Questions about CRNA programs

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    Hi, I just posted some questions about CRNA programs a couple day ago on this forum and got the best information yet!! (TraumaNurse's response was great) I am so excited I found this place

    I still have a few questions for any of you experienced people--

    1. What is the difference between a front loaded CRNA program and integrated program?
    2. What are the pros/cons or differences between a university based program and a hospital/anesthesia school with a university affiliate?
    3. Is a MSN more prestigious than having a masters in another field w/a major in anesthesia?
    4. If you take the GRE and do bad for whatever reason, and try applying to a CRNA program that does not require the GRE do you still have to show them your scores, or will they have access to them?

    Thanks
  2. 12 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    Quote from Shayna24
    Hi, I just posted some questions about CRNA programs a couple day ago on this forum and got the best information yet!! (TraumaNurse's response was great) I am so excited I found this place

    I still have a few questions for any of you experienced people--

    1. What is the difference between a front loaded CRNA program and integrated program?
    2. What are the pros/cons or differences between a university based program and a hospital/anesthesia school with a university affiliate?
    3. Is a MSN more prestigious than having a masters in another field w/a major in anesthesia?
    4. If you take the GRE and do bad for whatever reason, and try applying to a CRNA program that does not require the GRE do you still have to show them your scores, or will they have access to them?

    Thanks
    A front loaded program does the majority of the academic phase in the beginning of the program. For example, I attend a front loaded program. We had 12months of didactic and started inthe OR this last summer. We still have classes, butr we are almost done with academics. Integrated programs have classes and clinical together almost from the beginning. For example, I havre a friend in school in Michigan. He started in the OR 6 months prior to me, butr he is going to be doing academics throughout his program. The differences both have their advantages and disadvantages. You have to decide what ois best for you. Pros and Cons of hospital based vs. University based....that is a tough one. Most of these programs are university affiliated, but some of that is the degree only. All CRNA programs are master's programs and these degrees are offered by academic institutions, not hospitals. As for the pros and cons of an MSN vs another MA degree....I havce never had anyone ever get more recognition because they had this degree vs. that degree. Everyone who graduates from CRNA school is a CRNA...no one really cares about youjr degree that much. All practice anesthesia in similar and qualified ways. Reasons for getting an MSN vs not, now there is something to worry about. I am working on my MSN because its important to me to have a Master's degree in nursing. I am considering teaching nursing someday (when I'm to old for anesthesia!) and I would like to have an MSN to use towaqrda PHD. My friend wanted nothing to do with nursing BS and he is avoiding all the n ursing classes by getting a master's of science in biolgoy with anesthesia somewhere in there or something like that. It's all the focus you take. Once you submit your GRE scores they ar a part of your permenant record. I retook mine...I still got in. ANd I got into 5 schools and turned down 3 interviews.
  4. 0
    Quote from sonessrna
    I am working on my MSN because its important to me to have a Master's degree in nursing. I am considering teaching nursing someday (when I'm to old for anesthesia!) and I would like to have an MSN to use towaqrda PHD.
    I know it is off the topic, but I just have to respond to sonessrna.

    You most certainly don't have to leave anesthesia to teach. Aren't most of your (classroom) instructors CRNAs? We have an incredible faculty shortage in nurse anesthesia. I am always very glad to hear SRNA/CRNAs express an interest in teaching, we need you!

    Maybe you were thinking of this already, and just meant leaving clinical, not leaving anesthesia. But I have spoken with people before who were considering teaching in the future, and for some reason they often are just thinking about undergrad nursing programs.

    As a CRNA you will be qualified to teach in many nurse anesthesia graduate programs. I agree that a MSN has some advantages if you are considering this route. If you have a non-nursing masters, you will be limited to teaching in non-masters programs.

    I also agree about a doctorate. We do have some non-doctorate faculty now, but very soon a doctorate will be required most everywhere.

    loisane crna
  5. 0
    Thanks for the information
  6. 0
    Regarding the GRE: You do not report your score to schools that don't require it, so the low score scenario will not affect your admission at those schools. It is part of your permanent record but you control who can access those scores.
  7. 0
    Quote from loisane
    I know it is off the topic, but I just have to respond to sonessrna.

