RN to CRNA - which road? - pg.3 | allnurses

RN to CRNA - which road? - page 3

Hello, all! I am new to this forum, new to nursing in general, and still trying to figure out where to post, so bear with me if you see duplicates. This site has been a tremendous tool in garnering... Read More

  1. Visit  IndiCRNA profile page
    2
    Quote from suppaduppaCNA
    Thanks for your input missnurse. May I ask you why do you prefer the brick and mortar system?
    My experience is that getting into CRNA school isn't hard. I have never known anyone who didn't get in. I know a few who had to apply two years in a row to get accepted.
    I got my BSN from an online school (WGU). I had classmates who got theirs from U of P and other online schools.
    Get good grades, get a job in a high level ICU, SICU and / or CVICU is best but others are OK too. Do a good job (so you can get great reference letters), learn a lot, get your CCRN, get a bachelors degree and apply. If you don't get accepted take 6-9 credits of graduate classes as a non degree seeking student (I did this, side benifit of reducing my work load during the didactic year) and re-apply. I have never even heard of anyone who did those things who didn't get accepted. Well when I was in school we did hear of qualified nurses who didn't make it in cause they blew the interview. The usual reason was they came in acting like Gods' gift to nursing and anesthesia. (huge ego).
    I was accepted to 3 of the 4 school I applied to the first time I applied. My grades were good, but not perfect. If I remeber right I had a 3.66 combined nursing school and BSN program and the BSN portion was strait 3.0 (highest GPA possible with WGU).
    When I did have was 5 years of very high qualiety experience.
    besaangel and TheBlackDogWaits like this.
  2. Visit  missnurse01 profile page
    1
    Quote from suppaduppaCNA
    Thanks for your input missnurse. May I ask you why do you prefer the brick and mortar system?
    No I went to an online program for rn-bsn. But it was housed in a college that had a brick and mortar BSN program. Therefore there was infrastructure there, from instructors to everything else. Also I choose a school that had been doing distance learning for a long time, as that state has a spread out population. It was just my choice.
    sweetie015 likes this.
  3. Visit  TheBlackDogWaits profile page
    0
    Quote from IndiCRNA
    My experience is that getting into CRNA school isn't hard. I have never known anyone who didn't get in. I know a few who had to apply two years in a row to get accepted. I got my BSN from an online school (WGU). I had classmates who got theirs from U of P and other online schools. Get good grades, get a job in a high level ICU, SICU and / or CVICU is best but others are OK too. Do a good job (so you can get great reference letters), learn a lot, get your CCRN, get a bachelors degree and apply. If you don't get accepted take 6-9 credits of graduate classes as a non degree seeking student (I did this, side benifit of reducing my work load during the didactic year) and re-apply. I have never even heard of anyone who did those things who didn't get accepted. Well when I was in school we did hear of qualified nurses who didn't make it in cause they blew the interview. The usual reason was they came in acting like Gods' gift to nursing and anesthesia. (huge ego). I was accepted to 3 of the 4 school I applied to the first time I applied. My grades were good, but not perfect. If I remeber right I had a 3.66 combined nursing school and BSN program and the BSN portion was strait 3.0 (highest GPA possible with WGU). When I did have was 5 years of very high qualiety experience.
    I love to see responses like this, too. So many times, I hear about how or why so-and-so is incredibly difficult, when all along the only requirement is applying yourself and doing the leg work, which in and of itself is not difficult at all; I'm sure if you have time constraints and multiple commitments you will be spread thin, but those are usually the people making all the woeful generalizations. Granted, I'm certain that if I had 5 kids, my perspective would change. However, it's just as nice to hear about the success of someone who manages time well and moves through the process appropriately, instead of the constant stream from those who just don't have any more time to manage. Thank you for your feedback here. My respects to all of you that have done well balancing family life and school; I don't know that I could be so diligent.
    Last edit by TheBlackDogWaits on Jan 23, '13
  4. Visit  missnurse01 profile page
    1
    I think what you end up hearing is comments to the posters who do not want to do any of the leg work to get into school. they want to know which schools do not require GRE , and the easiest schools to get into - with both low GPA and minimal experience . they also do not have any intentions of taking more sciences, grad level or not. it is those posters who wear on everyone's nerves and lead people to give short clipped Answers. because these are not to people that we want in anesthesia. we want the ones that will do anything and that will constantly strive for their profession and continually seek out educational advancement .

    it's not that it's hardto get in, it's that it takes a lot of work sometimes.

