Under 1 year ICU experience ???

  1. 0
    Hey guys, had 2 quick questions.

    Background: New grad nurse with chiropractic degree (3.98 GPA) and BSN in December (4.0GPA).

    1. The hospital here (level 2 trauma center) is hiring new graduates in the Emergency Dept. Does it absolutely have to be a level 1 center to be apply to the schools that do allow ER experience?

    2. For the schools that only want ICU experience. Hypothetically, if you had 6 months in the ER and 9 months in ICU, would that count as acceptable experience since overall its over a year or would they just throw out that application?

    Thanks!
  2. 9 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    You would be well served to obtain 2-3 years of critical care experience.

    Your answer to number two would be no. IF they only want ICU experience you will need 12 months in the ICU at a minimum.
  4. 0
    I agree with the post above. You really need to be comfortable in an ICU setting before attempting a rigorous anesthesia program. You have to be autonomous and know how to make decisions under pressure. You also have to take into consideration the multiple drugs, IV lines, sedation techniques and technical equipment that you will need to feel comfortable with. It's about building leadership because CRNAs are just that...leaders. I've noticed that a lot of people play down then importance of getting a solid ICU background. It is just as important as grades, GRE score, etc. You also can't count orientation time in the ICU as experience time because you are learning under a preceptor. Most ICUs give between 6-12 weeks of orientation. So just be patient and learn all that you can. It will benefit you in your future endeavors.
  5. 0
    All the schools I see say that you just have to be employed at an ICU when you apply. Since you apply 1.5-2 years in advance, they say the required experience (1-2 years) will be completed by the time you actually start CRNA school. Some schools do take ER experience from a Level 1 Trauma center, but you have to check the schools in your area to see what they say.

    I mean if you can't get that ICU job right now, why not take an ER job? Would you rather not work at all if you can't do ICU right now? CRNA is my goal as well, but I will be damned if I turn down a job when so many can't even find one right now. I will reach my goal, maybe just not RIGHT after I graduate.
  6. 0
    good points above-
    also-

    where I interviewed they ranked each applicant according to a point system. year's of nursing experience also gave more and more points. just food for thought.
  7. 0
    If you are set on going to anesthesia school, going straight into the ICU is your best option. If you work in the ER you are limiting your school options. As far as experience goes, there are a lot of people that say one year is not enough. I am finishing my first semester of anesthesia school now and was only out of school for 14 months when I started the program. Some people seem to grasp things easier because of their experience, but I find it beneficial that I never got out of the studying mindset and remember a lot of things from school. So far, all A's in the program, which is more than I could say about nursing school.
  8. 0
    Now many programs are moving to more ICU experience as a requirement (my program recently changed the requirement to two years minimum instead of one for admission)...if you're a new grad and just going right into ICU, I do highly recommend at least two years...the first year of practice is just to get familiar with your surroundings and your feet wet, while the second year enables you to start feeling more confident in your practice, which is absolutely necessary for anesthesia school in my opinion. Several of my classmates with less than two years of experience were struggling with basic nursing skills that need to be proficient by the time you start doing anything anesthesia-related.
  9. 0
    Well, just looking at options now as I'm a bit older since I've been a chiropractor first. It looks like my local hospital is hiring in ER and CCU... however, if we move a few hours away, i can get into ICU at a level 1 trauma center rather easily. So, there in lies my dilemma as we have a chiro practice (that my husband runs) locally.

    Is CCU > ER as far as experience goes?

    SuperNurse123, great job and thats good to know! What school are you at? How do you like it so far?


    krisjazzer13, same quesiton... what school are you at.. and do you like it?

    Thanks for all the help!
  10. 0
    Quote from pamchris
    Well, just looking at options now as I'm a bit older since I've been a chiropractor first. It looks like my local hospital is hiring in ER and CCU... however, if we move a few hours away, i can get into ICU at a level 1 trauma center rather easily. So, there in lies my dilemma as we have a chiro practice (that my husband runs) locally.

    Is CCU > ER as far as experience goes?

    SuperNurse123, great job and thats good to know! What school are you at? How do you like it so far?

    krisjazzer13, same quesiton... what school are you at.. and do you like it?

    Thanks for all the help!
    If CCU is some kind of an ICU, then is definitely better than ER. Wih ER experience, you will be linited on school choices.
  11. 0
    I would apply to the ICU a few hours away and move if hired.


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