    You most certainly don't have to leave anesthesia to teach. Aren't most of your (classroom) instructors CRNAs? We have an incredible faculty shortage in nurse anesthesia. I am always very glad to hear SRNA/CRNAs express an interest in teaching, we need you!

    Maybe you were thinking of this already, and just meant leaving clinical, not leaving anesthesia. But I have spoken with people before who were considering teaching in the future, and for some reason they often are just thinking about undergrad nursing programs.

    As a CRNA you will be qualified to teach in many nurse anesthesia graduate programs. I agree that a MSN has some advantages if you are considering this route. If you have a non-nursing masters, you will be limited to teaching in non-masters programs.

    I also agree about a doctorate. We do have some non-doctorate faculty now, but very soon a doctorate will be required most everywhere.


    loisane crna
    I was kind of thinking of the undergrad nursing programs....but I want to keep all options open. What type of PhD would you recommend for someone who might consider teaching at a CRNA school? I see VCU has a PhD specificially for CRNAs....any other schools? Most schools seem to have PhDs in economics etc....I really would like to concentrate on education or even better...the VCU PhD in anesthesia.
  8. 0
    Quote from loisane
    I know it is off the topic, but I just have to respond to sonessrna.

    You most certainly don't have to leave anesthesia to teach. Aren't most of your (classroom) instructors CRNAs? We have an incredible faculty shortage in nurse anesthesia. I am always very glad to hear SRNA/CRNAs express an interest in teaching, we need you!

    Maybe you were thinking of this already, and just meant leaving clinical, not leaving anesthesia. But I have spoken with people before who were considering teaching in the future, and for some reason they often are just thinking about undergrad nursing programs.

    As a CRNA you will be qualified to teach in many nurse anesthesia graduate programs. I agree that a MSN has some advantages if you are considering this route. If you have a non-nursing masters, you will be limited to teaching in non-masters programs.

    I also agree about a doctorate. We do have some non-doctorate faculty now, but very soon a doctorate will be required most everywhere.

    loisane crna
    loisane crna, how do you handle the hostility coming from all the rresidents/MDs out there who don't understand the scope of practice of CRNAs etc? How do you keep the peace so to speak without getting very upset and personally offended?
  9. 0
    Quote from sonessrna
    What type of PhD would you recommend for someone who might consider teaching at a CRNA school? I see VCU has a PhD specificially for CRNAs....any other schools?
    IMHO, a doctorate in nursing would cover the most ground, because it would allow you to teach in any program. A non nursing doctorate would most likely limit you to schools that are non-nursing. BTW, while a PhD is the top of the heap, there are other doctorates to choose from.

    When the time comes, I am sure you can weigh all the options. Until then, you might think about (after graduation) doing clinical anesthesia where there are anesthesia students. That way you could get some experience working with students, and also see how you like it.

    loisane crna
  10. 0
    Quote from sonessrna
    loisane crna, how do you handle the hostility coming from all the rresidents/MDs out there who don't understand the scope of practice of CRNAs etc? How do you keep the peace so to speak without getting very upset and personally offended?
    Hmm-obviously, this is pretty tough to answer. Not all physicians are as hostile as others. For the ones that are, I keep things focused on the patient, and work hard on being the very best I can be. There is a great deal of satisfaction in the constant, unspoken proof of how great nurse anesthesia care can be. Every time I function with excellence and grace, just defuses their argument that CRNAs are hopeless idiots.

    Away from work, it is a whole different story. I am active in my state association, working to kick their butts--just referring to the hostile ones, of course ;-)

    loisane crna
  11. 0
    I believe strongly in being active in your state association. Our state, California, although large has only a few active members in the organization. I like politics, so I will volunteer there. But those of you who don't care for politics, there is fund raising, peer assistance, newsletter, etc comittees.
    It is so important to be active.


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