Med school to CRNA

  1. Hey all,

    Just a few quick questions. I'm currently a first-year medical student who has been interested in Anesthesiology. However, I am learning that a lot of what we learned will eventually be irrelevant to practice after specialization, and I'm actually pretty bored and lament the duration of the education, for now. (Regardless of what others say, medical school is not conceptually difficult)

    I am just curious what CRNA admission people would think about a previous medical student who decided to change paths. I don't have a BSN or anything, but I could easily pick one up in an accelerated program, especially after a year of med school.
    •  
  2. 19 Comments

  3. by   suzanne4
    Quote from HouseDO
    Hey all,

    Just a few quick questions. I'm currently a first-year medical student who has been interested in Anesthesiology. However, I am learning that a lot of what we learned will eventually be irrelevant to practice after specialization, and I'm actually pretty bored and lament the duration of the education, for now. (Regardless of what others say, medical school is not conceptually difficult)

    I am just curious what CRNA admission people would think about a previous medical student who decided to change paths. I don't have a BSN or anything, but I could easily pick one up in an accelerated program, especially after a year of med school.
    You cannot just pick up a degree easily, you are going to need to complete the pre-reqs for any program and they are usually different from those required for medical school. You do not get any credit for the medical school training, same as if you already graduated from medical school.

    Once you do get the RN after your name, you are going to be required to complete at least one year as a staff nurse in an ICU before you can start any program. The more experience as an ICU nurse, the more that is in your favor.

    There has already been much on this subject here, just do a search.
  4. by   HouseDO2b?
    Quote from suzanne4
    You cannot just pick up a degree easily, you are going to need to complete the pre-reqs for any program and they are usually different from those required for medical school. You do not get any credit for the medical school training, same as if you already graduated from medical school.

    Once you do get the RN after your name, you are going to be required to complete at least one year as a staff nurse in an ICU before you can start any program. The more experience as an ICU nurse, the more that is in your favor.

    There has already been much on this subject here, just do a search.
    There is considerable overlap in the prereqs for BSN and premed programs (my wife is a RN), particularly anyone who took additional courses outside of the requirements. Of the things I am missing (undergrad level Micro and A&P) I don't think they will be a problem after having these in med school.
  5. by   MethaneMan
    Sure, go for it. I have always thought that Med School and residency is a poor value for the money/time commitment that is required to attain the ability to make a living. The CRNA school route, in my opinion, is the way to go. You will be out far less money/time and will still be able to practice anesthesia independently. However, in your instance, you have to decide if the bird in the bush is better than the bird in hand.
  6. by   amandanurse
    There is a great deal of overlap between med school pre-reqs and nursing. In fact, your additional science courses will make you a strong CRNA candidate. I would encourage you to pursue an accelerated BSN program. Although some schools will accept an alternative Bachelor's degree and an associates degree in nursing, it would probably be less time consuming to go the accelerated BSN route. Associate degree programs will get you the RN license but will take just as much if not more time than the accelerated BSN. Besides, you already have on the basic core courses as well as electives to easily aquire a second Bachelor's. Good luck.
  7. by   catcolalex
    you are crazy to quit now, I would stick it out and finish. You would probably be done quicker if you finish what you are doing. And you will have the potential to make much more money doing roughly the same things without anybody keeping you down and telling you that your not good enough to do them.
  8. by   yanka12
    I agree. Stick to it! By the time you'll finish BSN and all required ICU expirience for admit. to CRNA school, you'd probaly be in second year of Residency as MD.
    Just a thought.


    Quote from catcolalex
    you are crazy to quit now, I would stick it out and finish. You would probably be done quicker if you finish what you are doing. And you will have the potential to make much more money doing roughly the same things without anybody keeping you down and telling you that your not good enough to do them.
  9. by   foxyhill21
    I would just stay in medical school and deal with it
  10. by   HouseDO2b?
    Quote from catcolalex
    you are crazy to quit now, I would stick it out and finish. You would probably be done quicker if you finish what you are doing. And you will have the potential to make much more money doing roughly the same things without anybody keeping you down and telling you that your not good enough to do them.
    It depends. The fields most of us will enter do not pay any better than CRNA, but require several more years of education (7 post-bacc to become a FP compared to ~ 3 for CRNA). Parts of school are enjoyable, but I do wish I would have spent more time out of school before going back.

    To finish what I'm doing now is at least 6 more years
    If I decided to leave and get a CRNA, it is around 1.5 for the accelerated BSN, 1 working in an ICU, and 2 for the CRNA, so about 4.5 years minimum.

    I'll stick around and see what happens. I hear things get better second year.
  11. by   Focker
    I have to agree with catcolalex, crna is a great career, but you wouldn't save any time by quitting med school to get a bsn, then experience, then 2+ years of crna school. It seems to me like both would take close to 6 years, 3 more years med school, 3 years residency, and you are an anesthesiologist.
  12. by   Nursing P.
    No offense but many people would kill to be were you are. I am graduating with a BSN with may and I'm interested in anesthesia. I just got a job in the ICU (1 year of critical care experience) for CRNA and I'm debating whether I should try to go to medical school. I still have to take the premed requirements that I didn't get in my nursing education. I think working as an RN would just slow me down if I want to go to medschool. Tough it out and your be an MD which is worth it.
  13. by   smileyRn96
    Finish what you have started. In the end you will be an Anesthesologist making a half mill +/yr($$$$$). Plus, you have no idea how long it will take you to get into CRNA school. You could possibly have to apply multiple times. I am sure the road looks long right now, but hang in there.
  14. by   AdonaiLoveable
    Hello HouseDO2b,

    Have you considered the career of Anesthesia Assistant (AA)? These are anesthesia providers trained in the medical model similarly to Physician Assistants. Their programs require the same pre-med courses you took to get into medical school so you wouldn't have to take extra coursework or get another baccalaureate degree. There are only four schools who train people to become AA's and my limited understanding of that profession is that they provide anesthesia services and care just like CRNAs do, but they work under the license of a physician (like PAs do) rather than their own license like CRNAs and NPs do.

    Check them out at the following websites I googled:
    http://www.asahq.org/career/aa.htm
    http://www.anesthesiaassistant.com/index.html

close