice is to be proactive with your health, stay active both physically and mentally/intellectually, be open to any and all opportunities to learn and grow. You are never too old to learn, try new things, or reinvent yourself if need be. Best wishes to you and best of luck in your new career path.
  3. by   MimismomRN
    God bless you all!! I just graduated June 7, 2009 with my RN at 51 years old. If I can do it, anyone that wants to do it can do it. It was not easy and I had some meltdowns. I was an LVN for three years before going back for my RN. Now looking forward to finding a job (I have an interview for Labor and delivery on Wed, yahooo). We bring with us or life exerience which the younger kids just don't have. I've wanted to do this all my life. I say better late than never. I have a 24 year old who graduated with her RN two years before me. We can do this and if it is in your heart, you will suceed. Follow your dreams. We get older no matter what. This has given me confidence,self esteem and the courage and knowledge that anything is possible especially with God's help. Could not have done it without him, that's for sure. God bless us all and Just Go Do It!!!nurse: Susan in California (LVN to RN 2009)
  4. by   TrishJK
    Quote from toddster
    ...started their career late in life, ... second career. For a number of reasons, ... I am a 44/yo Male with a BA ... in business and Masters in Information Systems.
    1. What's this "late in life" judgement - are you planning on dying of old age some time soon? Sheesh - I'm older than you and I'm going backwards, feller - next year I'll be 40 again. Tomorrow I may be sixteen - depending on my mood. Get a grip, lad!!

    2. I have had the following "meaningful" careers so far: psychologist, investment banker, retail manager, business analyst, marketing manager, development manager, personal care worker. Soon I'll be an RN and shortly thereafter (yes, I'm already planning my next career) I will be a mental health nurse. Tentative plans from there are along the lines of nursing researcher/nurse teacher. After that, well, we'll see - I like to be flexible.

    3. What reasons? This is the important part of your question and yet we are left to wonder... has he been fired for giving himself a five finger discount? Is he on his way to prison for hacking in to a secure website and helping himself to some loot? Has he had an epiphany?
    Cheers
  5. by   Hopefull nurse
    :heartbeatWow! I have been feeling horrible about starting my nursing career at the age of 31. I graduated from The University of New Orleans with a Business Degree 6 years ago. I absolutely hate it. Now, I am going into nursing and I can't stop thinking "why didn't I do this in the first place? Why did I wait till now, when I am married and have two daughters...what a way to complicate my life now"
    You guys have given me strength and determination. At 50+ you all are just starting and some of you have been successful at acquiring your Nursing degree. If you can do it, I can too! Thanks for posting your success and giving us just starting hope that it can be done! Keep up the good work.
  6. by   Sowinsis
    I am starting at age 52. I have some science behind me as a science teacher which helps. Just take it one step at a time and get the pre-reqs out of the way. By that time you may be able to go into cardiology, radiology or respiratory therapy. You may have a differnent path by the time you get onboard with the community colleges and get to listen to other students. Dive in!!
  7. by   BabyCatchr
    I wanted to PM you but you don't provide that option. I am also a teacher going back for my RN. Can you compare nursing school to your first year as a teacher? Nursing school to teaching? I would like to know the difficulty of the 2 in comparison. I found teaching to be exhausting. Can I handle nursing school?
    Thanks!

    Quote from krisssy
    I am 58. I graduated from nursing school at 22. I worked as a nurse for two years and then as an elementary school teacher for 25 years. I retired a few years ago. I took a refresher course, and now I am applying to get my MS in psychiatric nursing. I have noticed a lot of threads about being too old. One young girl made the wisest comment. She said that we are never too old, because we have no idea when our last day on earth will be anyway. If you really think about it, she is so smart. If you begin a new career at 50 and stay in it for at least 20 years, you have done a good thing! Someone else said that age is not the problem, saying "I Can" is. I would suggest that you do a search for all the threads on this subject. You will learn a lot and get a lot of encouragement from people of all ages. Just do what you want to do, and forget about age as a factor completely-that is my advice to you! krisssy
  8. by   mswhite
    you can do anything you set your mind to. I started an LPN program at the age of 45. Graduated at 47 while raising 6 children and having a full-time job. I had an instructor who told me that I would not make a good nurse. she looked at my age as opposed to my ability. Today, I'm one of the best nurses working at a LTC. what makes me one of the best, is my dedication and hard work. a lot of those nurses simply dont care...they are there for a paycheck. i treat my pts as if they are my family. my nurturing ability comes to work with me. most older nurses are like that....yes, there are some who are in the field way too long. if you want to be a nurse...just do it! forget about age. your age can be your best asset. good luck
  9. by   BMCLVN
    I worked in health care for a long time then went to retail and ended up back in health care. I got my LVN license while working full time in Assisted Living. when I was 47. I found school to be a big culture shock, filled with young people. It was very intimidating, but you know what? I graduated as the class Valedictorian. It was a wonderful experience. I love health care and would encourage anyone who has a passion to provide people with a smile, a kind word and care should give it a try. Good luck on your adventure!
  10. by   Sowinsis
    Recently, I had a friend tell me that when she went to RN school the oldest you could be was 54. One student nurse in her class was 54. My friend had contact with old friends who said the 54 year old nurse was still nursing until the age of 89. She just celebrated her 91st birthday. I was glad to hear the story because I am 52. I start community college this morning to sit in a 101 class with the youngest of the bunch freshman.
  11. by   Mahage
    Quote from Sowinsis
    Recently, I had a friend tell me that when she went to RN school the oldest you could be was 54. One student nurse in her class was 54. My friend had contact with old friends who said the 54 year old nurse was still nursing until the age of 89. She just celebrated her 91st birthday. I was glad to hear the story because I am 52. I start community college this morning to sit in a 101 class with the youngest of the bunch freshman.
    Gooooo Soooooo! I was sort of the odd one out around here, but I noticed a few late 30's and 40's in the community college classes that come do clincials on our floors. I will have to work till I am 89 to pay off my loans!
    Mahage:smackingf
  12. by   MimismomRN
    God bless all of us ladies with life experience. Don't let age hold you back. If you want to be a nurse, just go do it. I am 51 years old graduated from the LVN program at 47 and just graduated with my RN June, 2009. I just found out this morning I passed my boards. I love my patients and caring for them. I think we have the ability to be great nurses because we have lived our lives and have obtained great wisdom from that which helps us in our jobs. Don't give up, follow your dream. I worked as a paralegal for 25 years and hated pushing paper. I always wanted to be a nurse and after losing my mom to MS four years ago, I quit my job and went back to school to do what I knew God had called me to do all my life. If I can do it, anyone can do it. I struggled, it was not easy, but nothing worthwhile in life is. I have a 24 year old daughter who is also an RN. God helped me get through school and the NCLEX and he will help you also. Keep looking up! God bless you all.

    Susan LVN to RN 2009
  13. by   geegee12
    I graduated with my BSN in 2005 at age 53. School was challenging (I just don't memorize as well as I used to) plus I had to keep a 24 hour-a-week job for the health insurance (can't be without it at my age: go health care reform!)
    Getting experience was even more challenging. I chose to work on a med-surg hospital floor where I had more incredible experiences than you can imagine and learned even more. Our "seasoning" helps in many difficult situations (although we are often assumed to be the "head nurse") because we have probably learned to talk to and listen to people. WARNING: be careful of your physical condition! After injuring my back with a 400 lb patient i've had to accept that I'm not 25 anymore. It's too easy to do.

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