Minority SRNA/CRNA's - page 7

:) Hello I have been a lurker here for quite some time and finally decided to post. I have learned soo much from reading these threads. Allnurses is a great resource! I have been an RN for three... Read More

  1. by   CaslaRN
    Are you willing to move? If so apply to Barry as well. Mercer is hard to get into but worth a try. Also apply to MCG. The key is to have great LORs, GRE >1000 and be outstanding in the interview.

    Being black has nothing to do with it in my opinion. If you shine all around, you will be judge by what you bring to the table and not the color of your skin. Besides, it may be an advantage (depends on how you look at it).

    I have YET in 36 years to not succeed in anything that I have set as a goal. I have gotten jobs that some say I couldn't, gone places that some say "you may not belong or be welcomed" and have been fine. It is all in your mental attitude. Bob Marley says "Imanicipate yourself from mental slavery, none but yourself can free your mind".......... that attitude along with hard work and a constant drive to always do my best and to carry myself in such a manner that I break down barriers or stereotypes have worked well for me.

    Good luck ............ and apply next year. PM if you have any further questions. I am also in the "Atlanta" area.
  2. by   1310
    Student 79,

    It sounds like you are on the right track . . . I think your grades are more than competitive! I respectfully disagree with another poster that states programs do not take into consideration your working + school history. However, programs often make many discriminatory decisions . . . not always racial discrimination.

    I have a friend who was told he was too old to attend anesthesia school by one program. They said he/she wouldn't be able to learn the art of anesthesia! He's in his fourties! This is a nurse whom that particular program and potentially the people interviewing him were intellectually threatened by. He/she is clinically superior to many experienced physicians and nurses I have encountered in the ICU. This school does not offer a clinical interview and states that they "want to see if you will be a good fit at their university." So, 15 years of clinical practice, roughly 1300 GRE, and significant contributions to nursing practice in the facility he worked got him an alternate spot.

    My point is . . . who knows what the hell various programs want. Objectively, to some programs you may be a highly attractive candidate, others may not give you the time of day (although I don't see how).

    My advice is to work hard becoming clinically superior to your peers. It doesn't mean that you will be, but strive to overshoot the requirements of admission and you will surely succeed!

    Take extra classes in science (pick up a minor in biology or chemistry during your bridge program). Slam dunk the GRE, take your CCRN (it's easy, don't be afraid), then take it to the next level by learning the material like your life depended on it (because in the ICU your patients life may depend on it).

    Go to work in a facility that is a teaching hospital with the highest acuity and sickest patients in the city. Learn from the intensivist. Get to know CRNA's; go shadow some. Make this goal your mission!

    Study, study, study!

    If you really put your mind to it you can do this.

    There is no cut and dry method.

    Just remember Mr. Miagi when he told Daniel-son "Do or do not, there is no try!"

    Good luck!
  3. by   HIMECCRN
    I am a minority and I found out today that I had been accepted into a program. I was confident that my background would make me stand out in the interview.:dncg:
  4. by   sirJazz
    ei guys... im filipino accepted at VCU this fall 08! nervous of course since im moving from metropolitan new york to virginia. but I have high hopes and am really confident that i will have a blast with my classmates and faculty. good luck to all!
    Last edit by sirJazz on Jan 26, '08
  5. by   SWTNES
    Quote from SheRN1
    I find this thread very interesting because these are some of the same questions I have pondered. I was fortunate enough to meet 2 African American female CRNA's. Since, this meeting they have always been a great source of encouragement to me and my goals of becoming a CRNA. As a African American woman I know that we have to strive and work harder to enter the field. But, never give up and my best advice is to try network with these CRNA's they are always willing to help other minorities who have drive and determination. I know that hard work, determination and drive is what got me accepted into an Anesthesia program for 2006.
    Hello,

    I am a future African American CRNA. I plan to start at Memorial Hospital in Rhode Island in May 2009. How is your program going for you. Any words of encouragement. How did you manage finances during your school while not being able to work? I know you are looking forward to the light at the end of the tunnel since you program will be ending soon.
  6. by   SWTNES
    Quote from HIMECCRN
    I am a minority and I found out today that I had been accepted into a program. I was confident that my background would make me stand out in the interview.:dncg:
    CONGRATS!!!!!!!!!!
  7. by   SWTNES
    Congrats!!!!! Which school will you be attending? I plan to apply this year to Memorial Hospital in Rhode Island and Excela in PA.
  8. by   BUTTERFLY SRNA
    As much as they say that everyone's equal, CRNA schools don't see color,
    try that in the South. From teachers to students: minorities are mostly treated as 'invisible'. The whites give notes and previous exams and full support to each other. The nonwhites will just have to find their own resources. One time, an AfAm classmate of mine needed some notes for
    review, the caucasian classmate gave it to her, on condition that she
    not tell the he handed her some notes. The teachers tend to listen to gripes from caucasian students, who mostly are content and happy and 'winging' it with hand-me-down notes/old exams. Those minorities who
    don't get them, of course, end up w/ Bs or Cs. The minute you complain
    about the courseload, of course, you are labeled as a trouble maker.
    What's a shame is this, even in the hallways or library, your own white
    classmates treat you as invisible.....AT THIS DAY & AGE of magnet, it is
    simply appalling and deplorable! You get what you want as a minority if
    you play their game of playing 'weak'. I'm not the type to cry for help, but
    I was an A student before CRNA school and I am now dropping out because of 2 semesters w/ Cs and they did not want to consider or work it out with me.. I know I'm not the only one who's struggling (I know why I struggle, b/c for most of my white classmates, 1/2 the work is done w/
    old tests/notes, I have to start from scratch and it really gets overwhelming, albeit, impossible to score As. My point is, diversity in the South is nothing but lip service. They are capable of undermining a minority's confidence and performance with their silent way of bullying you and subtle ways of exclusion. Minorities, be aware of this game....this is
    the reason why we're not well-represented, the system only supports their kind: bright, smart, white, & not b/c we cannot make it, it's b/c the degree
    is practically handed to them...
  9. by   mark2climb
    Quote from BUTTERFLY SRNA
    mostly are content and happy and 'winging' it with hand-me-down notes/old exams. Those minorities who
    don't get them, of course, end up w/ Bs or Cs.
    Would you be truly satisfied with your degree if you were "winging it with hand-me-down notes/old exams? And by minorities, do you mean African American? What about the men in your class? What about other races or are they not considered minorities?

