Wolford college crna school Information - page 13

by cassius15

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below please find information re: wolford college crna program. good luck in school everyone! hi, i recieved a letter for an interview at wolford. they gave me three dates. i was wondering if anyone who interviewed at... Read More


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    Quote from MeTheRN
    This is a potential conflict of interest, but no one has outright proven that the students' education takes second place to making money for the anesthesia group. I find it fascinating how so many people online think they know the program intimately and know exactly the quantity and quality of cases done by the students. I'm not sure what you consider to be a well rounded clinical education experience, but being trained to full scope of practice and getting experience with blocks, regional, and hundreds of GETA cases seems pretty well rounded to me. As I'm sure you know, you are required by the COA to have a certain number of different cases, such as neurosurgery, pediatrics, trauma, etc. If Wolford were not providing the students with these minimum type of cases, they would not be accredited by the COA. Sure, people allege that the students falsify their cases, but that has yet to be proven. If that is happening, both the student, faculty, or staff involved should be reprimanded. Collier anesthesia has 26 clinical sites. Wolford students go to 5 in the Naples area. There are multiple rooms that never see an SRNA. I'm not trying to be argumentative, but I would like to provide accurate information about the current conditions.

    Your presumption about SACS is not too far off. The school had to decide between building a SIM lab or pursuing SACS. They decided on doing the SIM lab first. In a few weeks, the school will open one of the most advanced SIM labs in the country. And what's even better is the fact that the SIM lab will not be owned and monopolized by a university or a med school, it will belong completely to Wolford. The application to SACS is completed and now it's a waiting game until accreditation.

    I'm not a Wolford "fanboy", I gain absolutely nothing for defending them. I sincerely just want to present both sides of the issue. If the former students can legally prove that they were "employees" of collier anesthesia, they might win the case. If not, the case will be dismissed.
    So, if Wolford is a well rounded program: How many clinical sites are CRNA only or military clinical sites do the students goto? How is program that is owned and operated by an MDA ever going to be truly pro-CRNA independence?, What are the exact numbers that students are getting in different regional techniques, CVLs, SAB, and epidurals (the SRNAs did themselves not with classmates sharing techniques/numbers and not assisting their preceptor....start to finish they did it all themselves)? Are these students being prepared to work anywhere or just for ACT practices like Collier Anesthesia?

    You have to wonder if one of the purposes of building the sim lab at Wolford is to get students their required numbers in regional techniques and CVLs without ever having to do these techniques on a real patient. Sim labs are great, but it only teach you so much.
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    Since I don't regularly perform differential analysis on different anesthesia schools, I cannot assert that Wolford is a well rounded program comparatively. The program meets the minimum requirements of the COA and exceeds the minimum number of cases. I'm not sure why students are "falsifying" their clinical cases when they're averaging around 900-1000 upon graduating. Frankly, until it is proven, I'm going to remain skeptic regardless of what anonymous users on an internet forum reiterate so vehemently.

    To my knowledge, none of the sites are CRNA-only or military. I'm not sure if those sites even exist in FL. If those sites do in fact exist, perhaps other schools have already acquired them as clinical sites. I do know that some graduates have gone on to work on the USA-Mexican border and work independently with only a surgeon in the room. The average PAC placements are 20-25 and CVL are 50-60, but it's up to the student to chase the opportunities and be at the right place at the right time. I'm not adamantly opposed to having an MDA on site though, other than induction and emergence I hardly ever see them unless there's a true emergency. It's personality based though, some MDA's are more standoffish and let you do your work and learn, some won't even let you bag. I know a few CRNAs that are as controlling though, so the MDAs don't get all the criticism in my book. Most of the graduated CRNAs I personally know work in the ACT model. I would rather be trained and learn in a model that will most similarly resemble where I'll be working after graduation. It's great if you're independent and used to working by yourself, but you have to know how to work as part of a team as well.

    Due to the close professional relationships between CRNAs and MDAs, is it so absurd that these doctors co-founded the school with a CRNA to yield great nurse anesthetists to make their job easier? You're right, the MDAs probably aren't pro-CRNA, but I know for sure that they're pro positive patient outcomes and safe/efficient anesthesia delivery. That's good enough for me. I'll support my profession through FANA and AANA, I don't need doctors to help. And for the record, one of our MDAs gave a lecture at the local state nurse anesthesia conference last fall. Either they don't play into the politics of MDAs vs CRNAs, or they're brilliant actors.

    I'm not sure if the SIM lab cases will count towards the cases or not, but I'll find out and get back to you.
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    1. Minimum requirements by the COA are a joke and currently being revised.
    2. There are several military hospitals in Florida and at least one large military hospital in Georgia. There are also CRNA only sites in Florida. There is no excuse for the school not to send students to independent CRNA sites other than not wanting them to learn/work in those environments d/t politics.
    3. A CRNA that trains to work independently can work in any environment, but CRNAs/SRNAs that train in restrictive ACT practices only are going to have a hard time working in any other anesthetic environment.
    4. I am military trained and work in a variety of environments. I work all the time in a team environment, but my anesthetics are not controlled by MDAs. Working in a team is not the same as working in an ACT practice.
    5. There is an obvious conflict of interest when the owner of the school is an MDA. There will be no real efficiency taught at that school. The most efficient and just as equally as safe anesthetic practice is a CRNA only practice.
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    i just accepted the offer letter to start february 2013! they actually were curious if i'd want to start this october but because i've planned too many things this fall i had to wait till february. i live in st. petersburg and will be commuting from the tampa/st. petersburg area. anyone else going to be making this trip? if so e-mail me at roush57@marshall.edu and hopefully we can attempt to car pool.
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    Those sites in Davenport, Tampa… they are all connected directly TO Wolford. There are ROTATIONS in West Palm Beach and Sarasota and Tipton.
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    Quote from wtbcrna
    1. Minimum requirements by the COA are a joke and currently being revised.
    2. There are several military hospitals in Florida and at least one large military hospital in Georgia. There are also CRNA only sites in Florida. There is no excuse for the school not to send students to independent CRNA sites other than not wanting them to learn/work in those environments d/t politics.
    3. A CRNA that trains to work independently can work in any environment, but CRNAs/SRNAs that train in restrictive ACT practices only are going to have a hard time working in any other anesthetic environment.
    4. I am military trained and work in a variety of environments. I work all the time in a team environment, but my anesthetics are not controlled by MDAs. Working in a team is not the same as working in an ACT practice.
    5. There is an obvious conflict of interest when the owner of the school is an MDA. There will be no real efficiency taught at that school. The most efficient and just as equally as safe anesthetic practice is a CRNA only practice.
    I just wanted to let you know Wolford now has a CRNA only practice clinical site in Marianna Florida. I haven't rotated there yet but I've put in my request to go. It'll be interesting to compare the two practice models.
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    [COLOR=#444444]This would eliminate Wolford College unless they obtained regional accreditation. Presumably, Wolford would be allowed to continue through till their next accreditation. [/COLOR]

    This is one of the new requirements by the COA.

    •The COA approved the requirement for the degree granting institutions of nurse anesthesia programs to have regional accreditation. The COA determined this requirement will be reflected in its Eligibility for Accreditation policy rather than within the Standards. [/COLOR]

    The standards are found here.
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    I'm very new to this site and hope I can receive PMs (Havent yet posted enough to enable sending them) - but I am applying for Wolford's Fall 2014 start date and have a few acquaintances who have applied for earlier start dates or are currently enrolled. I was wondering if anyone is willing to contact me so I could ask you a few questions about the program/your experience with applying there. Please feel free to email me at jcumerma@hotmail.com if you can help. Thank you!!


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