RRNA or SRNA for title, What is your opinion? - page 5

I have seen RRNA and SRNA quite often here and just wondered what you all thought of the 2 titles. I like RRNA myself. They way they explained it to us at TCU is that it can ease some pt anxiety... Read More

  1. by   apaisRN
    Wow, ether, that's a nasty TV show. I don't watch TV (well, once in a blue moon) and I miss this kind of cultural reference, and that patients are remembering scenes like that when I deal with them.

    Obnoxious as it is, at least the last scene shows a nurse concerned about the patient and willing to challenge a physician over it. Unfortunately the scene makes it sound like the nurse is a PITA for doing it, not a professional advocating for her patient.
  2. by   DreamMatrix
    Quote from apaisRN
    Wow, ether, that's a nasty TV show. I don't watch TV (well, once in a blue moon) and I miss this kind of cultural reference, and that patients are remembering scenes like that when I deal with them.

    Obnoxious as it is, at least the last scene shows a nurse concerned about the patient and willing to challenge a physician over it. Unfortunately the scene makes it sound like the nurse is a PITA for doing it, not a professional advocating for her patient.
    Actually, in opinion polls conducted, the nursing profession and nurses are the most trusted of all...including docs! So I think the public sees these programs for what they are, fiction....
  3. by   Kiwi
    Quote from apaisRN
    Wow, ether, that's a nasty TV show.
    Some of the material from that website is scary.
  4. by   NeuroNP
    One of my points in brining up the whole MD vs DO issue (and I didn't properly articulate this) was that when DOs came along, they were an "alternative" to alopathic medicine. I'm sure that they dealt with the whole "wannabe" thing. My parents told me that DOs were often seen as not as good as MDs and it seems as though they were viewed in a way similar to how MDs view ANPs now.

    I had an MDA tell me that DOs were just as good as MDs, not just in primary care, but as Anesthesiologists. He told me that he knew some DO studnets who he hoped would be anesthesia residents in his program when they graduated. He even suggested that if I wanted to go into Anesthesia (I told him I wanted to be a CRNA) and if I was worried about getting into med school, (I choose CRNA for different reasons btw) to go for a DO.

    Now, if docs (and I realize that I'm generalizing based on one) accept that DO school is "easier to get into" than MD school, but still put DOs on a level plain with MDs and above CRNAs, what are the DOs doing to get that respect that maybe APNs need to do? What can we learn from DOs?

    The analogies to all the other Allied Heath Doctors (DC, PharmD, etc) are good, but if we want to do the same job as MDs and get the same respect, maybe we should ananlyze how one group (DOs) already did it?

    Just my $0.02
  5. by   deepz
    Quote from bryanboling5
    ....when DOs came along, they were an "alternative" to alopathic medicine. .....

    Bryan my friend, please don't take this the wrong way, as I do tend to be overly blunt, but it seems as if you burn up an *awful* lot of energy speculating, speculations on this and on that, energy that could more profitably be invested in your work or in doing your own research. Here's a piece of easily available research on the history of DOs:

    http://www.aacom.org/om/history.html

    Just do it, as the slogan goes.

    deepz
  6. by   athomas91
    anesres-
    "misleading" implies no deception - whether you infer it or not is your choice - misleading is just what it states -
    a student is understood to be "new" to an experience, or without experience - i dare say that most SRNA's have more clinical experience (with patients, IV's, drips, drugs and disease processes) than any resident around. - and i emphasize the word "most"
    anesthesia "residents" and "student" nurse anesthetists alike are students of anesthesia - why should one or the other monopolize a title if it is truly not that meaningful??
    as for explaining to patients - if you thoroughly read the previous posts - it is very clear that my program utilizes the word student - and when the opportunity arises I accomplish all the teaching that I can possibly fit into a pre-op time period - starting off with Nurse Anesthetists being the forefounders of anesthesia as well as the fact that the majority of anesthesia is actually provided by them.
  7. by   dneill01
    Wow, this is getting nowhere. I am an RRNA/SRNA. I dont care what the hell they call me. I look at the patient introduction as an opportunity to educate my patients that more anesthesia is provided by CRNAs than MDAs and AAs combined. I introduce myself as a Resident Registered Nurse Anesthetist then I joke and say "now that that is out of the way, I have been a critical care RN for 11 years and am now in graduate training in anesthesia. I am yet to have one patient "freak out". It is all in presentation and professional approach. Emphasis on "working with....... "
    Now for my pet peeve.......comparing a NP to a CRNA and their education is rediculous. I could have become a NP going to evening classes 2-3 nights a week for 18 months! More graduate nursing classes?? Not a chance we are all aware of the importance of nursing theory. I am in 30 months of fulltime+ anesthesia school, residency whatever you like to call it.
    In ending the emphasis should be placed on Nurse. Anesthesia residents deserve the respect of being MD's but they are anesthesia students just as SRNA does for being a RN.
  8. by   CRNA70
    In the facility where I work, we share a CRNA program with a medical doctor anesthesiology program. We are prohibited from calling SRNAs residents (even in the residency portion of their training) because this was deemed confusing to patients. We refer to nurse anesthesia trainees as SRNAs.
    Remember that a patient has a right to know who you are (and you are a student or a trainee, if you like). I also introduce my students as "nurses training in our nurse anesthesia program". This conveys (sometimes, depending on the patient) that the person is indeed a registered nurse with an earned degree (and not a student nurse). Hope that helps.
  9. by   Lucy54
    Just a little funny story pertaining to titles. I graduated from nursing school and immediately started a preceptorship in the ER while awaiting my NCLEX results. My badge read NGRNP (new graduate registered nurse practicing) I coulnd't believe they put that on my badge. Every time someone would ask me what it stood for, the nurses would say, "new girl, really needs practice"!!

    Oh well, I've recovered, and now I'm back in school with another student title. Just for the record, I'd rather be known as a Nurse Anesthesia Resident, but my school uses SRNA.
  10. by   NOLA-ROB
    resident, holder of a medical residency, a physician or other medical professional in a united states hospital, who after completing a specified level of schooling and an internship receives specialized clinical training. residency is a stage of postgraduate medical training in north america and leads to eligibility for board certification in a primary care or referral specialty. whereas medical school (nursing school) gives doctors (nurses) a broad range of medical (nursing) knowledge, basic clinical skills, and limited experience practicing medicine (nursing), medical (advanced nursing) residency gives in-depth training within a specific branch of medicine (advance practice nursing), such as anesthesiology.

    residencies are traditionally hospital-based and in the middle of the twentieth century, residents would often live in hospital-supplied housing. "call" (night duty in the hospital) was sometimes as frequent as every second or third night for up to three years. pay was minimal beyond room, board, and laundry services. it was assumed that most young men and women training as physicians had few obligations outside of medical training at that stage of their careers.

    taken from wikipedia encyclopedia. updates added.

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