Please help! CRNA school for Post-Master student - page 3

Hi everyone, Please help with the names of the schools that waive GRE for Post-Master students. Is any particular schools that accept more applicants then others.?... Read More

  1. Visit  JDIII profile page
    1
    Quote from olderthandirt2
    I read recently one study from USUHS stating that older women had a higher attrition rate.....then I looked at the sample population which was .....um, small (~70, albeit over several years). Considering that women are a minority in the CRNA field, especially in the military services I think this study needs repeating with larger populations (more years) AND comparing to NON-military CRNA programs to military programs (regarding gender).

    You can tell, I am fairly biased in my view on this study (which was posted in the AANA....).
    That being said, I commend USUHS on their work, now I believe the study lays the ground for further research.......As my PhD husband always says, "how many times has the study been repeated?...."

    I'm an active duty Army RN and currently applying for the LTHET for nurse anesthesia for 2011. I was a medic for 10 years and worked in various critical care environments. I have been an RN for almost 3yrs and work in the ER. Due to the low acuity of the patients we see at the facility that I am stationed, I decided to get my NY state license and work at a civilian hospital on my days off from the military. I did this to get the skills needed to hopefully help prepare me for nurse anesthesia school because their ER deals with critical patients and ICU holds. I'm currently trying to get into their ICU. I'm also PALS certified and an ACLS instructor, very active in volunteering in the community, wife is a full time ICU nurse, we have 2 kids (8 and 6) who are very active in sports, and a 2 year old. I also try to go up to the OR and work with the crna's and get some PACU time where I am stationed. With this being said one of us is always home with our children, and we still make time for each other (lol).
    I said all that to say this...I think time management is important, and I'm VERY motivated to go and succeed. I studied, and took the GRE. I passed the quantitative (math) over 500, and essay. The qualitative (verbal) I got below 500. The Army requirements are 500 verbal, 500 math, and 3.5 essay. My undergrad GPA is ok at 3.4. The reading comprehension, math, and essay I can see being a factor. When it comes to word analogies and comparing relationships, I think that it's a non factor,and that is the area on the GRE that hurt me. If it was medical terminology maybe I would feel a little different. Even if I did great on the verbal section, I would still agree 100% that the drive, motivation, determination, some experience, level of maturity, time management skills, and faith will help you tremendously. I agree that the GRE should be a factor especially if you do horrible, but not a decision maker because some individuals learn better in a classroom environment and hands on. I'm going to take the GRE again in February. Thanks guys for being so open on here and please respond with more thoughts and concerns. LT Denson
    lyela likes this.
  2. Visit  Gennaver profile page
    0
    Hello LT,

    Your clinical background sounds strong to me. I am also a June 2011 start applicant and have been on a med/surg floor for two years. Thankfully though my command is supportive and are going to float/precept me in the ICUs for 10 months prior to the start of the program. Natually, this is based upon my acceptance to the program in the April/May boards for it.

    My GRE aged out this Januay, (turned 5 yo). So, darn, got to re-take it asap. I was really hoping to have time to study for it but, looks like I will have a couple of days to study for it this time. The phase II director at my site told me that they really consider your science GPA and hopefully that will carry you, as well as your strong background too!

    Best wishes,
    Your hopeful fellow classmate,
    Jen
  3. Visit  olderthandirt2 profile page
    0
    I agree that the GRE should be a factor especially if you do horrible, but not a decision maker because some individuals learn better in a classroom environment and hands on. I'm going to take the GRE again in February. Thanks guys for being so open on here and please respond with more thoughts and concerns. LT Denson

    That can be the case, if they (USAGPAN) are looking to fill seats.....but if there are an abundance of applicants, and all the other applicants scored > 1000 (and perhaps you need a waiver for gre < 1000)......you may lose out. They "talked about" raising the standards for acceptance (due to the # of applicants) but I don't know that they have. I do know one thing for sure.......you will do ALOT of testing (60/yr).

