Anyone start their career late in Life? - page 53

I would be happy to hear from anyone here that started their career late in life, perhaps Nursing is a second career. For a number of reasons, I am seriously considering changing careers, and for a... Read More

  1. by   oomalava
    Honestly-if you're considering becoming a nurse as a person with a few miles behind him, I encourage you wholeheartedly. This profession takes a interesting blend of skills and talents, and not everyone has them in their 20s and 30s. I know I didn't. But since 50 is the new 30, you'll have a lot of years of fruitful work ahead of you as a nurse!

    I'm 52; my previous career was in teaching and arts administration. I graduated from Nursing school at 50 and have worked as a floor nurse since then. If you can do the prerequisites well -Anatomy and Physiology, Micro, Genetics- you will have no problem with the academic side of nursing school. And I think you will find that your age and life experience will actually work to your advantage in your coursework and clinicals once you are in nursing school- you know how to pace yourself, you can read people much better than a 22-year-old can..... and you are probably capable of writing a coherent paragraph, which was a huge problem for the younger members of my class. In my case, having real- world experience behind me worked to my advantage as a floor nurse; when I was first hired I was the only one of the new grads given a day shift position because my extensive non-nursing resume showed I was an experienced multi-tasker.
    You're wise to keep asking questions of people in the profession. You'll get a sense of whether it's for you or not.
  2. by   Caralina2362
    Quote from donster
    Todd,

    I'm 48 and in my first semester of nursing school. I already have a degree in business, so this is a second career for me.

    And, believe it or not, I'm not the oldest in my class. There are lots of us out there, and these forums are a great place to connect with others who can share and inspire.

    Much good luck and success to you, whatever you decide to do.

    Don
    Don I loved your reply. ANNNND, as a 46 year old new career-cat lovin' woman, ROCK ON! I am researching nursing... will be ther soon so it was uplifting to see your reply to this person....

    C
  3. by   jett01
    I was 40 when I graduated nursing school. Now, 7 years later I manage the unit where I started. Not the path I would have anticipated at the beginning of my career but it has been a rewarding one. (Been at it now for about 3 years). I now impact not just the care of 5 or so patients at a time, but potentially up to 39 patients as well as the careers of 80-90 health care professionals. What an opportunity to make a difference.
  4. by   mika23
    Yes there is especially in New Zealand, I talked to a one of the
    nurse in the Wairaki region and they informed me that they had to
    close one of their wards because they were lacking nurses their.

    They have tried to encourage more students to take up nursing courses
    or for immigrants who are RN to try to take up the Competency Assessment Program so that they can practice nursing there.

    They have informed me of the benefits of practicing nursing in New Zealand.
    Kindly check on one of the link for more information: www.immigratenz.co.nz/visa

    I will try to research more on New Zealand.
  5. by   mswhite
    I am 47 years old and just obtained my lpn licensure in almost 2 months ago. I just started a BSN program. at first i was slightly embarrased but noticed a couple of older women in my class. i was embarrased throughout nursing school. i did not even want to attend my graduation. my 26 year old daughter convinced me to do so. she told me that she was proud of me for going through and completing nursing school. she even cried at my graduation. im no longer embarrased. this is the way i look at it: i can becomea nurse at 47, or work at mcdonalds at 47. congrats to all of you who were brave and strong enough to endure nursing school.
  6. by   cskjjk
    I was 41 when I graduated RN school and I have been a nurse now 15 yrs. You can plan on working your butt off in this profession. It is definitely not a glam job. But gives a great deal of inner satisfaction knowing you made a difference in someone's life. Would I go through nursing school hell again if I had it to do over? Yes, I would. Good luck in your new career.
  7. by   mswhite
    I second to that. I just received my LPN license in October at the ripe old age of 47. this month, i started an online program to obtain my BSN.
  8. by   yalienne
    I love this post. I wish my mom could read what you guys have wrote. She is a CNA and living paycheck to paycheck. I am trying to encourage her to become an LPN or RN while I go to school for my BSN-NP. She used to be an HHA then I paid for her to get her CNAfive years ago. NOW I need her to keep going. You guys are great.
  9. by   Noor545
    I always wanted to be a nurse. Started college at 34. Graduated with ADN at 36. Now, I am 63 and have been out of hospital nursing for about 25 years. I've worked clinic jobs through those years while raising two boys we adopted whose mother was a crack addict. Now I want to go back. I took an RN refresher course through the Technical College here, but CANNOT get a job. I am fairly certain it is my age. The other 7 in our group have all been given jobs where they had their 104 hours of Practicum. My preceptor for that said I did a terrific job (and I think I did too) but they won't hire me. I can only assume it might be my age. But I'm 63 - I'M NOT DEAD!!! I want to work so bad. Any ideas out there?
    Noor
  10. by   csason
    I was first licensed when I was 35, now I am 51 and sitting for boards
    again on Saturday morning... I am very excited..

    Wish me luck, pray for me..and rub some sticks together.
  11. by   juggling2much
    I am 43, and starting over after working in retail for many years. I have a bachelor's degree and would recommend that you shop around for schools. I will graduate in May after 3 years (one year of waiting/taking classes). There are programs where you can immerse and complete your nursing degree in 18 months. If I knew then what I know now, I would take that route.
  12. by   AgriWoman
    I will be 44 in Feb. and will be starting classes for my CNA certification. From there I may continue on and go to school for LPN. I have had quite a few careers; most in computer related areas. At the moment I own a small screen printing and run an online mag and forums for rural women. My husband and I are also dairy farmers and I would like to further supplement our (plummeting) income. The economy has hurt my printing biz, not to mention, it's extremely toxic (the chemicals used). I'd like to actually have decent benefits for us and an additional steady income. I chose the nursing field partly because there is no shortage of jobs in our generally rural area and CNA pay is quite good, but also because I care about people and think it's time to give back "while I'm still young I have done some private home care in the past and worked for a CBRF a few years ago and enjoyed helping people. I have a lot of patience (cows and calves demand it!) and love to give so it was only natural to me to go into this field
  13. by   nurse2b2010
    Congrats on beginning your journey! I started back to school when I turned 48 and now just turned 50 and will be starting my second semester of nursing school! It's been hard and challenging but so worth it. You will do well. From one dairy farmer's wife to another -- you go girl!

    Quote from AgriWoman
    I will be 44 in Feb. and will be starting classes for my CNA certification. From there I may continue on and go to school for LPN. I have had quite a few careers; most in computer related areas. At the moment I own a small screen printing and run an online mag and forums for rural women. My husband and I are also dairy farmers and I would like to further supplement our (plummeting) income. The economy has hurt my printing biz, not to mention, it's extremely toxic (the chemicals used). I'd like to actually have decent benefits for us and an additional steady income. I chose the nursing field partly because there is no shortage of jobs in our generally rural area and CNA pay is quite good, but also because I care about people and think it's time to give back "while I'm still young I have done some private home care in the past and worked for a CBRF a few years ago and enjoyed helping people. I have a lot of patience (cows and calves demand it!) and love to give so it was only natural to me to go into this field

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