    My point is, diversity in the South is nothing but lip service. They are capable of undermining a minority's confidence and performance with their silent way of bullying you and subtle ways of exclusion. Minorities, be aware of this game....this is
    the reason why we're not well-represented, the system only supports their kind: bright, smart, white, & not b/c we cannot make it, it's b/c the degree
    is practically handed to them...
    Are men well represented in the system? Are they considered minorities? How about non-caucasian men?
  10. by   BUTTERFLY SRNA
    Truthfully, nope, you feel empty and that you're cheating the system that way if you can get by with hand-me-downs or old exams..the final test of your true intelligence is how you make it in the boards..that's when your true capability is tested: you're there on your own, no help from outsiders, whatsoever..But to make it and to play DA game, ie, to get to the finish line, it would be best to avail of what's out there that's given to everyone.

    For me, who's not given much in terms of old notes, the best thing that happened was I managed to do it from scratch, but again, it takes time to
    make those reviewers....all things being equal..c/t the SRNA who gets all the freebies, the extra time in their hands can be put to good use by
    memorizing the endless materials that are required to 'regurgitate' back
    to teachers..this is where the As come from..for me who does everything
    by scratch, there's the time factor, how much can I possibly squeeze into
    my studying, given that I'm allotting a few hrs making those reviews? So, there, I get by w/ Bs and Cs...you hear those A students complain? Nope,
    that too makes them look good, all with the 'intangible' support.

    You asked abt men as minority, no there's a visible amt of men in the program, well supported as well. Minority means people of color, we're a rarity in Anesthesia. My teacher once said that previous studies have shown that not a lot of minorities make it in this field...I really know why,
    as I said, opportunities and special accommodations are pretty much given to the whites to perpetuate that squeaky clean, predominantly white image of a CRNA. It's sad, huh? Because if we say as healthcare providers that we see no color in treating out patients, why is there a lot of hypocrisy among us nurses and not treat each other, our own colleagues, in a color-blind manner...? It's not the same at all for MDs, that's why they're true professionals .
  11. by   CandyGyrl
    It's funny because I posted a thread about this same/similar topic. I wondered because I'd heard things. I experience invisibility and isolation from non minority students...{I'm not in CRNA school} I'm very friendly, outgoing and attractive it just seems they are alot more comfortable with each other. Even if you do break bread with them it's kinda akward and it seems like everyone is being so phony so I just keep to myself and study hard. Not trying to gripe but this has been my experience. I've even noticed that these students may be overly friendly to another non-minority student in the class even though they don't know them just to bring them into their circle and let them know they're welcome but keep others locked out.

    I almost feel as if there are preconceived notions that maybe they don't think I'm that smart so I find myself feeling as if I have something to prove. This also keeps me isolated and I don't understand it. It's like the older I get the more I see these really sick hidden discrepancies in people and I get so annoyed. Alot of non whites may not understand because it's not blatent... you'd have to be in a minorities shoes to understand.

    I'm sorry and don't mean to go on but it just got to me because I understand what Butterfly is saying. I noticed that too. I'd say this is what friends do but when you don't have a friend that has gone before you, you just don't have those same advantages. Even if you were friend with the friend who had the friend that had gone through this pgm before you'd still have the pre-knowledge base... but when you're an outsider and a minority you have to work quadruple hard and still not receive the same respect.

    Here's Hoping Things will CHANGE
  12. by   mark2climb
    Does minority not mean minority anymore or does it translate only to one of a color that is not white? Does color only mean black? If not, why aren't people of other colors complaining?
  13. by   MinoritySRNA
    Sounds like you are pointing the finger at everyone but yourself for your failure. Your personal failure has little if anything to do with whether or not the entire class is cheating their way through or not. You as a minority or not a minority does not excuse you from not being able to "handle" the course work you are required. If you cannot "make the grade" and maintain the minimum GPA, YOU have failed to meet your requirement. Anesthesia school is difficult and not all "whites" "make it". As a minority, I can say that what you have posted is possibly the most racist thing I've every read and I'm disgusted. Good luck with your future.

close