difference between Nurse Anesthetist and anesthesiologist - page 5

is a anesthesiologist the same as a nurse anesthetist? Just wondering although I am not yet even a pre-nursing student because in my life I have had four surgeries and may, in the near future,... Read More

  1. by   yoga crna
    Any discussion about CRNA income MUST be based upon the value of administering anesthesia. If you have a problem with this, look at the pharmacology of the drugs we use and the short safety:risk ratio. What is the VALUE of administering anesthesia for a c-section where both the mother and fetus are at risk. We are paid for our education, skills, experience, ability to put our patients to sleep and wake them up safely. All of that in an environment where we have little control, play second fiddle to the surgeon, put up with less than professional helpers, in a cold noisy operating room. Our patients are frequently non-compliant as far as maintaining their own health, underestimate what it is we do and complain if they have the slightest complication, such as a sore throat.

    Despite all of that, we love our work, wouldn't do anything else, are happy that we left mainstream nursing and are very proud of our profession.

    Also, basic economics plays a role in our income. Demand for anesthesia services is greater than ever and will continue as long as there are people who need surgery, have babies, drive motor vehicles, get old, have pain, etc. etc.

    If you value anesthesia, there should be no discussion on the reimbursement for the service.

    Yoga
    Last edit by yoga crna on May 9, '05
  2. by   mrdoc2005
    My two cents:
    There is nothing wrong with saying I worked very hard, went to school (while my friends played and bragged about their new 30K car while I had a piece of crap) and now I am being rewarded because of all of this.

    In short, no manner what you do there is nothing wrong in saying money played a factor in my choice. However, those that do things only for money will learn to hate what they do and in most cases quit.


    Quote from sonessrna
    Well, if the docs aren[t in it for the money why do I see posts on SDN that ask questions referring to how much money can be made in gas, which residencies are the easiest with the most money, how gas is better paid than some other specialties? In addition, I frequently hear physicians talking about their houses,cars, etc...sometimes CRNAs as well...but the comment ab out
    $300,000 just solidivfied my opinions that many MDAs are in it for the money.
  3. by   deepz
    Quote from mrdoc2005
    ......no manner what you do there is nothing wrong in saying money played a factor in my choice. ........

    "If you're not a socialist at 20, you have no heart. If not a capitalist at 40, you have no head." --- Anonymous

    !
  4. by   Lambert5883
    Quote from deepz
    "If you're not a socialist at 20, you have no heart. If not a capitalist at 40, you have no head." --- Anonymous
    !
    Why are we even talking about one's motivation behind pursuing a certain line of work. It's funny. The original OP is probably saying, "man those people are strange! All I wanted to know is what the difference is!"

    Hey deepz, are you in Denver? Do you know Will Maclevane? Worked alot with Dr. Rothenburg in peds.
  5. by   Laughing Gas
    Quote from ramiro_ac
    and md's donate 100k b/c obviously they arent in it for the money either... :chuckle
    Not sure where you're going with this one.
  6. by   Ventjock
    .......
    Last edit by Ventjock on Feb 12, '08 : Reason: im blank
  7. by   Laughing Gas
    Quote from ramiro_ac
    i was being sarcastic...just as that poster wrote that CRNA's should donate anything over 45K to a charity so should the docs...b/c everyones in this profession just for the work...MONEY is a factor, no matter what anybody says, shouldnt be the biggest factor but it is

    for ex. when dating someone, we first the outside. thats what attracts us AT FIRST. (ahem money) then once you get deeper into knowing the person (THE WORK) then you see if you like them or not. there are some beautiful people out there (LOTS OF CASH) who are the ugliest on the inside (TERRIBLE WORK)...and vice versa....like um paramedics, teachers, NURSES, social workers, etc.
    For whom is the biggest factor money? You seem to have given yourself the ability to assess motive that addresses thousands of professionals.

    As for your dating/salary scenario, I am still not clear on your intention. Maybe it is your inconsistent use of punctuation and capital letters that makes understanding you difficult. Then I re-read your post a couple of times and have come to the realization that there is no discernable point.