    Anyhow, study hard and do well.....then no worries.

    good luck
  4. Visit  clarkbl profile page
    0
    lots of schools now waive the GRE, usually depending on your GPA. I think I remember Georgetown waived it if your gpa was above a 3.5. Also, I think Univ of Maryland would waive it too for a good gpa... I can't remember for sure.
    If I were you, I'd just schedule it, take a practice test, and take it within the next couple of weeks. Admissions look more at your experience and gpa than the gre
  5. Visit  daytonscran profile page
    0
    try PA schools: villanova, penn, drexel
  6. Visit  ILoveRatties profile page
    0
    The question being asked is not about schools that do not require the GRE at all, but those that waive if for people who have already taken it.

    two thoughts
    1. just why should one be required to retake the GRE if you have successfully completed an MSN program.

    2. why make it a matter of deciding where you go?? Unless everything else is equal, just study for the thing if you are required to take it and pass it again.
  7. Visit  SRNA4U profile page
    0
    Hello,

    THere are many POst Master's Certificate Nurse Anesthesia programs such as Villanova, Frank Tornetta School of Anesthesis, East Carolina University, and Drexel University, which do not require the GRE exam. I think it has been proven many times that the GRE is not a reliable indicator of how well a student will do in anesthesia school since it does not measure motivation and other scenarios that students have as part of their experience. I have taken the GRE 6 times for the sake of it and my highest score was 910 (500 Verbal, 410 Math and 4.5 Analytical).

    I applied to 4 Post Masters Nurse Anesthesia programs and I already have 3 interviews already scheduled. My MSN is in Nursing Education and my GPA was 3.91. My indergrad GPA was 3.0 and my science GPA was 3.0. I've been a nurse for 13 years and I have worked in OR, med-surg, ICU, correctional nursing, and ER. I think having a broad experience in nursing definitely helps and my graduate school GPA 3.9 definitely proved I can handle graduate work. I am currently studying for my CCRN in May. I really think I have a good chance of getting in. I applied to start school in Fall 2013, which is when I am leaving active duty to to inactive Reserves while I complete school and then return back to active duty when I finish to complete my last 7 years for retirement from the military.

    I think a POst-Masters program is a great deal since you are not required to do a thesis or research project and you are exempt from taking the same classes from your MSN program such as nursing theory and research. All you take are your anesthesia courses aloing with your basic core courses such as pharmacology, health assessment, and pathophysiology. When you finish the program, you get a certificate which allows you to sit for the anesthesia boards. Your class load will be much lighter compared to the traditional MSN anesthesia students but you still finish the program in the same amouint of time as the other students.

    Hope this helps,

    Air Force RN
  8. Visit  ixnay profile page
    2
    I can tell you for a fact that a previous GPA and a GRE score mean nothing about how you're going to do in anesthesia school. I'm currently in my third semester of school. I had a 3.75 in my BSN program, and a 1280 GRE score on my first try (cold turkey). All that says is that I'm fairly good at taking standardized tests. CRNA school is much more about motivation and determination to put up with the incredible amount of BS (and I'm not talking about a degree here) that is heaped on you. Motivation is my biggest hurdle right now. I'm so overwhelmed with the amount and depth of material that I'm truly beginning to question how badly I really want this. Everyone says "it gets better", but I keep waiting for that to happen, and it hasn't yet.
    canchaser and wtbcrna like this.
  9. Visit  nikkimarthe profile page
    0
    Are there some crna programs that dont let you do thesis if you have done it to in prior master's?
  10. Visit  nikkimarthe profile page
    0
    Boston Collge does not require gpa, neither did Maryland university for post master's and as aforementioned, UPMCH hamot, villanova and drexel...found more post master's in PA than in most states
  11. Visit  xX Goose Xx profile page
    0
    Quote from ixnay
    I can tell you for a fact that a previous GPA and a GRE score mean nothing about how you're going to do in anesthesia school. I'm currently in my third semester of school. I had a 3.75 in my BSN program, and a 1280 GRE score on my first try (cold turkey). All that says is that I'm fairly good at taking standardized tests. CRNA school is much more about motivation and determination to put up with the incredible amount of BS (and I'm not talking about a degree here) that is heaped on you. Motivation is my biggest hurdle right now. I'm so overwhelmed with the amount and depth of material that I'm truly beginning to question how badly I really want this. Everyone says "it gets better", but I keep waiting for that to happen, and it hasn't yet.
    It will, just stay on top of material. I am in a front loaded program. Clinicals is a whole different stressor, but very manageable if you stay on top of the material. Once you start to apply it in everyday situations, the big picture will start to get a little more clear.


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