RRNA or SRNA for title, What is your opinion? - page 2

I have seen RRNA and SRNA quite often here and just wondered what you all thought of the 2 titles. I like RRNA myself. They way they explained it to us at TCU is that it can ease some pt anxiety... Read More

  1. by   SigmaSRNA
    Quote from jwk
    AA student or anesthesiologist assistant student.
    I don't believe any other graduate program in nursing at the master's level calls there students residents. On the other hand, no other nursing specialty does as much call or clinical work as nurse anesthesia residents. At my program, (texas wesleyan university) we use the term resident registered nurse anesthetist. Resident does sound better than student and during our clinical years we spend alot of time (overnights) in the hospital. There it is.
  2. by   zoozoo
    I like "resident" much more than a "student". There is a confidance behind "resident". Imagine if you are scheduled to have a surgery and you have a "student" who is going to provide anesthesia for you! I would personally refused to have a student by my side in that particular day.
  3. by   jwk
    Quote from SigmaSRNA
    I don't believe any other graduate program in nursing at the master's level calls there students residents.......There it is.
    Yep, there it is - I rest my case.
  4. by   New CCU RN
    Why can't you just say I am a nurse in a graduate anesthesia program who is part of the anesthesia team? No where does that say I am a 20 year old student. And if the patients are curious - it opens them up to ask about nurse anesthesia.

    I do think saying resident does in some way imply doctor to unknowing patients. I know that our chaplains call their clinical training time residencies, as do our pharmacists. (But I believe the pharmacists are already graduated from their master's programs and it is an elective residency.) However, I have never heard them say I am a chaplain resident - they call themselves part of the team of chaplains.

    I think that the majority of patients do not care who does the anesthesia as long as they wake up comfortable - and unless they ask - I don't think we need to bombard them with terms that they probably don't care to know about in the preop holding area. So - to conclude - a part of the anesthesia team - to me is sufficient......
  5. by   lmdscd
    Quote the whole paragraph to show what they really were saying .To me it dont change the facts of ,who we are . But to ease people minds or for a more direct label, So you dont have to explain all the time should not be a problem. my 2 cents
    Last edit by Kiwi on Sep 23, '05
  6. by   TCU RRNA
    My name tag from TCU has the following info on it:

    student name RRNA
    Texas Christian University
    SCHOOL OF NURSE ANESTHESIA


    As long as an individual can read then it would be hard to mistake that name tag as one belonging to a doctor.

    jwk- Two questions I have for you are regarding your anesthesia training: How long is the program and what does it entail? And one specifically for the practice of AA: how many states recognize anesthesia assistants and allow them to practice as anesthesia providers?
    Last edit by canoehead on Sep 23, '05 : Reason: personal attack
  7. by   TexasCCRN
    Quote from New CCU RN
    Why can't you just say I am a nurse in a graduate anesthesia program who is part of the anesthesia team? No where does that say I am a 20 year old student. And if the patients are curious - it opens them up to ask about nurse anesthesia.

    I do think saying resident does in some way imply doctor to unknowing patients. I know that our chaplains call their clinical training time residencies, as do our pharmacists. (But I believe the pharmacists are already graduated from their master's programs and it is an elective residency.) However, I have never heard them say I am a chaplain resident - they call themselves part of the team of chaplains.

    I think that the majority of patients do not care who does the anesthesia as long as they wake up comfortable - and unless they ask - I don't think we need to bombard them with terms that they probably don't care to know about in the preop holding area. So - to conclude - a part of the anesthesia team - to me is sufficient......
    I do like the comment about being a member of the anesthesia team. However we do need to continue to educate patients that not only doctors do a residency. These are the battles that we need to fight every day if we want to keep our independent practice. We need to educate the public.
  8. by   TexasCCRN
    Quote from TCU RRNA
    My name tag from TCU has the following info on it:

    student name RRNA
    Texas Christian University
    SCHOOL OF NURSE ANESTHESIA


    As long as an individual can read then it would be hard to mistake that name tag as one belonging to a doctor.

    jwk- Two questions I have for you are regarding your anesthesia training: How long is the program and what does it entail? And one specifically for the practice of AA: how many states recognize anesthesia assistants and allow them to practice as anesthesia providers?
    TCU I agree with what you are saying but don't even dignify jwk by giving into what he wants...which is to cause trouble. I have read many of his posts and I think rarely does he contribute in a positive manner to the practice of anesthesia (no matter who is delivering it). Think about it this way. If you were in his shoes wouldn't you be just as defensive. No explanation needed why.
    Last edit by canoehead on Sep 23, '05 : Reason: quoted personal attack
  9. by   Kiwi
    I deleted jwk's offending message which appeared throughout the thread.

    Nurse anesthesia students feels strongly about this, and you know it, JWK! That is so stereotypical and UNFAIR to play the ol' "wannabe doctor" card. The members who are posting to this thread are particularly proud to be nurses, and it is apparant in their posts. These are not nurse anesthesia students who are going to tell people they are residents in order to get jollies in deceiving pts and go on a power trip. The arguement is valid in this thread. I draw the line when members start instigating arguments and say, "let the flames begin".

    While many, many members value your input and view as an AA, this is a nurse anesthesia board. We will be steadfast in advocating for it.
    Last edit by Kiwi on Sep 23, '05
  10. by   TCU RRNA
    Quote from ether
    I deleted jwk's offending message which appeared throughout the thread.

    Nurse anesthesia students feels strongly about this, and you know it, JWK! That is so stereotypical and UNFAIR to play the ol' "wannabe doctor" card. The members who are posting to this thread are particularly proud to be nurses, and it is apparant in their posts. These are not nurse anesthesia students who are going to tell people they are residents in order to get jollies in deceiving pts and go on a power trip. The arguement is valid in this thread. I draw the line when members start instigating arguments and say, "let the flames begin".

    While many, many members value your input and view as an AA, this is a nurse anesthesia board. We will be steadfast in advocating for it.

    Thank you Ether
  11. by   sproutsfriend
    The term resident was started back when young M.D.s actually lived in the hospitals (their residence) during their internships.
  12. by   TexasCCRN
    Quote from ether
    I deleted jwk's offending message which appeared throughout the thread.

    Nurse anesthesia students feels strongly about this, and you know it, JWK! That is so stereotypical and UNFAIR to play the ol' "wannabe doctor" card. The members who are posting to this thread are particularly proud to be nurses, and it is apparant in their posts. These are not nurse anesthesia students who are going to tell people they are residents in order to get jollies in deceiving pts and go on a power trip. The arguement is valid in this thread. I draw the line when members start instigating arguments and say, "let the flames begin".

    While many, many members value your input and view as an AA, this is a nurse anesthesia board. We will be steadfast in advocating for it.
    Thanks Ether! I did not intend the thread to start anything except a discussion on what title was most preferred/appropriate and would be best for the profession. For the most part this jwk person just posts antagonistic remarks. Again, good job!
  13. by   Kiwi
    TexasCCRN, this is a valid thread. I'm sorry it got sort of butchered. I wonder if AANA will ever have a standard title for students.

    By the way, I hope you're safe down there. Our prayers are with you this weekend!

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