Should I apply?

  1. Greetings,

    I was looking for some advice as far as applying to CRNA school. I graduated from nursing school in May with a GPA of 3.8. I have worked in a busy CVICU unit since graduation and I feel like I have learned A TON. I recently took the GRE and made a 1240.

    I realize that I am way light on experience and that this is probably the most important component of the application process, but by the time school starts I will have 18 months of experience.

    The deadline is December 1st.

    Also, is 1240 a good score on the GRE or should I retake it?
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   CaslaRN
    Go for it!
  4. by   shandsburnRN-CRNA
    Your GPA is excellent, your GRE is good. Yes just about every program wants a year experience some two. You'll have that prior to the program starting so that decision is up to the admission committee. Do you have any other certs, i.e. ACLS, PALS, CPR, CCRN, etc?

    If you meet all the requirements other than being a little short on time I would go ahead and apply. If nothing else you'll have an interview or two behind you for experience.

    As for the GRE score, it's up to you and which schools you are looking at 1240 is really pretty good though. Most schools, I think, look at the whole package more than just one test score, though 1000 is the minimum alot will accept.
  5. by   gasmaster
    Most programs require that you have 1 full year of ICU experience before you apply. Many also require the CCRN. Sounds like u r on the right track, but don't have enough ICU hours to make the cut this year. Hang in there and rack up those hours!
  6. by   jemommyRN
    YOU SHOULD APPLY! LOL. It does not matter how many months you have when you apply, as long as you meet the requirements before entry into the program, in which you will. You should apply and be confident that you will get in. If you are ready, do it!
  7. by   smileyRn96
    Apply, all the schools I looked at want 12 months ICU experience before you START, not apply. Anyone who tells you otherwise is worried you will take their spot:trout:, because your stats are better then most, except the experience part. CCRN will help over come that fact.
    -Smiley
  8. by   Frigle
    Go for it. You have everything you need. If you don't have ACLS, PALS, BLS you can get that before classes start. You probably won't need CCRN with the rest of your stats. Like I said. Go for it!
  9. by   gasmaster
    Sorry, but I think u guys are kinda' jumping the gun here. CRNA builds off being an expert ICU nurse. With only a handful of months experience you are still in the novice phase. Remember, you have to walk before you can run. All the stats on you both are impressive and will benefit you when you're ready.....besides, as stated before, most programs require that you have a minimum of 1 year in ICU (and they don't count residency time either into that equation) before they will even look at your application. So if either of you guys have been in a residency program, you will need to add an additional 12 months to that before you qualify.
  10. by   gasmaster
    Quote from jemommy
    YOU SHOULD APPLY! LOL. It does not matter how many months you have when you apply, as long as you meet the requirements before entry into the program, in which you will. You should apply and be confident that you will get in. If you are ready, do it!
    That's not what the programs I applied for demanded for qualifications! You had to have all the required experience PRIOR to applying!
  11. by   gasmaster
    Quote from MSU_nurse07
    That isn't the requirement for the programs I plan to apply for.
    One of the programs I applied to had changed their requirements in the past to "must have 1 year ICU prior to starting the program." They quickly changed it back to "must have 1 year prior to applying" when they realized they were getting nurses into the program that didn't have a really sound critical care foundation to build off of (that's what they told me anyway). I know you have excellent credentials, but it all boils down to experience. There is just no way (my feelings anyway) that with only 5 months ICU behind you that you can be considered anything but a novice nurse. Are you in a residency or just hired straight into a unit? Have you talked with your preceptors about your plans to get their feedback as to how you are progressing?

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