Anyone start their career late in Life? - page 12

I would be happy to hear from anyone here that started their career late in life, perhaps Nursing is a second career. For a number of reasons, I am seriously considering changing careers, and for a... Read More

  1. by   Human nurse
    Yep, 32 when I dropped out of IT will be 36 when I finally finish. But nursing represented more than just a career change it was a complete paradigm shift in my life. It is hard working and going to school but worth it.
  2. by   Riseupandnurse
    I graduated from nursing school at the age of 39 after a degree in sociology and a first career as a radiologic technologist. It was absolutely the right thing to do. I started out in acute care, and I'm still there prn, on the same floor I joined when I got out of school. But I've had a chance to help with research, and I have taught at the LPN, ADN, and now the BSN level. I LOVE being a university faculty member (after getting my MSN). There is something for everyone in nursing. It has many challenges but many rewards. Nursing made me a different person, and it has enriched my life in so many different ways. Don't let age stop you from following a dream.
  3. by   danu3
    Quote from oldiebutgoodie
    First year of nursing is HARD. I have already switched jobs, after being in a unit where I had 15 different preceptors, absent management, nurses quitting, and a few nursezillas.
    I am sorry... I am still cracking up at the word "nursezillas". I never heard that before. I just have this silly image in my head where godzilla in an early 1900 white nurse uniform with cap coming into a patient room...
  4. by   Aquamarine
    I am happy to think someone 60 is thinking of a career change....I finished at 58 and thought I was the oldest. I can say it has been a challenge....I was anutritionist and loved tgoing to work everyday in an exciting place for over 15 yrs. I felt so good about going to work and what I did. I don't feel that way anymore. Nursing is good, I love to care for the patients...but you don't have that feeling. It is stressful and the place I work...I just don't think the overall feeling is one of respect for nurses. I did more decision making and got more respect as a nutritionist. Maybe it is the differences in the facilities?? Who knows? I do as I am told more now, doctors in the community hospital I work in make the decisions, I made them in the major medical center I worked in...the doctors respected what I had to offer in decision making process for the patients...now it is so different. Maybe in time I will get used to it.
    Nurszilla's... now that is funny..that is another discouraging thing. I think bulldozer when I see some of them coming!! You can imagine what the poor patients think. That nurszilla thing would make a funny comic strip!
    Life is interesting, I could not work a boring job, or one just to put in my hours but I would like respect.....you get it from the patients...not the administration and not the docs sometimes....or your fellow nurses. I am not sure my decision was the right one...I am creative I will find my nitch in nursing.
  5. by   lcbradley
    Quote from Michael076
    Hello,

    I am in a similar position. I am a 29 years old male with a B.S. in Business/Economics. I have been a Financial Advisor and Pharmaceutical Sales representative. It took me years to realize, or I was blinded by $$$$ that I never accepted my complete and utter dissatisfaction for sales. I am not sure why I ever chose the career in the first place.

    I have completed all of my science prereq's, while awaiting acceptance into a nursing school. There is a Hospital program in collaboration with a local community college which starts in january of 06. I am crossing my fingers and praying to be accepted.

    One thing I stopped doing is thinking about the "what if, I did this or that" factor. I understand my business degree will assist me in various nursing pursuits. I feel every experience builds on the next and I know nursing is suitable to my personality profile. Call me an idealist, but I have to do what makes me happy. In all honesty this career change has been really tough thus far. I guess we are all in the same boat.