    You seem to be passionate, but I am not sure what you are passionate about. If you do have some insightful knowledge, please quit hiding it. Let us know how you have come to such a deep understanding of nursing, anesthesia and economics.
  8. by   jewelcutt
    This thread is getting really confusing. Here's a question, Why is it when everyone is comparing CRNA education they say we have only six years. Do we sit on our a** for 2-5 years in a busy intensive care unit, learning entirely nothing, making the same money as residents do? Oh, so our work as the most autonomous nurses in the hospital, saving lives often without docs around doesn't count for sh**! Like we sit around on nights for the brand new first year OB rotating resident to come to our rescue to help us save our patients and make our decisions for us. I respect all of the residents and doctors I've worked with, but I'm getting real tired of hearing people say we only go through 6 years because we all learn through both education and experience. Personally I have 3 yrs of a science degree, 4 yrs to a BSN, 3 yrs ICU, 2 1/2 yrs Anesthesia school, it doesn't quite add up to 6 yrs. You will also find that most students in anesthesia school have far more than 1-2 years of ICU experience and they often take additional science courses on the side to get into school. For god sakes, give us some credit. And to all of you non-nurses out there, shut up with your menial comments about nursing. You have no idea how hard of a job it is with little respect given and very little compensation. Nurses are with patients ALL THE TIME, nobody cares for their patients as much as nurses do. You should all be so lucky to have a nurse take care of you. These statements aren't meant for everyone, just those that spout opinions without any background knowledge or base their opinions on one-time experiences. Going to bed now, sorry
  9. by   skipaway
    Quote from jewelcutt
    This thread is getting really confusing. Here's a question, Why is it when everyone is comparing CRNA education they say we have only six years. Do we sit on our a** for 2-5 years in a busy intensive care unit, learning entirely nothing, making the same money as residents do? Oh, so our work as the most autonomous nurses in the hospital, saving lives often without docs around doesn't count for sh**! Like we sit around on nights for the brand new first year OB rotating resident to come to our rescue to help us save our patients and make our decisions for us. I respect all of the residents and doctors I've worked with, but I'm getting real tired of hearing people say we only go through 6 years because we all learn through both education and experience. Personally I have 3 yrs of a science degree, 4 yrs to a BSN, 3 yrs ICU, 2 1/2 yrs Anesthesia school, it doesn't quite add up to 6 yrs. You will also find that most students in anesthesia school have far more than 1-2 years of ICU experience and they often take additional science courses on the side to get into school. For god sakes, give us some credit. And to all of you non-nurses out there, shut up with your menial comments about nursing. You have no idea how hard of a job it is with little respect given and very little compensation. Nurses are with patients ALL THE TIME, nobody cares for their patients as much as nurses do. You should all be so lucky to have a nurse take care of you. These statements aren't meant for everyone, just those that spout opinions without any background knowledge or base their opinions on one-time experiences. Going to bed now, sorry
    Jewelcutt,
    Tell us how you really feel.
    You've made several excellent points.

    skipaway
  10. by   versatile_kat
    Quote from jewelcutt
    This thread is getting really confusing. Here's a question, Why is it when everyone is comparing CRNA education they say we have only six years. Do we sit on our a** for 2-5 years in a busy intensive care unit, learning entirely nothing, making the same money as residents do? Oh, so our work as the most autonomous nurses in the hospital, saving lives often without docs around doesn't count for sh**! Like we sit around on nights for the brand new first year OB rotating resident to come to our rescue to help us save our patients and make our decisions for us. I respect all of the residents and doctors I've worked with, but I'm getting real tired of hearing people say we only go through 6 years because we all learn through both education and experience. Personally I have 3 yrs of a science degree, 4 yrs to a BSN, 3 yrs ICU, 2 1/2 yrs Anesthesia school, it doesn't quite add up to 6 yrs. You will also find that most students in anesthesia school have far more than 1-2 years of ICU experience and they often take additional science courses on the side to get into school. For god sakes, give us some credit. And to all of you non-nurses out there, shut up with your menial comments about nursing. You have no idea how hard of a job it is with little respect given and very little compensation. Nurses are with patients ALL THE TIME, nobody cares for their patients as much as nurses do. You should all be so lucky to have a nurse take care of you. These statements aren't meant for everyone, just those that spout opinions without any background knowledge or base their opinions on one-time experiences. Going to bed now, sorry
    Ouch! I feel like I just got b*tch slapped - and this wasn't even directed at me ... I like it!
  11. by   Sheri257
    Quote from jewelcutt
    Nurses are with patients ALL THE TIME, nobody cares for their patients as much as nurses do. You should all be so lucky to have a nurse take care of you. These statements aren't meant for everyone, just those that spout opinions without any background knowledge or base their opinions on one-time experiences.
    Well, I may be a lowly student, but I also work as a CNA. Not all nurses care about their patients, and not all nurses are with their patients all of the time. With some of them, you're lucky if they visit the patient a couple of times during the entire shift. I wasn't basing my opinion on a one time experience.

    There are good nurses and bad nurses, just as there are good docs and bad docs. I've seen docs refuse to prescribe pain meds and, even when they were prescribed, I've seen nurses refuse to administer them when the patient is screaming in pain. I've seen RNs who have more time shop on the internet at the nurses station than set foot in a patient's room. I've seen patients coding and the RN was nowhere to be found.

    I've also seen excellent docs and nurses who are always attentive and always there for the patients. So, again, I don't see how you can generalize about one group versus another.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on May 11, '05
  12. by   Ventjock
    ............................
    Last edit by Ventjock on Feb 12, '08 : Reason: grown up
  13. by   Ventjock
    to the OP i forgot to answer the question

    difference is that one holds a MD degree and the other CRNA degree. pretty much it.

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