    If it were impossible no one would get in to quality programs.

    Good luck
    suppaduppaCNA likes this.
  5. Visit  tryingtopass profile page
    0
    Do most programs require a BSN or do others may exceptions?
  6. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    Quote from tryingtopass
    Do most programs require a BSN or do others may exceptions?
    *** All school accept a BSN. The only ones that require it are the schools based in university schools of nursing (a minority). All require a bachelors degree in something. I have knows nurses to get accepted to CRNA school with degrees in forestry, music, english, dairy science and the basic sciences like chem.
  7. Visit  ruler of kolob profile page
    0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    Just FYI you can't be qualifed to apply to any CRNA school with a masters degree unless you also have a bachelors degree. For example a nurse who does and ADN to MSN program would not be elligable to apply to CRNA school. All CRNA schools must require a bachelors degree.
    That said I have known people to go to CRNA school with bachelors degrees in forestry, dairy science, all the hard sciences, music and english.
    My other avice is to keep your plan to go to anesthesia school a secret. ICU nurse managers hate losing RNs just at the point they are starting to become useful to the unit. I have known more than one ICU nurse manager go so far as to call your nursing school instructors and ask if a potential hire ever talked about going to CRNA school.
    I had no idea if you had an MSN from an ADN you could not get into CRNA school... Where did you get this information?
  8. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    Quote from ruler of kolob
    I had no idea if you had an MSN from an ADN you could not get into CRNA school... Where did you get this information?
    *** I don't remember where I got the information. Seems like I have always known that. However it can be found on the AANA's web site here:
    Become a CRNA

    "Requirements

    The requirements for becoming a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA) mainly include having a bachelor's degree in nursing (or other appropriate baccalaureate degree), Registered Nurse licensure, a minimum of one year acute care experience (for example, ICU or ER), and the successful completion of both an accredited nurse anesthesia educational program and the national certification examination. For more information about the nurse anesthesia profession and its requirements, please read the documents information below.
  9. Visit  wtbcrna profile page
    0
    I emailed the COA and yes a direct MSN would meet the admission requirement for having a bachelors degree.
  10. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    Quote from wtbcrna
    I emailed the COA and yes a direct MSN would meet the admission requirement for having a bachelors degree.
    Great! Thanks for finding that out. Interesting that the AANA's own website is putting out inaccurate information.
  11. Visit  ruler of kolob profile page
    0
    It's kind of obvious if you have a MASTERS in nursing..... that obviates the need for a BACHELORS in nursing.

    PMFB did your CRNA school only accept BSN's?
  12. Visit  wtbcrna profile page
    0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    Great! Thanks for finding that out. Interesting that the AANA's own website is putting out inaccurate information.
    It isn't really misinformation. Those criteria come straight from the COA, but the COA doesn't clarify that particular rule. Login (members only access) Here is all information accreditation from the COA.
  13. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    Quote from ruler of kolob
    It's kind of obvious if you have a MASTERS in nursing..... that obviates the need for a BACHELORS in nursing.

    PMFB did your CRNA school only accept BSN's?
    *** I am not a CRNA. However I have helped dozens of my ICU nurse freinds get accepted to CRNA school and nearly all my old ICU friends are CRNAs now. As my units nurse education cordinator I also worked with two differnt CRNA schools whose students do clinicals in our hospital.
    Of the 5 area CRNA (I use "area" very loosly as we are very rural) schools only one is based in a university school of nursing and requires a BSN. I know they do not accept applications from nurses without BSNs. I speak witht he cordinator of this program regularly and they do require a BSN. A MSN without a previous BSN would not be elligabel to apply. I never had reason to ask any of the others. The others consider nurses with a variety of bachelors degrees. As I have mentioned previously I have seen nurses with bachelors degrees in things like forestry, music, english, dairy science, and others get accepted to CRNA school. When looking at various CRNA school's websites they all list a bachelors degree as a requirment.
    One local school in particular, based in a university without a nursing program, seems to be willing to accept just about any bachelors degree. Their CRNA grads actually graduate with a MS in biology.


Visit Our Sponsors
Top
close
close