    Michael I agree. However, my husband thinks differently. You know you are right. If there is something deep down inside telling you to do something I believe you should listen. For a long time I ignored the voices telling me to become a nurse. Then it became so strong I could not go any further until I at least tried. I am 30 years old and I taught school for four years. Some say I'm crazy because I went back to school after earning a BA and a M.Ed., but that is okay because I am extremely happy.
  6. by   JackerooRN
    At the age of 60 my career as a polymer chemist and manager came abruptly to an end as my last employer went belly up four years into my second marriage. My wife's daughter lived in the same town and my wife didn't want us to move several states away where my next job was lined up. She said, "Grab the Sunday want ads and see what's available around here." You guessed it, the paper was full of healthcare jobs. Many many years ago I was a premed student majoring in Physiological Chemistry, but med school didn't work out. Nursing sounded like a natural to me so I completed an ADN course in 2 years, took the licensing tests and finally became a RN. So many opportunites abound for nurses! It's incredibe. It great to feel needed. The only problem will be choosing the fileld right for you. Nursing school was tough for me. It took me longer to learn the material than it for my younger classmates. But I did very well on the exams. All the best to you in your new pursuit!
  7. by   doi
    I am 44 years old and algebra is very difficult for me to grasp. When I attend school years ago, algebra wasn't on the math agenda. It was basic math, easy math, understanding math. Now since I attend college years later agebra is one of the courses neccessary to know or master in order to become a nurse. Not proud to say but this is my third time taking the course. I keep receiving an "making progress" grade. To me this is just a pleasant way of saying I failed. I try so hard but I guess not hard enough. I will not surrender. Of course I will take algebra again but this time I am certain I am going to pass. I desperately want to become a nurse not only for the money and benefits but because I love to help people and want to assist the ill. I was told not to continue, to take another course because this one is not for me. I will not listen to that. I am determined, ambitious, focused and a fighter for what I want and I want and will become a nurse.
  8. by   Selke
    Quote from doi
    I am 44 years old and algebra is very difficult for me to grasp. When I attend school years ago, algebra wasn't on the math agenda. It was basic math, easy math, understanding math. Now since I attend college years later agebra is one of the courses neccessary to know or master in order to become a nurse. Not proud to say but this is my third time taking the course. I keep receiving an "making progress" grade. To me this is just a pleasant way of saying I failed. I try so hard but I guess not hard enough. I will not surrender. Of course I will take algebra again but this time I am certain I am going to pass. I desperately want to become a nurse not only for the money and benefits but because I love to help people and want to assist the ill. I was told not to continue, to take another course because this one is not for me. I will not listen to that. I am determined, ambitious, focused and a fighter for what I want and I want and will become a nurse.
    You inspire me. Thank you for your words. Keep it up. Don't give up. Never give up. You will make it. I need you to make it. I get so discouraged, myself; I need to know that others like yourself, like me, can succeed. You are a great human being! Don't surrender. Algebra can't quantify your heart. Develop your heart, your courage.
  9. by   krisssy
    Quote from doi
    I am 44 years old and algebra is very difficult for me to grasp. When I attend school years ago, algebra wasn't on the math agenda. It was basic math, easy math, understanding math. Now since I attend college years later agebra is one of the courses neccessary to know or master in order to become a nurse. Not proud to say but this is my third time taking the course. I keep receiving an "making progress" grade. To me this is just a pleasant way of saying I failed. I try so hard but I guess not hard enough. I will not surrender. Of course I will take algebra again but this time I am certain I am going to pass. I desperately want to become a nurse not only for the money and benefits but because I love to help people and want to assist the ill. I was told not to continue, to take another course because this one is not for me. I will not listen to that. I am determined, ambitious, focused and a fighter for what I want and I want and will become a nurse.
    Do NOT listen to that person who told you to quit. I took algebra twice. I had a lot of difficulty with chemistry. I had to drop it once and retake it the following semester at night. I did graduate with an RN and a BS. I went on to get an MA plus 24 credits in education. I am now working toward my nurse practitioner degree. As I got older, I did better and better in school. Recently I took a refresher nursing course. I did the entire calculations math workbook by myself. I couldn't believe it. As I got older, I learned that I was a visual learner, and being a visual learner, I had to learn everything visually. Now that I study as a visual learner, I am a great student. That includes math. My grades just kept getting better and better. HS was terrible. College was ok. Grad school was good. Post grad school was all A's. I have a feeling NP school will be all A's. What if I had given up because of Algebra and Chemistry? I was even on academic probation the semester I had to take chemistry, anatomy and physiology and microbiology. I had sooooo much trouble with science and math. You keep studying and keep striving. Never give up-never. Do not ever let anyone talk you into giving up what you want to do. Krisssy RN MA NP 2b I forgot to add-I never took chemistry in HS, and that made it almost impossible in college, but somehow I did it!
    Last edit by krisssy on Dec 16, '05
  10. by   Kim O'Therapy
    I am 39 and start clinical rotations August 2006! My previous full-time employment was administrative and in the computer industry. I stayed home several years after having kids. I decided that if I was going to have to go back to school in order to "catch up" with technology; I might as well go back and do what I really wanted to do - nursing! Good luck.
  11. by   linfull
    I'm 37 and have consider nursing very seriously for the last one to two years. I work at home as a medical transcriptionist (associate in science). I don't have benefits, but I don't have to drive anywhere to work (saves on gas), I'm home with my son (no daycare cost) and I get lots of tax write offs. But I don't make a ton of money. My husband is a tool and die maker...pretty shaky business to be in right now. We just wonder is it worth investing a sizable chunk of change to start all over. I want to work with Hospice which means tons of driving, gas, wear and tear so would I really make that much more in the end?? I don't work weekends or holidays, but trying to save for retirement is tough. Anyone have some sage advice?
    Last edit by linfull on Dec 28, '05
  12. by   danu3
    Quote from linfull
    I want to work with Hospice which means tons of driving, gas, wear and tear so would I really make that much more in the end?? I don't work weekends or holidays, but trying to save for retirement is tough. Anyone have some sage advice?
    Some Hospice do not require tons of driving. Like my local VA has a hospice wing right in the hospital.
  13. by   linfull
    Quote from danu3
    Some Hospice do not require tons of driving. Like my local VA has a hospice wing right in the hospital.
    I live in a rural area and the closest Hospice house is about 45 minutes north. Not a fun drive in the middle of a Michigan winter:wink2: Our Hospice works either nursing home or in the patient's home. We love where we live, so moving really isn't something we would consider unless we absolutely had to. My dad was at a Hospice house in Ohio and it was just wonderful. I always swore if I won the lotto I would figure out how to build/fund a Hospice home for our area. Thanks!

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